Well, yes

Farage may be a public school-educated banker, but he does a much better impression of an ordinary person than the leaders of the other parties.”

The others seem to have difficulty in making the impression that they’re human, let alone ordinary.

33 comments on “Well, yes

  1. Tim, What are you doing? You know this guy is a charlatan who will never hold high office or refashion the other parties in his own image. Whatever the shortcomings of the political class to which he plays grinning iconoclast, they at least have acquired, and can deploy, real power. He’s going round in circles.

  2. Well UKIPs success might encourage the main political parties to stop shitting on the British people. At the very least it raises the cost of shitty behavior.

  3. The Telegraph article is simply another example of the self-referential “Westminster Village” talking about itself. The “shocks” and “scandals” that set the chatterati alight are simply seen as inconsequential by, probably, the vast majority of those of us who are excluded from the dizzy heights.

    It wouldn’t hurt a few of the “elite” and their paid monkeys to visit a few ordinary pubs up and down the country and listen to the views expressed.

  4. “You know this guy is a charlatan who will never hold high office or refashion the other parties in his own image.”

    So what are you saying? Its only worth voting for a charlatan if they have a chance of real power? I think we’ve tried that one to death in recent times, perhaps a change is called for?

    A vote for UKIP isn’t a vote for Farage, or even his policies. Its a ‘We hate all the main parties so much we’ll vote for just about anyone who isn’t a slack jawed racist’ vote. I think most people have got to the point with the three main parties that anything would be preferable to an endless future of Cameron/Clegg/Milliband clones.

  5. Ed Miliband does a cracking impression of a Roomba that became sentient after being struck by lightning while hoovering up discarded clippings from the Readers Wives section of the Socialist Worker.

    David Cameron is spookily good at playing a fat, grown up version of Lord Snooty from The Beano, crossed with a fat version of Raffles, the gentleman thug from Viz, crossed with Ted Heath after a Toblerone binge.

    Nick Clegg is like an effete X Factor finalist who’s always on the verge of bursting into tears when his sad backstory is regaled before singing a shit, melisma-riddled cover version of Cindi Lauper’s True Colours and making cow eyes at the voting public while his lips tremble “please like me!”. Cleggy is living testament to the sad decline of bullying in England’s public schools and probably still has to hand over his lunch money to George Osborne.

  6. Pogo,
    “It wouldn’t hurt a few of the “elite” and their paid monkeys to visit a few ordinary pubs up and down the country and listen to the views expressed.”

    Yes it would hurt. Most people rarely go to the pub. So they’d get an unrepresentative view of what people think. And in any case, do you want politicos to be even more focus group driven?

  7. David Cameron is spookily good at playing a fat, grown up version of Lord Snooty from The Beano…

    He does, but he is bizarrely electable. Fuck knows how, but when he burst onto the scene he was compared favourably against Blair, the people thought he was electable, and then went off to vote for him. At the time I wondered who the hell would prefer Cameron over David Davies, who at least looks and acts like an adult, and quickly realised that any candidate I have even a passing liking for has a snowball’s chance in hell of being elected. So I emigrated, on the grounds that if I’m going to be governed by some idiot who everyone else thinks is okay, I might as well be somewhere where the weather is good.

    Looking at it, this is what justifies my looking to set up in France long term: Hollande is a twat, but so is Miliband, and the cheese is better here.

  8. Tim Newman – I don’t agree that Cameron is especially electable. He failed to secure a majority in the teeth of Gordon Brown’s wildly unpopular government and has spent the four years since doing everything imaginable to alienate his party’s supporters.

    I’m baffled as to who David Cameron thinks he appeals to. There simply isn’t a large constituency of voters out there who love gay marriage, the EU, foreign aid and windfarms, and who will also unaccountably vote Tory rather than Labour or Lib Dem.

    Lynton Crosby seems to have gotten the message across to Dave that he needs to do something to retain Conservative voters. But being the PR man Cameron is, this has translated into naff stunts like the “Go Home” vans and Dave’s sudden profession of Christianity rather than anything substantive. I don’t think it’s working.

    I do agree with you that the grown ups no longer seem to be in charge though.

  9. Yes it would hurt. Most people rarely go to the pub.

    ‘Most people’ rarely do anything homogenous. But the pub (always allowing for including lots of different types of pub) is the closest thing you’ll get to a forum that contains a broad cross-section – when taken in conglomerate – of people.

  10. Tim N: “Looking at it, this is what justifies my looking to set up in France long term: Hollande is a twat, but so is Miliband, and the cheese is better here”

    A popular belief but untrue, about the cheese, that is.

  11. ‘He failed to secure a majority in the teeth of Gordon Brown’s wildly unpopular government ‘
    Constituency boundaries significantly favouring Labour and postal ballot fraud. Blair really was a crook.

  12. I don’t agree that Cameron is especially electable. He failed to secure a majority in the teeth of Gordon Brown’s wildly unpopular government and has spent the four years since doing everything imaginable to alienate his party’s supporters.

    Agreed, but he was vastly more popular than all of his predecessors. God alone knows why.

    A popular belief but untrue, about the cheese, that is.

    True, but it’s a lot easier to get hold of in France: in the UK, you need to hunt about a little bit.

  13. A popular belief but untrue, about the cheese, that is.

    “Good local cheese is more readily available”, then. In much of France as opposed to much of the UK.

