16 comments on “Great culinary breakthroughs of our time

  1. SCIENCE! hard at work I see.

    Quite a lot of things are more palatable with a Cup of Soup. I think some sort of hierarchy must exist – clearly Cup of Soup lies above ramen noodles. Wonder what lies below – is anything made more palatable by addition of ramen noodles?

  2. “What are Ramen noodles?”

    I would guess some kind of instant/2 minute noodle. I think Tim’s just re-invented Pot Noodle.

  3. Google to the rescue

    Ramen is a Japanese noodle soup dish. It consists of Chinese-style wheat noodles served in a meat- or (occasionally) fish-based broth

    Somehow I think that when Tim is away from the missus his diet suffers

  4. bilbaoboy – “Somehow I think that when Tim is away from the missus his diet suffers”

    Well let’s hope he never has to add the heart of a love rival to the pot.

    Actual ramen, made in Japan, is genuinely nice. You used to be able to buy some from these guys in wellington boots in the train station. Proper ramen, from a real restaurant is even better. Instant noodles less so.

  5. ” is anything made more palatable by addition of ramen noodles?”
    Vegemite?
    …….
    Nah.

  6. I think Tim has this one the wrong way around, because the ramen soup-mix is almost entirely MSG and salt. What he’s actually discovered is that to make modern cup-a-soup palatable you have to add back the salt and MSG they’ve taken out over the last few years.

  7. Instant Ramen noodles are very commonly used when money is scarce because they’re cheap (~4 packets/$). I always ate them dry, right out of the envelope. (It’s an acquired taste.)

  8. I always eat noodles with a tin of Campbell’s (or Bachelor’s) condensed chicken or mushroom soup. With no, or little, extra water.
    There was a time when I lived off these.

  9. There are whole websites devoted to “hacking” (that is, adding various things to make them more suitable for human nutrition) instant noodles.

    Some of them are quite good, some are quite funny, some are both.

  10. First, throw away the horrid flavour pack. Get a bunch of spring onions, a carrot and a stick of celery, Dice the celery and carrot finely (4mm dice) and cut the spring onions into 3mm thick disks. Bring half a can of reduced-sodium chicken stock to the boil with half a can of water, then add all the veggies with a couple of good grinds of black pepper and reduce to simmer. Cook until the onions and carrot are tender, then add the noodles. They need about four minutes to cook. Right at the end, add a good splash of soy sauce, some Tabasco and some shredded coriander. Less than a quid’s worth of ingredients, pretty tasty, and ten minutes’ work.

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