Let the conspiracy stories begin!

President Obama suffered his first setback since re-election yesterday when General David Petraeus, the Director of the CIA, resigned after confessing to an affair.

That the party of Clinton will fire someone over an affair is ludicrous.

General Petraeus was preparing to testify before a Senate hearing on the Benghazi attack next week, but Mr Morell will give evidence in his stead.

That\’s the story, there.

A head has already rolled: guess who is going to get all the blame, eh?

8 comments on “Let the conspiracy stories begin!

  1. So the conspiracy theory is what? That General P was going to Spill All (or at least some) and so the Obama administration forced him into retirement so that he could not testify?

    Well sure, but what is to stop him talking as soon as he is out the door? Can we expect a drone strike?

  2. Adultery in the military is a crime, although rarely prosecuted; see
    http://usmilitary.about.com/od/justicelawlegislation/a/adultery.htm

    The specific conditions are as follows.

    (1) That the accused wrongfully had sexual intercourse with a certain person;

    (2) That, at the time, the accused or the other person was married to someone else; and

    (3) That, under the circumstances, the conduct of the accused was to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces or was of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces.

    Petraeus is in clear breach: for someone that senior in the military to commit adultery certainly fulfills the third condition.

    More soldiers die from suicide than from enemy action. The most common reason for suicide is spousal adultery–while the soldier is away on duty for many months.

  3. Adultery in the military, here and there, has always been frowned on. Less of a problem now, but still career stalling. As is shagging up down the ranks. An infantry battalion adjutant of my acquaintance was caught shagging a corporal (female). He actually got her up the duff. He was and is a highly able and creative young (ish) officer but will never progress beyond Major (if he gets there – has been a captain for six or seven years now) and will never command a company.

  4. Surely he’s left the military now though? I thought – if there is more to it – it’ll be to do with confidential information.

  5. He was and is a highly able and creative young (ish) officer but will never progress beyond Major (if he gets there – has been a captain for six or seven years now) and will never command a company.

    Captain for 6 or 7 years – entirely normal. Infantry? Yes, he’ll command a company if he sticks it out to his RD job as a major (there being no other jobs for DE majors in an infantry battalion.) He may never command a battalion – but then that has always been the knives-in-the-back selection point (rather than mere promotion to Lt Col.)

    It’s not particularly shagging up and down the ranks (that was the point of the WRNS and WRAC, after all – to provide wives for those officers who weren’t in to nurses), it is shagging up and down the chain of command that is disapproved of in the UK mil. Of course, if she was an AGC clerk and he was her RO1, that’s slightly different …

  6. Surely he’s left the military now though? I thought – if there is more to it – it’ll be to do with confidential information.

    I also thought he had resigned to take the CIA job. But you have to remember that America is a nation that believes it was founded by Puritans and it hasn’t really shaken off some of the attitudes.

  7. If he was in charge of the cia could he not trump the fbi.
    Say prove she was an agent in traning. And maybe get the fbi in trouble.
    Is this not what the cia is said to be able to do about anybody.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>