James Hulme can kiss my hairy freckled arse

Sometimes ideas are so good yet so simple that you wonder why they haven\’t been enacted by the Government already. This is the case for the recently published proposals from James Crabtree and Frank Field MP to establish a compulsory civic service for young people in the UK. Whilst Hampstead liberals and professional harridans will no doubt balk at the idea, citing an abhorrent infringement of our young people\’s liberty, the scheme could spark a revival in civic pride and help to tackle unemployment, crime and anti-social behaviour.

It\’s slavery dimwit.

Now fuck off and dig out those black footy bags so you can play in the streets with Roddy Spode.

Jesus, where do these people come from? Did you ever in your puff see such a perfect perisher?

22 comments on “James Hulme can kiss my hairy freckled arse

  1. Where does this bizarre need for control come from? Or is it a notion that only the State can do good?

    Civic minded people don’t need telling what to do they get on and do it. Voluntarily.

  2. Gareth – That’s a silly straw man argument, private enterprise does good, that’s why us socialists let it continue. We simply ask your lot to acknowledge that the state isn’t entirely incapable of doing good itself.

    Tim – Is Germany a nation of slavers now? I thought slavery was the idea of a person could be owned as if they were piece of property.

  3. I can think of plenty, but let’s start with a simple one, the way we’re communicating which is through a network that runs on TCP/IP. A protocol developed by the US Military.

  4. Compulsory service of any kind will probably result in an officer class which would please the bossy.
    And what sort of punitive measures would be used on the uncooperative?

  5. I wonder who’s supposed to pay for this “scheme”, especially considering that compulsory military or civic services are being scaled back or completely abandonded in other countries due to the cost and inefficiency of such schemes

  6. “private enterprise does good, that’s why us socialists let it continue. ”
    Gee, thanks mate we appreciate your kindness. Although some might assume you let it continue to act as a piggy bank for you to raid to fund your hare brained schemes.

    “We simply ask your lot to acknowledge that the state isn’t entirely incapable of doing good itself.”
    No that is not “simply”all you ask. You also “ask” (read take) ~40% of the national wealth. Jesus Christ, with 40% of the national wealth I would expect the state to do some bloody good. Its just far more good would be done if most of that 40% was left in the pockets of the poor tax payer.

    “Tim – Is Germany a nation of slavers now? I thought slavery was the idea of a person could be owned as if they were piece of property.”

    That’s one defintion. Another is the idea that a person can be compelled to work, and furthermore get no recompense.

  7. “I can think of plenty, but let’s start with a simple one, the way we’re communicating which is through a network that runs on TCP/IP. A protocol developed by the US Military.”

    Interesting that the example you cite comes from the one area where the state does have any business being involved it, ie defence. Also, Mussolini made the trains run on time and Hitler liked children. I guess some good can be found in teven the most odious of regimes.

  8. Right-o then: the state has its booted foot on my neck in perpetuity, but at least I should be grateful because of TCP/IP.

    Of course, the state didn’t lay the fucking wires it ran over – it just stole them when it nationalized the phone companies. Ditto the creation of the National Grid, Martin.

  9. “TCP/IP. A protocol developed by the US Military.”

    Yes, well one thing the state does very well is control protocols.

  10. Kay Tie – National Grid/Wires is beside the point really, you asked for an example. I pointed out a little innovation that was state led and has enriched out lives in it’s own little way. There are pleny of others.

  11. “I pointed out a little innovation that was state led and has enriched out lives in it’s own little way. There are pleny of others.”

    Yes and generally provided at twice the cost for half the service that the private sector would have delivered it for.

  12. Andreas,

    My point exactly; and evidence of the state not laying the fucking wires – do wires fuck? How odd; then again, I was taught physics by the Jesuits – would be welcome.

    Here’s another one – nuclear power; you know, the stuff that was going to be ‘too cheap to meter’.

    Woops! Here’s another one – the defibrillator, invented by Frank Pantridge while at the Royal Victoria, Belfast; presumably part of the hated NHS.

