Erm, Polly?

If the public sector asked you to stay in all day to wait for repairmen and parcels, there would be outrage.

As I recall when the telephones were indeed in the public sector it was necessary to stay in all month awaiting connection…..

But instead, public managers are told – against the evidence – that private managers are more dynamic and efficient.

The private sector is indeed more efficient: most notably for the reason that it abandons, sacrifices, those things which are not working faster.

Public jobs are tough. Running a local authority, or a beacon comprehensive or teaching hospital in a hard-pressed borough, takes more managerial talent than running any company.

Seriously? Running a protected monopoly is more difficult than running an organisation where competition comes at you from all sides?

Anyway, all of this proves that there should be a pay commission. Ho Hum.

But what surprised them was that education and skill could only account for less than half the difference in pay. The IFS confessed with \”some humility\” that there was simply no explanation for over half the rise in pay differences.

I\’ll clearly have to read that report but I can provide an explanation: globalisation. We\’ve increased the size of he market so that those who win in said market gain disproportionately.

Oooh, I\’d missed this. Polly says:

91% of wealth belongs to the top half of the population, most to the top 10%,

In the link to the IFS report which Polly herself provides we have:

The top 10% of wealth-holders have more than 44% of all wealth

Half of 91 is 45.5….and the top 10% have 44%. So the top 10% get a minority, not a majority or \”most\”.

12 comments on “Erm, Polly?

  1. I don’t knoe about taking more managerial talent but one thing is certain, the person running a local authority will have a much larger contingent of dopes, time-servers and lead-swingers to contend with than in a private company and with restricted powers to get rid of any of them.

  2. If the public sector asked you to stay in all day to wait for repairmen and parcels, there would be outrage.

    The public sector doesn’t deliver parcels or fix your washing machine (yet).

    However, they do deal with benefits claims. They do deal with funeral grants.

    What they don’t do is aknowledge a claim. They just leave you hanging. When you phone to see if the claim has arrived they say no.

    When you phone to see if the second claim has arrived they inform you it was filled out incorrectly.

    When you phone to see if the third claim has arrived they inform you that the time limit has expired.

    If this happened in the private sector you would have grounds to sue. In the public sector. Tough shit.

    Yet again, Polly is talking utter shite, simply because she has never had cause to actually use the Public Sector.

    Apologies if I have got this wrong, I only read the first sentence and my head went pop.

    Mummy x

  3. Interesting that she singles out “beacon” comprehensives for their demands – I suppose it’s having to dash out and throw logs on the fire.

  4. “The private sector is indeed more efficient: most notably for the reason that it abandons, sacrifices, those things which are not working faster.”

    I will bear that in mind next time I struggle for hours with the customer services departments at BT and Virgin trying to sort out my broadband connections.

    Tim adds: Obviously, not for internet connectsion but….I’m (just) old enough to remember the pre privatisation BT. Worse, believe me, much worse.

  5. There is a relative of mine who lives in a council house. When she makes an application for any necessary repair she is not told when, or even whether, the workmen are coming round. She is lucky in that being retired, she is usually at home.

    The waiting list for having a telephone installed in the old days was dire.

    And nowadays, anyone having construction work done has to pay workmen to stand around waiting for building inspectors to come and sign off on part of the structure (eg footings, sewage pipes) before the rest of the work can resume. My neighbour ended up paying five workmen to do nothing for three days, because “it’s the holiday season and all our inspectors are away until next week”.

    Most of our education sector is under the control of the county councils, who use the money to run cosy empires at county hall, and throw the schools the minimum amount of money they can get away with. The political elite have made schools un-governable by imposing their leftie notions of child-centred learning, and social engineering. Their standard response to criticism of ropey schools is to close the only good one, so no-one can make a comparison. If these dorks were running a corner shop they would stop charging money and give out the stock on the basis of need.

    Have any of our UK readers been able to get a swine-flu shot this winter? I can’t have one. I’m not in one of their “high risk” groups. And they have only ordered enough for those vulnerable folk. I don’t mind them getting their shots first. But I resent not being allowed to pay for mine after they have been served.

  6. Have any of our UK readers been able to get a swine-flu shot this winter? I can’t have one. I’m not in one of their “high risk” groups.

    Well, you don’t need one then, do you? *sheesh*.

  7. I will bear that in mind next time I struggle for hours with the customer services departments at BT and Virgin trying to sort out my broadband connections.

    Try a different provider, e.g. Zen.

  8. Funny. I once waited in for a health visitor who we were told would be along in the morning. They didn’t turn up, nor did we get a call to tell us this.

    Sadly, unlike the private sector, you can’t fire these people.

  9. Reminds me of the Russian joke:

    Back during the days of the Soviet Union, it took 10 years to get a car after you paid for one.

    Once, a young guy went to the car dealership to order a car.
    He paid the money, and the asked when can he come and get the car.

    “It will be here, waiting for you, exactly 10 years from today”.

    The man signed the papers, started walking away and then stopped, turned and asked the salesman: “Wait, will it be ready at the morning or at the afternnon”.

    “What difference does it make?”, asked the salesman.

    “Well”, answered the man, “the plumber is coming in the morning”.

  10. But instead, public managers are told – against the evidence – that private managers are more dynamic and efficient.

    Huh! Perhaps Polly’s never had this sort of conversation:

    Medical Consultant: Well, we can schedule your operation for June 2010

    Pa Remittance: Nothing sooner? I know this isn’t life threatening but it bloody hurts and makes getting around really difficult.

    Medical Consultant: Yeah, that sort of thing does that. The problem is all the theatres are fully booked until then. Sorry.

    Pa Remittance: I do have BUPA.

    Medical Consultant: Would next Tuesday be alright, Sir?

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