16 comments on “Dear Lord above

  1. The state thinks any action against the state is terrorism, so it makes perfect sense from their point of view.

  2. heh
    since broon combined Customs and inland Revenue we’ve been sliding inevitably towards a sump of stinking ordure.

    The two mentalities combined are more than the sum of the parts….

    Of course they won’t use any powers to go after the big, politically connected thieves – they’ll use their powers to go around arbitrarily flattening tiny bugs at great expense and demanding more funding and more drones at every turn.

    It’s long past time the tax authorities had sanctions that hurt for getting it wrong – something that they do routinely with the UK’s self employed and small businesses.

    P45, a fine and 48 hours in the stocks / pillory would be a start for individuals in public (state) employ who perpetrate willful harm on the innocent.

    How come these shits see themselves as “the state” – when they are public servants?

    Huhne is a toxic shitweasel of epic proportions….

  3. Given the expenses scandal and other cases, it would only be fair for GCHQ to start with tapping MP’s phones, tracking their online activities, and monitoring their bank accounts, in order to reassure us of their honesty.
    After all, I suspect a greater % of MP’s has been proved dishonest than the general population.
    I look forward to Huhne proposing such a measure.

  4. Alex

    IIRC wasn’t the chap who handed the expenses DVD to the Telegraph a gent with one foot in the spook camp? (ex Hereford )

    I mean… Huhne was professing surprise that he (as an MP) was being lobbied for extra spook funding to do “new” stuff that “they” were already doing anyway … in secret…

    There are historical precedents for spooks pulling the strings to get things the way they want them all over.

  5. TimO

    It’s long past time the tax authorities had sanctions that hurt for getting it wrong – something that they do routinely with the UK’s self employed and small businesses.

    I’m doing some contract work for DCMS and they share the HMRC building at 100 Parliament Street. The HMRC people have things all over the place saying how the will treat us “Customers”. It drives me mad. I feel like grabbing them all round the throat and screaming “I am not your customer I am a tax payer. I have no choice in the matter and make payments under threat of violence. Don’t be so effing condescending”

    One day……

    I also like to tell my colleagues, they think jokingly, that when the revolution comes we’re selling the place as a hotel or office and they can all go and work in Grimsby.

  6. Can I bring a prosecution against the Liberal Democrats for their abuse of the word ‘Liberal’?

    they’re only doing what apparatchiks have done since the dawn of time and getting rid of the tricky bit in the title. See also the People’s Democratic Republic of China and the New Economics Foundation.

  7. But there are some specific areas of criminality where we might have to think of using sources like tapping phones or so on. Things like Missing Trader VAT fraud where criminals siphoned off literally billions and moved it out of the country.

  8. “It’s long past time the tax authorities had sanctions that hurt for getting it wrong – something that they do routinely with the UK’s self employed and small businesses.”

    The original HMRC used to be a bastion of probity and competence and a letter from an HM Inspector of Taxes saying “We’re coming to see you Friday” was something genuinely to be feared, because back in the day they knew their stuff and had a full assessment case-load to deal with.

    It was not the merger with HMRC that started the rot, it was “self assessment”. This gradually whittled away the real skills of HM Inspectors as their jobs became more nebulous and faceless. The merger with HM Customs and Excise just provided a way out via generous redundancy packages and early retirement.

    Most of the decent staff saw the writing on the wall (pacesetter, lean / process improvement, etc.) and knew full well that this was square pegs and round holes. The Inland Revenue were considered to be a “gentlemanly” branch of the civil service, not like the thugs in HM Customs and Excise.

    The real reason for the merger was that the thugs of HM Customs and Excise had been caught doing umpteen naughty things (including entrapment) and to hide the mess under the carpet and allow a re-branding the merger was cooked up by some bright young things in Gordon Brown’s treasury days. Ed Balls certainly has his hands dirty.

    So all the skilled staff with decades of knowledge were allowed to walk out of the door because the bright young things didn’t need them any more, they had computers and internet and web-filing.

    Hence chaos ensued and has consumed HMRC ever since. All the fancy computer gear in the world won’t avail them as our tax system is too complex and subject to interpretation.

    If we started fining HMRC for their mistakes or compensating taxpayers for HMRC errors then HMRC would be broke in a month.

  9. John G

    “If we started fining HMRC for their mistakes or compensating taxpayers for HMRC errors then HMRC would be broke in a month.”

    now that’s an indictment sure enough!

  10. Probably counter productive though as HMRC is setup to make mistakes, not learn lessons. One of those circumstances where an organisation is so shit that it is better to wind it down and start a new one from the ground up.

    Never happen though, politicians haven’t got the balls.

  11. More to the point why is the Graunidad giving money to this criminal to write pieces like this? He should be working as a greeter in the local Tescos and his opinion limited to to whatever mates he can scrape up in the local pub.

  12. Given councils use anti-terror (so called) laws to spy on people to ensure they recycle, it’s perfect logical.

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