Polly still gets this wrong

and property is greatly undertaxed compared with other countries.

This simply is not true.

Property tax as a percentage of total tax collected by the country.

The UK collects 11.9% of total tax revenue from taxes on property. This is the highest in the OECD and some twice the OECD average of 5.8%.

It might be that we tax property badly, that we don\’t tax really expensive property enough, all sorts of things might be wrong with the system. But it simply isn\’t true that we tax property lightly compared with other countries. Quite the opposite.

True, we don\’t have capital gains on first houses, we don\’t tax imputed rents for owner occupiers. But we do get over £25 billion each in domestic and business rates (except for one spot in Norfolk) and yes, those are taxes on property.

It\’s also fun to see Ritchie\’s figures mangled even more than he himself manages:

while some £25bn is evaded and £70bn avoided.

Other way around…..

6 comments on “Polly still gets this wrong

  1. Surely council tax is a tax on residence rather than a tax on property.

    You pay council tax whether you rent or own.

    I’m sure Polly means that the ownership of property is undertaxed. As a landlord you don’t pay council tax.

  2. You’ve made this point at least three times and each times the commenters have disagreed with you, partly for the reasons in comment 1.

    It would be nice if you or Polly would show any sign of learning new things.

  3. Tim is using the OECD definition of property tax. You may disagree with their definition, but you can hardly complain he’s being contrary by using OECD statistics.

  4. I’m not complaining he’s being contrary, I’m complaining that the data does not show what he wants it to show.

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