Bollocks!

If there was a single undisputed truth in Britain in the decades after the Second World War, it was that there was going to be a rising middle class.

Complete piffle.

Agreed that that is how it worked out but it’s most certainly not how everyone thought it was going to be.

For, if they had, then they wouldn’t have gone off and indulged in Marxist fantasies about the dictatorship of the proletariat like your own dear father now, would they Ed?

You twat.

16 comments on “Bollocks!

  1. Haven’t we established that Ralph was Chief Scout, Archbishop of Canterbury, a member of the MCC and dropped regularly down the pub for a couple of punts of bitter? Thus ahistorical waffle about him being some sort of ivory tower International Marxist academic is pure revisionism.

  2. I remember one of my history teachers saying that if you were ever completely blindsided by an era of history about which you knew nothing, you could always say

    “this period saw both profound upheavals in religious thought and the emergence of a new middle class”.

    It’s a sort of historical Barnum statement.

  3. There was plenty of post-war optimism and aspiration. Some of that energy was directed towards the politics of envy and class in an effort to achieve a degree of power or influence. Arguably more – particularly women – sought to move up and out, into middle class respectability. A third of the working-class girls I went to school with became teachers and married up – made sure their kids were decently educated and even more socially mobile. If you were that teacher and your husband a solicitor, your sons became doctors and barristers. The trouble with social mobility, however, is that it’s a two-way street.

  4. The forties was still an era of class warfare with any worker’s window that dared to show a Conservative poster likely to get broken by a thrown half-brick. The fifties were a period of rising prosperity for all but particularly for the working class with a narrowing of differentials in wealth and income.
    The early sixties under MacMillan, not the forties under Attlee, saw a major expansion of university education (East Anglia, Keele, Strathclyde, Sussex, York all opened in 1961-4, Newcastle expanded and became independent of Durham, and Bath, Bradford, Brunel, Ciy (of London), Dundee, Essex,, Heriot-Watt, Canterbury, Loughborough,Stirling, Surrey, and warwick) started building in those years. Only one university opened under Attlee and two in the mid-/late-50s.
    Millionaireband is trying to rewrite history.

  5. You are missing the obvious: that Ed Miliband is making a well researched move to re-position Labour electorally as the party of the middle-classes. Could work.

  6. The impression I get from reading stuff written around the end of WWII was, the future would be not so much middle class as classless. I don’t thing there was much appetite, after a war where much of class distinctions had been put aside, to return to a rigid class divide.
    No doubt why Miliband Senior was so hell bent on recreating them. Ditto the Attlee government. The NHS wasn’t an error.

  7. Well researched? Since when did research matter to the Marxiband family, pere ou fils?

    I read here rebuttal after rebuttal, all factually accurate. So no, I don’t anybody is missing anything, not even young Mr Milliband, who learnt his history from Marxists. It seems he learnt well; history is to be re-written to suit whatever shit you happen to be spreading today; hang the facts.

  8. To be fair, DBC, it’s not natural to overcome the English convention of doubling L’s between vowels. We don’t have the Y sound for the double.

    And since when have you been doing gags?.

    “Ed Miliband is making a well researched move to re-position Labour electorally as the party of the middle-classes. Could work.”

    Is subtle but good.

  9. I forgot to mention that in the 1960s, roughly two decades after the end of WWII, Jo Grimond’s Liberals made a pitch about how they were the only party with a proper balance of classes because one-third of their members were upper-class, one-third were middle-class and one-third were working class. Which was actually true (I tried and failed to refute it) – the Conservatives did not have such a balance since an overall majority of Conservatives were working class. The middle class comprised less than one-quarter of the population.
    The growth in the size of the middle class is post-64 due to firstly, the output of all the new universities created by the MacMillan government (some of which were opened during his tenure and some after he quit), and secondly to the abolition of many working-class jobs by the introduction of automation following Wilson’s Redundancy Payments Act which deterred employers from hiring extra workers during a cyclical, hence temporary, upsurge in demand.

  10. @BIS
    “Likelihood” “similitude”? What convention of doubling L’s between vowels?The rule with double L’s, which I once used to teach (from a formidably old fashioned book), is (was?) :words ending double L drop one L when going into a compound so “till” becomes “until”
    And I have always done gags ,thank you very much.There is nothing else for it when explaining that there are age old theories / solutions to most of the problems that the modern chattering classes (mostly underemployed computer nerds) find stunningly difficult when armed with an overconfident belief that laissez faire and free play of numbers in algebraic formulations will solve everything.When they do n’t.

  11. @DBC
    million
    mullion
    Millicent
    malleable
    & on & on
    The redundant,English second L. Unlike Lille. where we pronounce both of them.

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