And this is a surprise in what manner?

Hospitals treating Liverpool Care Pathway as just another \’thing to do\’
Hospitals are placing patients on the controversial “pathway” to death without proper training for staff or even understanding how it works, some of Britain’s leading specialists in care for the dying have acknowledged.


Take something difficult
, requiring great judgement and tact, that has been trialled on a small scale, then roll it out across an organisation 1.4 million people strong.

No, no, of course it won\’t descend from an alleviation of the pain of imminent death into a widescale bureaucratic slaughter of the inconveniently ill.

For that\’s just not how the real world works is it?

Tossers.

12 comments on “And this is a surprise in what manner?

  1. If euthanasia were free on the NHS, the method used would be withdrawal of fluids and over prescription of opiates.

    In other words, the LCP.

    But the LCP isn’t euthanasia, oh no siree!

  2. This is a colossal scandal, yet criticism of it is almost taboo among the establishment. The numbers involved are staggering.

  3. The hourly ward rounds will probably kill more people. Take a small problem, apply a rigid rule with no understanding of the issues and end up with unintended consequences. Why do some patients end up not being trated well? Because another patient is in more critical need – now if we make hourly ward rounds compulsory, the critically ill person falls in priority. Wunderbar

  4. It’s no surprise. No surprise at all that the Telegraph have twisted this story (again). If you read a little more closely, the concerns are over communication, nothing more.

  5. So we tell the world we kill our old people. Hey, why does no-one else want to copy the NHS? Could it be they find some of its ideas, attitudes and actions to be at the very least distasteful?

  6. I wrote a book about a dystopian future where the British state killed old people at the rate of 25,000 a year.

    According to the press the LCP is now killing 130,000 annually.

  7. According to the press the LCP is now killing 130,000 annually

    That’s an estimate of the number of people who die each year on the LCP. But that’s not what kills them.

    About 450,000 people a year die in bed in the UK. Let’s abolish beds.

  8. Thomas Gibbon – “I wrote a book about a dystopian future where the British state killed old people at the rate of 25,000 a year. According to the press the LCP is now killing 130,000 annually.”

    Yeah. If you had written it a little earlier, no one would have believed you. It just goes to show that the Trad Cons were right in many ways. You change one little thing, you change the whole of society. As Chesterton said:

    In the matter of reforming things, as distinct from deforming them, there is one plain and simple principle; a principle which will probably be called a paradox. There exists in such a case a certain institution or law; let us say, for the sake of simplicity, a fence or gate erected across a road. The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don’t see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don’t see the use of it, I certainly won’t let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it.”

    This paradox rests on the most elementary common sense. The gate or fence did not grow there. It was not set up by somnambulists who built it in their sleep. It is highly improbable that it was put there by escaped lunatics who were for some reason loose in the street. Some person had some reason for thinking it would be a good thing for somebody. And until we know what the reason was, we really cannot judge whether the reason was reasonable. It is extremely probable that we have overlooked some whole aspect of the question, if something set up by human beings like ourselves seems to be entirely meaningless and mysterious. There are reformers who get over this difficulty by assuming that all their fathers were fools; but if that be so, we can only say that folly appears to be a hereditary disease. But the truth is that nobody has any business to destroy a social institution until he has really seen it as an historical institution. If he knows how it arose, and what purposes it was supposed to serve, he may really be able to say that they were bad purposes, that they have since become bad purposes, or that they are purposes which are no longer served. But if he simply stares at the thing as a senseless monstrosity that has somehow sprung up in his path, it is he and not the traditionalist who is suffering from an illusion.

    I wonder what would have happened if people had told the soldiers we dragged off to fight in Europe that in their twilight years they would be drugged up and deprived of water until they died of thirst.

    But of course Gay marriage, or uncontrolled Third World immigration, or the on-going dumbing down of the education system, none of these will have any unforeseen consequences, right?

  9. Wise words from Chesterton. So perhaps there’s a reason why experts have spend 15 years developing the Liverpool Care Pathway, building on experience in Hospices.

    I realise that SMFS has got a lot on his mind, what with having to put up with people of dark complexion in the country, and the possibility that people of the same sex may be allowed to marry each other, but might I suggest that he put some of his energies into volunteering at a hospice. Then when he’s got some understanding of what’s involved in care of the dying, he can come back to us with his proposals for improving it.

  10. PaulB – “Wise words from Chesterton. So perhaps there’s a reason why experts have spend 15 years developing the Liverpool Care Pathway, building on experience in Hospices.”

    Perhaps there is. And perhaps there is a reason why they are throwing out 2000 years of Western ethics on the subject of caring for the dead in exchange for what looks like a quick turn over of beds.

    But even if they had put a lot of thought in to the pathway – all evidence to the contrary – there is plenty of evidence they have not put much effort into explain it or making it work properly.

    “I realise that SMFS has got a lot on his mind, what with having to put up with people of dark complexion in the country, and the possibility that people of the same sex may be allowed to marry each other, but might I suggest that he put some of his energies into volunteering at a hospice. Then when he’s got some understanding of what’s involved in care of the dying, he can come back to us with his proposals for improving it.”

    What makes you think I haven’t already? Nor do I think there is any mystery about what is involved in caring for the ill and the aged – not the dying because doctors can’t know that for sure. Well, not if they do not intervene at any rate. Caring for the dying involves things like giving them a damn glass of water from time to time. You know, the little details that the Big Picture people who run the NHS don’t give a flying f**k about.

  11. What makes you think I haven’t already?…Caring for the dying involves things like giving them a damn glass of water from time to time.

    The nonsense you write about it. The LCP certainly does not countenance refusing to give dying patients water to drink, so if you are concerned that that may happen you should be in favour of the LCP.

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