8 comments on “The Slaughter Continues

  1. Butchered indoors? Were the bunnies pets? And why were the last two days particularly violent?
    Tim adds: No, not pets, wild. We’re in the country here. No, the kittens are growing up, becoming more confident in their hunting skills is all. They do insist on bringning them in, that’s all.

  2. Ah. For a moment there, I thought perhaps they had finagled the lock on the rabbit cage while you were out. My niece has a similar problem with one of her two cats – he’s quite adept at catching jackrabbits in the middle of the night. Fortunately, they do not have a cat-door, so the cat and the dead prey wait until morning at the sliding glass door for her husband to open it (which he doesn’t – he goes around the side and cleans things up before she gets up and screams again).

  3. Timmy, don’t you dare harm them kittens.
    What’s come over you man?
    If you don’t want the prey stretchered out around your front door, put citrus peel around the doorstep.
    Rats can kill you with disease.
    How can cats kill you?

  4. Well look on the bright side, they were probably the slowest and dumbest rabbits and rats in the whole of the UK. So by falling prey to a bunch of kittens (for Cryin’ out loud! Kittens?!) they are helping improve the species. They’re not killing defenceless animals, you’re producing Super Bunnies.

    Besides, if only you could train them to concentrate on Grey Squirrels, Greenpeace would love you. And mink.

  5. By bringing you the prey, they’re acknowledging you as their mother (cat fathers tend not to hang around to raise their offspring). My entirely housebound cats occasionally bring me fluffy toys.

  6. I recommend:

    1/2 oz butter
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    1/2 pint dry white wine
    7 fl oz chicken stock
    some chopped fresh sage & parsley and seasoning

    Pan fry for colour, then in with the liquid and simmer until tender.

    Note: for the bunnies, not the kittens…

    I’d leave the mouse out, too!

  7. Monty:

    Recent curious news is that cats harbor a fungal disease of the brain known–histotoxoplasmosis (or reasonable facsimile)–which is also prevalent in birds and rodents and humans (particularly those who keep cats).

    The curious part is that the infection, in rodents, seems to counteract the natural fear reaction , making them easier prey for the cats. Unmentioned was whether birds were affected similarly. But in humans, the effect of infection is to make them like cats or like them more (and a very high percentage of cat-keepers are so infected). That’s one damn clever fungus!

  8. Gene,
    recent news is invariably curious. Give it scant regard. It is ephemeral, and of no consequence. Pay no attention to the tail and whiskers behind the curtain…

    Personally, I do not approve of humans keeping cats. And neither does my Master, who is already on his way to your house to scratch your eyes out, poop on your carpet, and climb up your curtains.

    As for clever fungi, I agree. They are indeed quite marvellous. Especially yeast, without which we would have no beer.

    Cheers!

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