Ballotting on Grammar Schools

Something that slightly puzzles me here:

Labour is set to reignite the political row over selective education by making it easier for disaffected parents to force the closure of their local grammar schools.

Jim Knight, the schools minister, has instructed officials to look at how to simplify the balloting process by which schools can be forced to drop selection under a 1998 law.

Why is there no mention of being able to have a ballot to enforce selection? Is it simply because the article doesn\’t mention it? Or is it not actually possible to ask for such a ballot. And if the latter, why not?

4 comments on “Ballotting on Grammar Schools

  1. Quote: “Why is there no mention of being able to have a ballot to enforce selection? ….Or is it not actually possible to ask for such a ballot. And if the latter, why not?”

    It is not. This is to prevent people from using the legislation that was intended to kill off grammar school education to restore it instead. The giveaway is the date (1998= NuLab year 1).

  2. It’s a classic case of reverting to the Old Labour way of levelling down. You missed this recent news item:

    “Almost a quarter of secondary schools are failing, with less than 30 per cent of their pupils achieving five good GCSEs including English and maths, the Government admitted last night.

    “Lord Adonis, the Schools Minister, said that 800 state secondary schools in Britain were not reaching expected standards. ‘The waste of talent and potential this represents simply isn’t acceptable for the future,’ he said.”
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/education/article2577874.ece

    And this:

    “Two-thirds of Wales’s local authorities are not spending enough on education, according to a teachers’ union. The National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) said its research shows spending by 14 of the 22 councils is below expected budget levels.”
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7012744.stm

    The grim fact is that councillors in many Labour heartland local education authorities never shared TB’s enthusiasm for: Education, Education, Education.

    For them, better schools and education standards means creating Tory voters thereby jeopardising Labour control of the council or the prospect of more school leavers going away to uni and not returning. I joke not.

  3. I see this as another attempt to peck away at something, a bit like the Treaty – keep asking the same question differently until enough people are fooled/bored to get your way.

  4. Ostensibly the work of Knight (privately educated, Eltham College), this reeks of Balls (privately educated, Nottingham High School).

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