    It is astonishing that those so ignorant of history, whose heads are so full of ideology and rubbish, should lack the humility required not to comment upon subjects of which they seem to know so little.

  13. If you think that the defibrillator and TCP/IP and a few other gewgaws justify throttling citizens by confiscating half the national income then you are deluded socialists (oxymoron alert).

  14. Talking of ignorance of history, Martin, go and read about the jet engine. Perfect example of state theft.

  15. You mean the jet engine that was invented by a serving officer in the RAF? Who developed the knowledge he used to build it after going on a state-funded officers’ engineering course?

    And I would hardly call the defibrillator a geegaw – I don’t wish to engage in emotional individualism, but the taxpayer leeching NHS drone, the unproductive waste of resources, who knew how to operate one saved my mother’s life.

    The development of the Spitfire, as recorded in ‘The Collapse of British Power’, is a perfect example of what can happen when the state doesn’t intervene int he production of technology. Thank God for the pilots.

  16. Yes, the RAF engineer who raised private capital to do the R&D because the RAF couldn’t see the point of a jet engine. Then when even a civil servant could see the point they confiscated the patents and gave them to Rolls Royce.

    But of course, to a statist the fact that someone receives training by the state means the state owns them like a slave for ever more.

    I never said the NHS was unproductive: it clearly does save lives (even if it kills more people with MRSA than die onthe roads). But it’s self-evident that the NHS is grossly inefficient and wastes resources like no private non-monopoly could. For every story of someone’s mother saved, there’s another story of negligence, incompetence and maladministration.

  17. As far as the NHS goes, it is also clear that there was a brief moment when science and medicine came together to do good. That was roughly from the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s with a strong weight to the later end.

    British medicine has not been doing a great deal in the way of progress ever since.

    Partly, if you believe James Le Fanu (and I find him convincing) this is because medicine took a social medicine route – that is they just want to bully us over eating too much fat rather than curing anything. Partly because of thalidomide which more or less ended independent research on medical conditions. But mostly, I expect, because the NHS is so bureaucratic that no one can do the sort of research that doctors used to do. It just took a little while for the paperwork to pile up.

  18. KayTie

    “Yes, the RAF engineer who raised private capital to do the R&D because the RAF couldn’t see the point of a jet engine. Then when even a civil servant could see the point they confiscated the patents and gave them to Rolls Royce.”

    Sources, please.

    “But of course, to a statist the fact that someone receives training by the state means the state owns them like a slave for ever more.”

    In the absence of sources, one can fairly assume that the Air Ministry’s behaviour was directly analogous to those private employers whose staff are required to sign contracts effectively donating their IP rights over everything they might develop while in service. Put another way – whenever Tim writes a ‘Thunderer’ column for ‘The Times’ does he own the copyright, or does News International?

    I do not know the answer; but then again, I am a statist dolt on the side of the leches and bloodsuckers, whereas you are an enlightened person who has sat driving tests in more than one country. You tell me.

    “But it’s self-evident that the NHS is grossly inefficient and wastes resources like no private non-monopoly could.” –

    The acronyms ‘RBS’ and ‘HBOS’ have just sprung to mind. Can’t think why.

    SMFS,

    I’ve not read Le Fanu’s thesis, so you have the advantage over me there – but his conclusion seems reasonable. It seems likely that having set up the NHS, government becme terrified when people started using it. Bevan’s resignation three years after its inception was the first inkling that it might be financially unsustainable – it would be completely rational to replace investment in progress with investment in preventative medicine. The Scottish Executive’s public health advertising might just be responsible for half of the country’s mental health problems.

  19. Here’s another one for you –

    “Governments, by and large, have little business running steel mills, and typically make a mess of it. (Although the most efficient steel mills in the world are those established and run by the Korean and Taiwanese governments, they are an exception).”

    Joseph Sitglitz, ‘Globalisation and its discontents, Page 54.

    “Now Stiglitz, fair play to him, has won both the Nobel prize and the John Bates Clark Medal; and even he doesn’t get it… in the pursuit of any endeavour, it is the how, not the who or the why, that makes the difference. ”

    Martin Kelly, December 12 2007

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