11 comments on “Telegraph subs: You naughty boys!

  1. When I was playing rugby in the olden days a try scored four points and a conversion added another two. Of course nowadays after all the mucking about with the rules who knows how the game is scored or even played?

    Cheers,
    Fatty

  2. @ Captain Fatty. Stripling! I was playing in the good old days of the 3 point try. The idea of the 4/5 pointer was to stop kicking for points and make the game more interesting. However, as a team needs to get into the opposing 22 5 or 6 times to be sure of scoring a try, teams have worked out that a possible 18 points from penalty kicks is better than a possible 7 points from the same effort. plus la change.

    Tim adds: I won’t claim I played in those days but there was a time when the try scored zero. Only the conversion racked up the points.

  3. Oh hey, the match was reffed by Wayne Barnes. After his shockingly poor performance reffing the SA vs Aussie match in the last World Cup, I’d believe almost anything. Maybe he decided to change how many points a try is worth – after all, he seems to like making up the rules as he goes along.

    (Note: As a kiwi, I was, obviously, hoping that both sides could lose in that game, so don’t think it was just because I didn’t like the outcome.)

  4. Obviously my last comment was meant to read “Wales” not “Aussie”. Feh. Although the actual SA vs Aussie game had shocking refereeing too. 🙂

  5. They scored a field goal but inflation and the conversion to the European standard caused it to be rounded up to four?

  6. Tim adds: I won’t claim I played in those days but there was a time when the try scored zero. Only the conversion racked up the points.

    Well of course – that’s why it’s called a try, it gives you the right to try for a goal. If you do so successfully you’ve converted the attempt into points. Of course, the Americans couldn’t handle that so they renamed it a “touchdown” – and then eliminated the actual touching down of the ball.

  7. “Well of course – that’s why it’s called a try, it gives you the right to try for a goal. ”

    I’d always assumed it was because it was worth three points!

  8. Back in the day, what we now know as a fullback was known as the back, there was one half-back and the three-quarters. Then Cardiff, if I recall correctly, started emplying a three-quarter to run swiftly past the half-back, receiving a pass en route, who became known as the flying-half…

  9. It was three points for a try when I played. And there was none of this bloody lifting your mates up in the line-in. And helmets were for poofters.

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