Err, no, it ain\’t

It\’s not just that men don\’t understand women, it\’s that women don\’t understand men:

Emily Maitlis, the Newsnight presenter, says that when a man tells a woman how well they look, it’s often a euphemism for how fat they are.

No, it\’s much more basic that that. T\’ain\’t how fat or thin you are, it\’s whether you make the willy twitch or not.

Yes, animals, boors etc. Still true though.

17 comments on “Err, no, it ain\’t

  1. Well, maybe I’m out of the loop here, but generally if I tell someone they look “well”, it means they don’t look ill. Like, maybe they’ve been a bit under the weather, and now they aren’t. Or something. I can’t remember ever saying it either as a euphemism for their corpluence, or as a euphemism for priapism either.

    But that’s just me of course. YMMV and all that.

  2. So, men are responsible both for forcing magazines to print photos of emaciated women AND saying how fat they are?

  3. I would say she’s been playing Portal 2, but GlaDOS is a woman.

    “Hmm, you seem to have broken that Aperture Science jump-pad. It must have a weight limit.
    You look great, by the way. Very healthy.”

  4. I don’t know about most people, but I use “you’re looking well“* as a piece of lifemanship anyway.

    But then I’m not a very nice person.

    Having said that, remarking to a third person “doen’t she look <i<well“, usually does mean “…give you the horn.”

    *implication: “normally, you look like shit.”

  5. If a woman is deliberately starving herself to meet some media / fashion image of how she should look (and the current western narrative for that is ‘malnourished’) then an honest and accurate statement of “you look well”, as opposed to “you look horribly emaciated – have you got some nasty wasting disease or taken up heroin?” could easily be interpreted as “fatty, fatty, ha, ha!” by the terminally sensitive.

  6. f a woman is deliberately starving herself to meet some media / fashion image of how she should look (and the current western narrative for that is ‘malnourished’)

    hmm, I take you point, of course, but the average size for a woman in britain is, apparently, size 16.

    That’s not that malnourished. So whilst the media /fashion narrative is ‘scrawny lollipop’ (and not very nice) it doesn’t seem to filter down much.

  7. Does my bum look big in this?

    How can intelligent beings spout such utter crap. If someone says something nice to you, be happy, its not that difficult. If they want to insult you, force them to do it properly.

    How can anyone be so paranoid.

  8. (straight) men do not want women to be skinny, the fashion industry does. It’s a pressure put on women by other women and ‘stylists’. “You look well” is a polite way of saying you look good/cute/tasty/sexy etc without getting hauled before the thought police. Emily M is clearly a humourless cow…..funnily enough not eating enough not only makes you skinny, but cranky, humourless and boring, all of which are far more of a turnoff than a few extra pounds. But maybe that’s just me.

  9. but the average size for a woman in britain is, apparently, size 16.

    A size 16 is unlikely to be malnourished, I’ll agree but I’d like to see the shape of that distribution curve. I suspect it might be reminiscent of human females’ most prominent secondary sexual characteristics. Peaks at about 8 (maybe 10?) and 18?

    But I suspect that female media presenters, especially telly ones, are likely to come under more pressure to conform to the “supposed norm” than human beings.

    And I agree with Mark T – I suspect that part of the problem is it is easier to hang clothes on a clothes’ hanger. And there are insufficient straight blokes or gay girls in the industry to tilt the balance back from “convenient” to “attractive”. And then, of course, all of the glossy magazines have stick insects in them, so that becomes what is glamorous.

  10. It’s simply to the point that I don’t bother complimenting any woman I haven’t known for years.

    With all the aggrieved twats like Maitlis running around, there is no upside to doing otherwise.

  11. re@13
    It’s even worse than that, Dennis. Even when you have known them for years you get that sideways glance with the voiced or unvoiced “What exactly do mean by that?”

  12. Dennis The Peasant – “It’s simply to the point that I don’t bother complimenting any woman I haven’t known for years. With all the aggrieved twats like Maitlis running around, there is no upside to doing otherwise.”

    Well you have to be careful of aggrieved twats like this woman, but I complement more women these days than I used. Even total strangers on very rare occasions – which has never had a negative reaction. Maybe I just live in a nicer area than you do? It is one advantage of being old.

    I agree it goes to her serious paranoia and says a lot more about her than about men.

    I think it is a problem for heterosexual men these days because we seem to fall between two stools – the ideal of what women would like to look like (and some small percentage of women do) and the reality of what most women do look like. Which is to say, obese or verging on it. It is not that I care for the thin women of women’s magazines, but neither do I think fat-pride is advancing the cause of Western civilization.

  13. And I agree with Mark T – I suspect that part of the problem is it is easier to hang clothes on a clothes’ hanger. And there are insufficient straight blokes or gay girls in the industry to tilt the balance back from “convenient” to “attractive”. And then, of course, all of the glossy magazines have stick insects in them, so that becomes what is glamorous.

    That’s all that it’s about – stick thin girls wear clothes better. It’s not a conspiracy of straight or gay men, it’s just about the clothes, and how they are presented to fashion editors and buyers, who are mostly straight women.

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