Rosie Boycott

Is it actually worth reading more of this?

The Shock Doctrine is a book I\’ve long admired, and what came across on sharing a stage with Naomi Klein for the first time was what a stunning researcher and writer she is: an immensely impressive speaker with an incredible command of facts.

Klein? Command of facts?

Well, a little bit more.

The image that came into my mind was of companies like Halliburton and Honeywell soaring like vultures above our civilisation and looking for that dead body: when they see those disasters it\’s a mealticket for them.

Ain\’t that actually rather marvellous? Private companies maintaining the infrastructure to help and aid those in peril when disaster strikes?

14 comments on “Rosie Boycott

  1. The image that came into my mind was of companies like Halliburton and Honeywell soaring like vultures above our civilisation and looking for that dead body: when they see those disasters it’s a mealticket for them.

    One could make the same point about the various UN organisations, charities and other NGOs.

  2. You could equally say the same thing about newspapers. Misery and suffering are their bread and butter–and national disasters their jam on top!

  3. “Private companies maintaining the infrastructure to help and aid those in peril.”

    Like Haliburton in Iraq? Are you joking?

  4. You could even say the same for writers. They rarely write about happy married couples on a decent income with two delightful children.

    Not unless one is a paedophile or something.

    I have to say I need to stop reading the Guardian. It makes me think giving the vote to women was a mistake. It is not just the Guardian either – Alice Miles in the Times, in fact pretty much every woman writing for the Times, a good chunk of the Telegraph as well, and of course the entire Independent. I wonder if I can see the Guardian for making me more sexist? It is not that *all* women are like that – I don’t feel the need to suck up but actually the female bloggers on this site are usually better than the men. It is just that obviously you have to be a moron to be a Public Figure of the female persuasion. Which makes me think, was Mrs Thatcher always so sensible or did she grow into it?

    Anyway Ms Boycott is not doing her Sisters any good at all.

  5. If I recall correctly, Rosie Boycott chose, as part of the BBC’s “Greatest Britons” poll, to champion the cause of Princess Diana. She also branded Isambard Kingdom Brunell, a candidate for the title, as “Bob the Builder”.

    The woman is an idiot.

  6. “Like Haliburton in Iraq? Are you joking?”

    It is hardly Haliburton’s fault that some medieveal savages keep on blowing up things in their own country.

  7. I’ve not been able to take Klein seriously since Steyn pointed out that she’s a Canadian writer raging against globalisation in a British paper. What she advocates for other trades she doesn’t think should apply to her own, for some reason.

  8. Well, that’s the hallmark of the left – they are hypocrites.

    Plug multiculti for all it’s worth, abolish grammar schools, raise taxes for the NHS and ‘green’ issues, while living in leafy, white-dominated areas, sending the kids to private school, going Bupa for any illnesses and flying around the world whenever they choose.

  9. Julia:

    Hypocrisy isn’t a characteristic of the left–it’s a characteristic of humans in society, a “grease” like political correctness or even ordinary politeness and civility.

    I often marvel at how very “innocent” of hypocrisy are so many on the left, absolved by ignorance of the contradictions in their stated opinions. Of course, this is more true of the followers than of the leaders and pundits.

    And, of course, this phenomenon explains in great part the zealousness with which the left has pursued (and continues to pursue) dominance in fields related to indoctrination of the young: they are aware that their best audience is one unaware as possible that there may be anything amiss in their received worldview.

  10. Interesting you say that Gene. I was a lefty in my younger years, (now an avowed libertarian) and what you say rings true for me. Basically I was “cured” by being exposed to better arguments than I heard from those on the left. When I was a lefty I didn’t feel I was being hyprocritical. I was full of warm fuzzy sentiment, and it was only a good dose of economics and a bit of history which sorted me out. As a libertarian I find right wingers slightly less wrong than lefties on many issues, but often at least as hypocritical. Eg the state should not interfere with people by providing a welfare state, but should tell people what they can and can’t injest, and who they can and cannot get imtimate with.

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