3 comments on “Really? The French?

  1. The report said that poor wages and only basic training available to staff explained complaints of the “chronic incompetence of staff, or of a disagreeable or impersonal welcome”.

    One cannot overhear the statist rumblings for increasing the minimum wage (currently wiping out thousands of postal jobs in Germany) and developing government sponsored waiter education and training programs.

    Strange no one’s making a mint as a waiter in US but you usually get a smile with your beer.

    Tim adds: Well, I dunno about that. I used to be a waiter in the US and in the mid 80s (in mid 80s money) I was getting $700, 800 a week in take home for a 37 hour week, no split shifts. OK, I was in a high volume place and I was indeed a good waiter, but still. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if there were waiters and bartenders in hte big cities pulling down $80 k a year these days. That’s $300 in tips in a shift.

  2. One of the joys of travelling in France is the abundance of affordable, friendly, family-run hotels. I’ve probably stayed in well over a hundred of them over the years, and rarely had cause to complain.

    “By far the most frequent complaint about hotel rooms is lack of sound insulation.”

    Well, possibly: I spent a memorable night once in Perpignan, to the soundtrack of lovers rutting in the rooms on either side of me. It was an impressive display of Gallic bedroom stamina, but somewhat disconcerting for a chap stuck on his own.

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