Neil Clark\’s mind boggling claim

We\’ve had healthcare in the hands of the voluntary and private sector before – prior to the creation of the NHS – and the result was that thousands died unnecessarily from diseases such as diphtheria and polio and infant mortality rates were around one in 20.

You what?

It is to laugh.

So the NHS is responsible for the worldwide fall in infant mortality is it? For Jonas Salk\’s polio vaccine?

Clark really is, as we all know anyway, a complete twat. That deaths from polio, diptheria and simply being born have all fallen everywhere is eveidence that there\’s nothing particularly special about the NHS model, of government owned and government financed health care.

It does show that having a heath care system helps in reducing avoidable deaths, yes, but given that almost no one else has an NHS like heath care system while everyone has seen falls in deaths from these causes we can\’t start running around stating that the NHS, as the NHS, is responsible for the falls.

12 comments on “Neil Clark\’s mind boggling claim

  1. The NHS became our State Religion because its formation coincided with the availability of penicillin. Simples.

  2. I had a conversation with an intensive care nurse a couple of years ago and she made pretty much the same claims. I pointed out that increased life expectancy and better general health were due more to clean water, diet and better housing than anything the NHS had ever done. Her response was irritation and bafflement.

  3. ……We had a railway sector in the hands of private operators before and the result was lots of smoke, because they used polluting coal rather than electricity…….

  4. Many of the big killers of humans were beaten back in the mid to late 19th Century, as governments, mostly local, improved sewage, drinking water supply, and as ordinary folks’ living standards rose as the Industrial Revolution gathered pace. It meant that people found it easier to maintain personal hygiene, wash their clothes, etc. Of course, the London smogs and other pollutants of water and air remained a problem for health right into the 20th Century, and if you look at what is now happening in China, a similar pattern is in place.

    To argue, however, that a state monopolist healthcare system run on almost Soviet lines is needed to combat illness is, well, batshit. But remember that Neil Clark is a hardline socialist, a defender of the likes of the former Serbian leader, Milosovic, serial defender of various socialist regimes. He also has paleo-con views on things like the death penalty.

    I would not waste much bandwidth on him.

  5. “Her response was irritation and bafflement.”

    Was she a nurse like ‘nurse’ Pilgrim (full-time union duties paid out of NHS funds), or ‘nurse’ like the young degree-laden lazy wasters, or a real nurse?

  6. I think it was on here that I read the pithy comment “the biggest single contribution a government can make to life expectancy and public health is to keep shit out of the drinking water”. So we should be praising the engineers Bazalgette and Brunel more than politician Bevan.

  7. Kay.
    She was, I thought, a ‘real’ nurse. I imagine they’re just so imbued, first at school ,and then later at work, with so much leftist BS that they don’t have much connection with facts any more.

  8. Okay, so polio and diptheria are thankfully things of the past, but this phenomenon is a global one. One thing we can count on howevber is the fact that babies do still die, perhaps not as frequently as in the past, but die they sadly do.

    So how does the British infant mortality rate (something I think we can credit to the NHS) compare with say that of the US or France or any other first world country? From what level did the NHS start and by how much (if any) has it reduced the rate of baby deaths? How does this compare to the same time frame in German, Canada, Spain wherever?

  9. My maternal uncle ( died aged 82 ) and aunt ( 87 ) both had diptheria in pre- NHS days and survived, anecdotal but just as meaningful.

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