Eh?

They of course will claim that they do nothing wrong in doing so. In BVI law I am sure that is true. I would not be so comfortable with that claim with regard to Chinese law, but the case is not proven; we do not know what these Chinese owned companies do.

But what we can say is that all the usual culprits who make the offshore world work are present. Several years ago Prof Prem Sikka called them The Pinstripe Mafia. He was right to do so. They threaten democracy and society around the world and they do so knowingly.

There’s democracy in China to threaten?

18 comments on “Eh?

  1. It isn’t a parliamentary multi-party system with state owned media being legally required to be balanced. Nonetheless the majority of people approve of the government.

    We have a parliamentary multi-party system in which all the approved parties agree on 90% of things but do a pantomime over the maybe 5% they don’t and in which the state owned broadcaster, while having that legal requirement, make no attempt to keep it. And we have the large majority of people hating the entire ruling cartel.

    My guess is that if the British people were allowed to chose the current Chinese government, with 10% annual growth or the LabConDems & recession we would go overwhelmingly for the former.

    So which has democratic legitimacy?

  2. @Neil Craig

    But comparing policy outcomes in China and the UK is absurd. There’s no way the UK could replicate a 10% annual growth rate – it’s too near the PPF. China’s growth rate is, inevitably, falling too. On the other hand there is no way that the typical Brit would be willing to sign up to Chinese levels of poverty, an unaffordably-expensive-at-the-point-of-delivery healthcare system, or for the right to a be imprisoned for their and society’s own good if they mouth off about the wrong thing on Twitter or FB. Brits like a good moan about the government, or about politics in general, and to take that as a sign that Brits would therefore prefer a government that prosecutes anyone who moans is stretching it.

  3. Neil Craig,

    Even as someone who disagrees with the FPTP system and that it creates a 2 party system, the fact is that still gives choice, and if those 2 parties fail to be roughly in tune with the people, a new party will appear (UKIP’s rise is down to the Conservatives moving too far to the centre).

    And everyone’s disgruntlement and not voting is more a sign of people having a First World Problems view of the situation than general disagreement. “Oh, all these politicians are useless and the country is going to the dogs” these people say, while they have plenty of food to eat, cars, iPhones and foreign holidays.

  4. MBE
    ‘or for the right to a be imprisoned for their and society’s own good if they mouth off about the wrong thing on Twitter or FB.’
    Modern Britain in a nutshell.

  5. We have cars, fast food, iphones etc despite the political/bureaucratic pork not because of them. Choose NuLabour or choose BluLabour (and the limp dicks)–shit vs shite. China is still–in terms of freedom–a bigger shithole than the UK but each year there is less in it.

    NB–we certainly could have 10% growth per year for long stretches of time, if not each and every year, were we free of the thieving, meddling scum of the state.

    s

  6. @ Neil ‘Nonetheless the majority of people approve of the government.’

    How do you know this is true?

    ‘My guess is that if the British people were allowed to chose the current Chinese government, with 10% annual growth or the LabConDems & recession we would go overwhelmingly for the former.’

    Fuck me sideways, what an astonishingly stupid point to make.

  7. “But comparing policy outcomes in China and the UK is absurd. There’s no way the UK could …(whatever)”

    “Fuck me sideways, what an astonishingly stupid point to make.”

    Trouble is, reality overwhelmingly refutes both points. Governments are indeed elected promising the utterly impossible to be achieved by via astonishingly stupid means.

    Must try harder.

  8. If it were as simple as you claim (or the British electorate were as gullible), someone would be promising 10% growth and would be elected shortly thereafter.

    Since that is not happening, and clearly wouldn’t, ‘reality overwhelmingly refutes’ only you.

    Must try harder.

  9. @ Neil Craig
    I assume that you are trying unsuccessfully to be funny
    The Chinese Communist party has never won a free election and came to power through force of arms after – and only after – they were supported in their murderous violence against the elected government by the neighbouring Great Power.
    It does not, and never has had, any democratic legitimacy whatsoever.
    The current UK government (unlike its immediate predecessor) won a majority of votes cast in a free election.
    That, by definition, confers upon it democratic legitimacy.

  10. Pointing to China to demonstrate the advantages of a benevolent dictatorship only works if there is benevolence.

    I’m sure if the British people were to choose a Chinese system of government they’d probably have at least the sense to realise it would be the last vote they’d ever cast.

    Votes are important, if you don’t vote for the Lizards, the wrong Lizard might get in.

  11. The Chinese government acts like a democracy even though it isn’t one, as they appreciate that unless they can keep everyone’s standard of living rising then there is always the risk of revolution.

    However when it comes to determining which country is more “free” then I think that in the business community at least, China is significantly more free than it is the the Western world. The level of regulation is far lower than that which exists in the West, hence business can do things far quicker than they can over here. Of course you might need to grease a few palms to get things done, but generally from a business competitiveness point of view China has an advantage.

    On the BVI point, yep there are loads of Chinese people using BVI companies, and I suspect that there is a fair bit of round tripping going on, but hey it is likely to be legal under Chinese Law. The attractions of a BVI company are easy to explain to a wealthy Chinese person, cheap, quick, high levels of control, recognised internationally etc etc.

    Also one interesting aspect of Chinese culture is the entire status thing. You have made it in China when you have your Louis Vitton Luggage and a BVI hold co. Its a status thing

  12. @ Jarrod
    Freedom to ignore patents and trademarks and safety regulations and rules about pollution and farmers’ land ownership rights and petty foreign rules about telling the truth in share listing documents and …
    But not freedom to disagree with the Party’s diktats any more than democrats or Falung Gong or natives of illegally occupied Tibet or of probably illegally occupied Sinkiang (there seems to be some doubt) or poor people who want a second child (while party grandees can have five).

  13. John77, I don’t disagree, but if you wanted to start a business fast and cheap you can do it in China. Not saying that this is a good thing, just saying that when it comes to regulation and compliance costs, it is much lower there than here

  14. And, after your business is successful, you piss off someone in power, get accused of corruption, and are shot in the back of the head after a cursory show trial.

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