Those with nothing to hide have nothing to fear

Oh yeah?

Mrs Elliott, 42, had her details logged on the police national computer after she was wrongly accused by her estranged husband of signing his name on the form.

She was arrested but cleared within 24 hours, and checks at the school found no evidence of wrongdoing. However, officers kept details of her arrest – effectively giving her a record.

Mrs Elliott disclosed yesterday how the “black mark” caused her to fail a security check and cost her a job working on the National Identity Card scheme.

Apart from the giggle that she cannot work on the ID scheme: here we have an allegation, quickly disproven, which now stays on the record and ruins her employment prospects.

No, this isn\’t about \”positive vetting\”: that\’s a very different and rather better procedure. For that is done by people with the competence to actually take account of allegations and whether they\’ve been proven (I don\’t think I\’ve been through a full positive vetting but I\’ve certainly had my files looked over a few times, as I should have done, in order to get things like Commons Passes and export import licences for nuclear materials and high end computers etc and there\’s certainly allegations on said files).

This is entirely to do with the stupidity of a system that maintains allegations as being proofs of misconduct.

2 comments on “Those with nothing to hide have nothing to fear

  1. “Mrs Elliott disclosed yesterday how the “black mark” caused her to fail a security check and cost her a job working on the National Identity Card scheme.”

    I’m sorry, Tim, but the irony is too much; this evil hag has had done to her what she was only to anxious to do to other people.

  2. Interestingly, the prospective employer has broken the law: only relevant details can be considered, and it’s hard to argue this is relevant.

    But yes, it’s a delicious irony.

    (By the way, the Daily Mail had a totally confused piece on this story about it being her entry on the DNA database that was disclosed)

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