Hang a bureaucrat today

And another tomorrow:

Alessandro Torello, of the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers, said the MEPs’ rules would create a costly and cumbersome regulatory process that would make industry think twice about exploration.

“The text adopted today would require undertaking long and complex environmental studies at a very early stage in the exploration phase, undermining – without bringing additional environmental benefits – the efforts to develop domestic oil and gas opportunities, such as gas from shale,” he said.

“This would erode EU attempts to encourage future economic growth and create new jobs while simultaneously depriving policy makers of one key tool they could use to reduce Europe’s dependence on energy imports.”

François Hollande, France’s Socialist president, has banned fracking his country. The MEPs’ vote was welcomed by Greens and Socialists.

“While this would not prevent permits from being granted, it will help prevent risky shale gas projects being bulldozed through in spite of environmental concerns,” said Sandrine Bélier, a French Green MEP.

Later this year, the European Commission is expected to propose tough regulations for fracking amid fears in Brussels that cheap shale gas could wipe out heavily subsidised and less efficient renewable energies such as wind farms.

Jos Delbeke, the director-general of the commission’s “climate action” department, hinted that the EU would use the regulations to defend renewable energy against cheaper shale gas.

“A minus scenario is that shale gas then drives out renewables,” he said, last week. “If ever shale would become as cheap as in the US, we really would have a problem. We are strong defenders of renewables. It is very important we keep investing in renewable technologies.”

Actually, let’s just hang them all shall we?

12 comments on “Hang a bureaucrat today

  1. Hang all those who think that we must cut back to change the climate when in reality we haven’t changed the climate. The climate is changing, but it’s easier and cheaper and better to adapt to any change which will take a long time than to suddenly cut back to the Middle Age energy levels literally tomorrow.

  2. “If ever electric lights would become as cheap as in the US, we really would have a problem. We are strong defenders of candles. It is very important we keep investing in candle technologies.”

    Hanging’s too good for the fuckers. Make them fight lions in the Coliseum.

  3. Choo, choo!

    That’s the noise of a gravy train coming down the track for Environmental Assessment consultants.

    The first report will be difficult to do and the bureaucrats will be all over it to pick holes.

    But since bureaucrats are fundamentally lazy they won’t notice that Environmental Assessment Report 2 is just a cut n paste job from EAR 1, and so forth.

  4. This sort of thing is already happening in Austria. Just up the road ( well 20 miles ) was a test fracking site run by OMV. They were told to conduct another ( after numerous had already been carried out ) environmental impact assessment before they could carry out any more exploratory drilling.

    OMV said they couldn’t be arsed and pulled out.

    They calculated that there was enough gas in that field to keep Austria self-sufficient for 20 years.

    My village is conducting a Burgerinitiativ to prevent a windpark from being built nearby. The wind company calculate that the windmills would run for 2,500 hours per year. I think you can work out the efficiency rate in your heads. The ROI is over 13 years but subsidies are of course paid upfront.

    I am in the UK at the moment and just saw Michael Fallon make a twat of himself on Sky by getting the Green taxes on our energy bills wrong.

    It is so depressing. The Czechs haven’t caught this disease yet, Tim, but it’s just a matter of time.

  5. Lets see, the EU is nailing its colours to the mast for dear energy, which of course means dear everything.
    They may find, as Mr. Milliband has found, that rising living costs are unpopular, and will likely respond as Mr. Milliband has by blaming energy companies. This will resut of course in less energy production, and power cuts- I doubt they will be popullar either.
    There is a reaasonable chance that the EU will piss enough people off to bring about its own demise.
    Especially if the “pause” in globall warming continues, or indeed if it gets colder.

  6. “They [the EU] may find, as Mr. Milliband has found, that rising living costs are unpopular”

    Well, so they may; but the great thing about the EU is that it it doesn’t matter. No elections, see? Nobody can sack them, so they can just do whatever they like.

    And this, as we know, is a feature, not a bug, as proven by innumerable quotes from toads like Barroso, Delors, Schumann, etc going back to the dawn of “the project”

  7. Hollande banned fracking? I didn’t know that.

    I presume he also favors burning witches, which has a similarly compelling scientific justification.

  8. are you aware of the example of Emed plc, which has spent 6 years and the thick end of £100m trying to re-open the Rio Tinto mines, in an area of Spain with massive unemployment levels, caused mainly by the closure of the mine 15 or so years ago? I hope your Czech venture gets an easier “regulatory” ride.

  9. They may find, as Mr. Milliband has found, that rising living costs are unpopular, and will likely respond as Mr. Milliband has by blaming energy companies. This will resut of course in less energy production, and power cuts- I doubt they will be popullar either.

    Yes, but that will be blamed on deregulation, not on the price ceiling.

  10. In my experience most EU policy makers engage in what I like to call “Decision Based Evidence Making”. They start with the policy they want to achieve and work backwards from there. And we can see how well that works from the Euro.

    Of course how this backing of renewable energy is consistent with banning cheap solar panels from China is a mystery to me.

    Still the best thing is that this decision will hand a competitive advantage to the US of A for while which is probably a good thing (despite the political nonsense going on there you the private sector will just get on with making money)

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