    I quite like a lot of British cheese but the only stuff local and easily available to me are various varieties of radioactively coloured “cheddar”. There may be some artisan stuff at the farmers’ markets but they’re only two a month not ‘nearly every day’.

  14. Eddy – Yes, I know. But even so, Cameron’s results in 2010 were terrible compared with John Major’s result in 1992, never mind the Thatcher victories. Dave only managed to persuade 36% of the electorate to back his party, and that was against a mentally ill man whose government had just blown up the economy.

    If Dave was a smart politician, he’d have gotten the boundaries fixed as a top priority on getting into office. Instead, he tamely surrendered to the Lib Dems and squandered political capital on things that only hurt his chances of re-election. He seems content to be a one-term PM.

  15. Tim N & SE,

    OK, I was being ever so slightly facetious about the cheese.

    But not that much.

    Dunno where you both reside but here in Cumbria, local hand-made cheeses are readily available seven days a week not only in Farm Shops but in our regional supermarket chain, Booths.

  16. I have lived in France and do live in Italy (the clue is in the name) but I have no doubt that the best cheese in the world in English.

    What is missing is a widespread appreciation of genuinely fine food as opposed to the ubiquitous curry, thai food and so on.

  17. Glad we’re chatting about cheese.

    If Nigel Farage were a cheese, he’d be a Red Leicester.

    Artificially coloured (in perpetual outrage) with carrot juice, suggesting a strong, salty flavour, hard and dry but with more flavour in the muslin wrapper than the cheese itself.

    Best toasted.

    Not a patch on a Kendal Crumbly or Garstang Blue.

  18. Tim Newman,

    Agreed, but he was vastly more popular than all of his predecessors. God alone knows why.

    Timing, mostly.

    Hague had to go up against Blair with a buoyant economy, lots of promising things happening, no foreign interventions. Even if he’d been a more popular person, he wouldn’t have won.

    He wasn’t wildly better than Michael Howard. He got 36.1% of the vote compared to 32.4% in 2005. Howard got a lot less seats, but left a lot of close Labour marginals after that election that were easy to push over.

  19. Dunno where you both reside but here in Cumbria, local hand-made cheeses are readily available seven days a week not only in Farm Shops but in our regional supermarket chain, Booths.

    I’m in a suburb of Paris, and the selection of cheese in the local Carrefour City – the equivalent of a Tesco Metro – is impressive. I understand the French seem to happily ignore all rules on using only pasteurised milk, too. Not sure what the score is in the UK, but the Australians and Americans have kittens over unpasteurised cheese.

  20. @ GeoffH
    When I was young, I used to buy real Red Leicester which was a deep red, not the orangy-red supermarket stuff coloured by beta-carotene and tasted better.
    If any blogger knows where I can buy the decent stuff down south I’d be grateful.

  21. @ Steve
    That is not quite fair: the Lib Dems welched on the boundary changes deal over an issue that was *not* linked to it once their psephologists had calculated that they would be big losers, as a side-effect, from the proposed changes. Cameron cannot get *anything* through without LibDem support thanks to the massive over-representation of Labour in both houses.

  22. John77 – Lib Dems welching, who would have predicted it? Apart from everyone who has dealt with Lib Dems.

    Cameron had a couple of options I can think of offhand:

    1) Append the boundary legislation to the same bill setting up the AV referendum.

    2) Make it clear to the Lib Dems that failure to hold up their end of the deal would lead to them being kicked out of the government. Goodbye, ministerial chauffeurs, flunkies, and red boxes. It would leave the Tories a minority government but so what? How’s that worse than pretending to form a viable coalition where you can’t even get the boundaries un-Gerrymandered?

    Option 1 would have required a little foresight. Option 2 only requires some testicular fortitude.

    Cameron has shown he has neither.

  23. Contrary to the apparent general view of Farage as the type of bloke one might want to go to the pub with, I wouldn’t go anywhere near any pub he was in, and I’d leave my favourite pub (The Woolpack at Slad, as it happens) if he walked into it. He’s got such a fucking loud, irritating voice, for one thing.

    But politicians are almost literally all weirdos, so what’s new. I can’t think of any group of people so homogenously unpalatable as politicians, from parish councillor up.

    That said, we do seem to have to vote for one of them. My reason for voting for Farage (if I do) is that he is at least claiming to want to remove one lot of politcal and bureaucratic interference from my life.

  24. Slad you say? You know Laurie Lee’s daughter then? Used to drink in a pub she worked at in Cheltenham back in the day…..

  25. Farage may be a public-school educated banker, but I like to think he’s one of the Brylcreem Boys and light-years from the world of Cameron, Clegg and Miliband.

  26. Slad you say? You know Laurie Lee’s daughter then? Used to drink in a pub she worked at in Cheltenham back in the day…..

    Rosie, presumably? And you drank cider at the time?

  27. Gawd ‘elp us Tim Newman, you don’t know your authors.

    The daughter’s name was Jessy and she thought her dad was a manipulative old soak.

    That’s family for you.

  28. @Luke April 28, 2014 at 11:18 am

    Yes it would hurt. Most people rarely go to the pub.

    In your experience maybe… I live in a village that’s posessed of three pubs and I’d estimate that 70+% of the adult population can be found in one of them at some time or another.

    Re “focus groups” – I doubt that many of such make references to “scheming, lying, duplicitous, out-of-touch c*nts” too frequently. 🙂

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