Quite right too

Pope Francis baptises baby of an unmarried couple in the Sistine Chapel during Baptism Of The Lord mass at the Vatican

Pope Francis was conducting Baptism Of The Lord mass today
He baptised 32 children, including one of unmarried parents
Francis has supported baptising the children of unmarried mothers


Pretty standard
stuff of course. It’s the baby’s soul at issue, not whatever sins its parents may or may not have committed.

Of course, you can indeed say that you’ve no interest in all this Sky Fairy stuff, but it has always been true that within the Church, baptism is indeed about the child being baptised, nothing else.

Priests who have refused have been doing very much the wrong thing.

13 comments on “Quite right too

  1. Yet you’ll have the warring factions claiming that the Pope is either dragging Rome out of the 16th Century or abandoning generations of Catholic teaching. Or both.

  2. Priests are indeed supposed to believe in the Sky Fairy, so priests are supposed to realise it’s the baby being baptised.

    I agree with SE though; there will be factions, there will be blood. Why? Because these days priests get their theology from the Guardian or the Mail, depending.

  3. How can it be news that the Pope enunciates Christian doctrine?
    I suppose it would be “discrimination” for the Mail to hire a Christian as its religious affairs advisor (even more so to hire a team of consultants including a Christian, a Muslim and a Jew as well as the compulsory atheist).

  4. JamesV

    “Also places with church taxes treat this as a contract that legally binds the infant for life.”

    You must know that is tosh. You elect whether to be counted as a Catholic when you reach voting age. Iy you decline, you still get taxed, it just doesn’t go to the CC.

  5. That’s in Italy. In Germany you’re liable for church tax from baptism until you pay a fee to register your leaving the church. You are still then liable forever unless you can prove you left the church.

    The churches (especially the proddies) are currently doing a roaring trade in the east – chasing people who were baptised there during DDR times and left the church in the way one did there, at that time, by not turning up any more (there was no church tax in the DDR so no one much cared about paperwork). Turns out that since these people cannot provide documentary evidence that they went to the town hall and formally left the church officially, they have to pay up to 7 years back taxes to the church.

    How Christian of them.

  6. Surreptitious Evil – “Yet you’ll have the warring factions claiming that the Pope is either dragging Rome out of the 16th Century or abandoning generations of Catholic teaching. Or both.”

    No you won’t. Because at the BBC they will believe the former no matter what the evidence is. And no one with three brain cells and the slightest knowledge of Catholic teachings will believe either.

    Has there ever been a single case where a Catholic priest has *ever* refused to baptise a bastard baby? I mean, it is usually the Micks getting stick for sneakily baptising Indians or Chinese babies or something without permission. They are a little baptist-happy.

  7. JamesV

    Unless you have paid the correct fee you cannot be de-registered as JamesV and re-registered as Bloke in Germany.

  8. No you won’t. Because at the BBC they will believe the former no matter what the evidence is. And no one with three brain cells and the slightest knowledge of Catholic teachings will believe either.

    Surprising as it may seem to you, neither the BBC nor educated Catholics form the entirety of the global commentariat.

    Has there ever been a single case where a Catholic priest has *ever* refused to baptise a bastard baby?

    I have no personal knowledge of the matter but Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Buenos Aires seemed to think so. He may have learned better over the last 18 months or so.

  9. I too have no personal knowledge, but am quite prepared to believe that in some parts of the world the Church has driven people away for just that reason…and then wondered why young people don’t accept his perfect love. The difference between his love and their own will never dawn on them.

  10. Surreptitious Evil – “Surprising as it may seem to you, neither the BBC nor educated Catholics form the entirety of the global commentariat.”

    I did not say educated. I said people with three brain cells. I agree they do not sum up the entire world. But they are likely to nearly exhaust the number who gives a damn.

    “I have no personal knowledge of the matter but Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Buenos Aires seemed to think so. He may have learned better over the last 18 months or so.”

    Why on Earth would you think Frankie thinks so?

    Ironman – “I too have no personal knowledge, but am quite prepared to believe that in some parts of the world the Church has driven people away for just that reason…and then wondered why young people don’t accept his perfect love. The difference between his love and their own will never dawn on them.”

    Who is doing the wondering? There are no grounds for refusing illegitimate children baptism if the parents want it. Given the Church’s long record of baptising people who may or may not want it, it is absurd to think they have done a back flip in recent times.

    At best they may want the parents to show that they are serious about the child being raised a Catholic. Which seems reasonable. They are under no obligation to make a mockery of their own beliefs.

  11. @ SMFS
    The Church includes the Roman Catholic Church but that is not the entirety of the Church.
    “There are no grounds for refusing illegitimate children baptism if the parents want it.” Yes IF the Church is satisfied that the parents and godparents are sincere in making their vows. However it does *not* have to take part in a charade where the parents just want a “Christening party” and have no intent of living up to the promises they make during the service, so it can refuse if the parents are insincere. My current parish is one of many that require parents asking for baptism to attend a brief training course to teach them the implications of the vows that they make during the baptism service. It does *not* require them to be married but it *does* ask them to understand the vows and to be sincere when they make them.
    Oh, and we don’t demand that they must be brought up as Anglicans, just be given the chance to become Christians.

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