The fashion industry should not be allowed to sell us fake women\’s bodies

Think you might be a little confused dear.

We call it prostitution when women\’s bodies are rented out and slavery when they are sold, not fashion.

6 comments on “The fashion industry should not be allowed to sell us fake women\’s bodies

  1. I think the writer has forgotten that H&M are selling clothes, not bodies. There is no real difference between hanging clothes on plastic mannequins in real shop windows and hanging images of clothes on computer-generated mannequins in on-line shop windows.

  2. “… sell us fake women’s bodies…”

    If you bought a fake one, would you ask for your money back?

  3. Richard – “If you bought a fake one, would you ask for your money back?”

    Fake like Pamela Anderson fake?

    I think that question answers itself.

  4. I believe there’s quite a market in fake women’s bodies – the blow-up variety. Don’t think H&M sell them though.

  5. I think you are too harsh here — there is a very valid point that the models the fashion industry is using are selling or shall we say, forcing a body image to gullible young women who then make their life a misery trying to achieve the impossible.

    And why? Because it’s cheaper and easier to design for skinny people, curves wobble and introduce complexity into garment design. That’s why fat people look ugly because they end up having to wear scaled up designs for thin people.

    So, yes, the fashion industry is ‘selling’ a certain body image exclusively — and it’s not only fat people who are excluded from looking good (and thus feeling OK), but also ‘petite’ sizes, as their body metric is different to the standard model as their torsos tend to be shorter.

    Antidote: buy a sewing machine and learn how to tailor your own clothes, it’s not hard and takes about as much time as traipsing through the shops and ending up with a frumpy compromise.

    The only business model I can see work out for customers AND design houses for fitting clothes is to sell partially sewn garments(in different sizes of course) with instructions on how to easily customise them by adding darts and leaving the hems open so the customer can sew them to the proper length without it hanging down in waves — that’s the reason why tailors have a chalk line blower to mark the hem line where it actually falls.

    Either way, so many people not being able to dress without distress is not exactly contributing to a good mood in the nation(and let’s not think about all the wasted time people spend daily agonising which of their hideous mass-produced frocks is the least ugly today…)

  6. Hexe Froschbein – “I think you are too harsh here — there is a very valid point that the models the fashion industry is using are selling or shall we say, forcing a body image to gullible young women who then make their life a misery trying to achieve the impossible.”

    You’re a woman, right? What is the valid point? You would have to show that the fashion models have the slightest impact on gullible young women. You would then have to show that they are trying to look like said models. British women, indeed Western women, are, by and large, grossly obese so it is not obvious that either of these points is true, is it?

    “And why? Because it’s cheaper and easier to design for skinny people, curves wobble and introduce complexity into garment design.”

    That is why they like thin fashion models, but that says nothing about the clothes they wear. Indeed the big labels no longer make any real money on clothes at all. They are not designing clothes for anyone. Rather they make their money by putting their label on t-shirts, sun glasses, perfumes and the like. The clothes only exist to attract media attention and provide free publicity.

    “That’s why fat people look ugly because they end up having to wear scaled up designs for thin people.”

    No, fat people look ugly because fat people are ugly. It is inherent to the nature of being fat.

    “So, yes, the fashion industry is ‘selling’ a certain body image exclusively”

    You continue to say this as if it were true. Why?

    “The only business model I can see work out for customers AND design houses for fitting clothes is to sell partially sewn garments(in different sizes of course) with instructions on how to easily customise them”

    By the customers would reject this. Women need something to aspire to. Something that only a few people can achieve. Just as we do not admire people who can run marathons in an average time. Or men who can shoot an ordinary number of goals from safe positions in front of the goal. We admire the extraordinary. Rightly so too.

    “Either way, so many people not being able to dress without distress is not exactly contributing to a good mood in the nation”

    What is the evidence for that? Women love looking at thin girls. They demand them in the media. It is not men that like Kate Moss. Men like women with curves. There are rare women who appeal to both men and women – Kelly Brook for instance – but on the whole fashion models look like they look because that is what women want to look at.

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