9 comments on “Interesting

  1. Rather racist assumption from the Guardian.

    People with mixed race families can’t be patriotic?

  2. Tony Parsons? I take it you’re still looking for that all-important non swivel-eyed loon voter then?

  3. Why do people diss swivel eyed loons so much? The swivel eyed loons were right about the Maastricht Treaty, right about the Euro, and right about Lenny Henry not being funny.

    Some of the greatest and most iconic Britons were swivel eyed loons: Lord Nelson, Winston Churchill, and many of the Victorian-looking gentlemen in the animated bits of Monty Python’s Flying Circus.

    We swivel eyed lunatics are slow to anger, but you mock us at your peril. Our eyes are constantly sweeping the horizon, so we will find you eventually. Baaaah!

  4. Aren’t these stock predictable insults tedious. Swivel-eyed loons, knuggle-dragging neanderthals, tin-hate brigade, green ink brigade, idiot, wingnut, tosser, prick, knob. What else is there?

  5. @Steve,

    We’ve been waiting for the swivel-eyed loons to be right about the euro for 15 years now.

    Any day now, I’m sure.

    @Trofim, yes they are indeed tedious but it’s election season, so everyone is fair game to everyone else at the moment. VOTE FDP!!!

  6. Why would someone with a Japanese wife automatically be assumed to want EU membership? Do The Guardian really mean to imply that all them foreigners are the same?

  7. The euro, that shining and successful experiment where 50% unemployment rate or governement debt default are just annoying side effects.

    Only kept alive through the ECB bending the rules, and german subsidies.

    A runaway success.

  8. That 50% unemployment (highly selective use of statistics there) and that default (albeit masked by money printing) were features of the countries concerned long before the euro.

  9. > That 50% unemployment (highly selective use of statistics there) and that default (albeit masked by money printing) were features of the countries concerned long before the euro.

    No, some of the underlying causes were already features of the countries concerned. Pressure on a poor economy would usually be released via the exchange rate getting worse. The Euro removed that mechanism, hence the threat of default instead. You know, like a bunch of swivel-eyed loons said would happen.

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