Those newspaper traffic numbers

We had all of this when we were trying to measure blog readerships.

Guardian.co.uk remained the most popular UK newspaper website with British web users last month with 11,882,653 domestic uniques, 36% of the total.

Remember the difference between (as defined by Google Analytics) uniques and absolute uniques?

A unique is one bod turning up on one day. If they turn up again on day two then that\’s a second unique. An absolute unique is one bod turning up at any time in the month. If they turn up again a second time in hte month that\’s not a second absolute unique.

I wonder which the G is claiming there? That over 20% of the adult population of the country turned up at the G site once in the month? Or that just under 400,000 turned up at least once a day over the month?

6 comments on “Those newspaper traffic numbers

  1. Unless the user logs into a personal account, the absolute unique measure must be flawed, as if it goes by IP address it cannot account for the same user connecting from different devices and ISPs.

    PS: Does everyone use Google Analytics to track visits these days? I remember when you had to grep through your own server logs. I disable Google Analytics in my browsers, so you can add one to your absolute unique total.

  2. Most of them are people like us going there to have a good laugh and poke fun at the lefties.

    I would guess that they will think that charging makes sense due to their numbers. Boy will they be in a for a shock.

  3. The problem is that different analytics providers sometimes use the same terms for different metrics, or use different terms for the same metrics. Until, and unless this is standardised accross the industry, then it is insufficient to merely cite X “Unique Users”. It is also important to define what a named metric actually means. Comparing Googles Uniques with Omnitures Uniques is comparing apples and oranges.

  4. Alexa has the Groan at 17 on the UK top 100, the Daily Mail at 23, Telegraph at 28, the Sun at 36 and The Times at 38, 1 place above YouPorn

    The top 3 all seem to have a similar reach, but the Groan, Telegraph and Times fare better than the Mail on page views – people actually read the broadsheets – and The Sun way out in front page views per user, which I guess comes from Sun ‘readers’ spending their days looking at the pictures.

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