A new species is born

Somewhere among the dairy farms and forested hillsides of Schmallenberg, a picturesque district of 26,000 people in central Germany, a deadly new virus was born.

Strange though that the usual biodiversity lot aren\’t out on the streets celebrating though, isn\’t it?

I mean we are told that Gaia\’s the organism, that all species have their part of play and that we most certainly must not judge such just by their value or not to man.

So, on the grounds of logical consistency I do hope we\’ll see the sea kitten people demonstrating against the plans to find a vaccine aginst this new species.

7 comments on “A new species is born

  1. The vaccine won’t kill it off, of course, just limit the harm to livestock and, potentially, humans.

    Closer to the arguments around culling badgers because of TB, I would think. Except badgers look cuddlier than viruses.

    Note to city people: wild badgers are not, in anything other than appearance, cuddly.

  2. Surreptitious Evil

    The vaccine won’t kill it off, of course, just limit the harm to livestock and, potentially, humans.

    That depends surely? If it is a spontaneous new species that exists just in sheep, goats and perhaps cows, then vaccinating those animals will kill it. If it has some wild reservoir it will be harder, if not impossible. But every virus needs a host. Vaccinate all the hosts and the virus becomes extinct. Which is what we did with rinderpest.

    Unless people listen to the Greens and protect the buggers a la Smallpox.

  3. @Thornavis.
    A common set of features that are normally ascribed to living entities are:

    Movement, Respiration, Sensitivity, Growth, Reproduction, Excretion, & Nutrition.

    I believe most viruses don’t do much more than reproduce.

  4. ChrisM, they don’t even do that. Their presence causes living cells to create copies of them. But you nailed it for the most part.

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