11 comments on “Timmy elsewhere

  1. This is the same RSPCA that snatched a disabled dog (with a clean bill of health from a government vet) from a rival charity and threatened to put it down, before being backed off by a huge backlash..?

    Time their charitable status was revoked and their quasi-police powers were stripped from them.

  2. JuliaM – “Time their charitable status was revoked and their quasi-police powers were stripped from them.”

    I wonder if it is time to do a Henry VIII? We have a debt problem. The Left has been bleating for years about sharing the burden. I wonder what sort of reserves the RSPCA has salted away against a rainy day? Perhaps it is time to raid the endowments of all the Left Wing “charities” in the UK in order to help the homeless etc etc (ie pay down the debt)?

    What I wouldn’t give to see Harvard’s endowment nationalised and evened out across all the universities in America.

  3. It is worth noting that the RSPCA was never set up to do charity work; it was created on the same model by much teh same people as groups like The Society For The Prosecution Of The Unspeakable and so forth, as a political organisation who would prosecute persons under existing laws and lobby for new ones. One of the major parts of the Victorian whiggish/reform mob was to get a general “charitable” status applied to their political front groups, so that the air of virtue surrounding genuine charity would work in their interests.

    In other words, being a bunch of self-interested, smug prodnoses was always their purpose for existence. I say this just because there is a popular meme that these hegemonic charidees have somehow gone off the rails of late, whereas they are in fact what they always were intended to be, which is extra-governmental political operations.

  4. Also, me being me, I can’t let it pass mention that the original motivation was religious, hence the SPCA emerging from the bowels of the Clapham Sect and William “Societies Against Vicey Things” Wilberforce, who was of course a notorious methodist.

    It all came out of the Sunday thing; traditionally sunday was the only day when the proles could take pleasure, and animal sports- bear baiting, cock fighting, stapling chimpanzees to donkeys, etc- were a major part of that. So the idea was to use a anti-cruelty narrative to make sure there was one less thing to do on sunday other than go to church. Same idea as closing all the shops on sundays, and so on.

  5. What “quasi-police powers”? They don’t have any. No entry, seizure or police arrest. They pretend to and, for various reasons, certain police forces acquiesce.

    They can apply for seizure warrants and conduct private prosecutions. They can conduct a “citizens arrest” – merely detain a person caught in the commission of a crime until police arrive (under s24A of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1974). So can any individual or private organisation.

  6. We probably ought to ban them from wearing uniforms (we have a law, specifically implemented to tackle the blackshirts) and it would be nice to get them on the “impersonating a police officer” thing. That and the TV licence bastards.

  7. Ian B – “It is worth noting that the RSPCA was never set up to do charity work”

    Really? I would have thought rescuing sick and maltreated animals was more or less a standard definition of charity work. The problem is what they have become, not what they were originally intended to do.

    “One of the major parts of the Victorian whiggish/reform mob was to get a general “charitable” status applied to their political front groups, so that the air of virtue surrounding genuine charity would work in their interests.”

    Where was the political mileage in preventing cruelty to animals? You know, before it became a proxy for the class war.

    Ian B – “Also, me being me, I can’t let it pass mention that the original motivation was religious, hence the SPCA emerging from the bowels of the Clapham Sect and William “Societies Against Vicey Things” Wilberforce, who was of course a notorious methodist.”

    Yeah. Bastards. Imagine being against slavery. Which was, I suppose, quasi-political activity in so far as they forced Brazil to stop trading or go to war.

    “It all came out of the Sunday thing; traditionally sunday was the only day when the proles could take pleasure, and animal sports- bear baiting, cock fighting, stapling chimpanzees to donkeys, etc- were a major part of that.”

    Funny they did not go for horse racing then. Or the dogs.

    Ian B – “We probably ought to ban them from wearing uniforms (we have a law, specifically implemented to tackle the blackshirts)”

    The Salvation Army too?

  8. Why bring up slavery? I mentioned nothing about it in my comment.

    Flanking attacks are good tactics 🙂

  9. Ian B – “Why bring up slavery? I mentioned nothing about it in my comment.”

    You mentioned “William “Societies Against Vicey Things” Wilberforce” and you think that was not about slavery? What was it about?

    The Victorian conscience was a great thing we shall miss. It did give us the RSPCA. Which meant well although it now should be abolished. But what Wilberforce will always be remembered for is the abolition of slavery. You know, one of those Societies for Repressing Vicey Things.

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