Nando’s tax dodging ways

“Richard Enthoven is the ultimate beneficial owner of Nando’s,” the company’s spokesman told us. “He is not resident in the US or the UK.” This means that he is not liable to pay any British personal tax.

Non-Englishman does not pay English tax shocker!

Jeez, they really are scraping the barrel here, aren’t they?

The company added: “Nando’s is a concept founded in South Africa. Nando’s in the UK is one of 22 national franchises operating globally. All the franchises operate under standard market licensing arrangements and this includes the brand licensing fee. This franchising arrangement enables the UK company to access expertise, intellectual property and capital from the company’s global operations and has helped fund its growth.”

Be interesting to see what fee The Guardian is charging Guardian US and Guardian Oz for the brand, wouldn’t it?

7 comments on “Nando’s tax dodging ways

  1. Jeez, that was a really, really poor article! Even by the Guardian’s innumerate standards, a really poor article.

  2. Ironman

    “Jeez, that was a really, really poor article! Even by the Guardian’s innumerate standards, a really poor article.”

    I have to disagree here. By the Guardian’s standards re tax avoidance, this was an excellent article. R Murphy was not quoted or even mentioned once.

  3. This franchising arrangement enables the UK company to access expertise, intellectual property and capital from the company’s global operations and has helped fund its growth.

    What an abomination!! The bastards!!

  4. The guardian comments are interesting. Usual call for a sales tax payable by companies (one way to encourage companies to increase prices) and a reference to amazon’s 13.4 billion euro profit last year – amazing for a company with only about 75 billion turnover! Some people not seeing the difference between sales and profit – never want to employ them in my business! Is it discrimination to not employ really stupid?

  5. and a reference to amazon’s 13.4 billion euro profit last year – amazing for a company with only about 75 billion turnover!

    Whereas the actual, most recent figures are:

    Internet retailer Amazon reported a 32% jump in profits to $108m (£64m) in the first quarter of 2014.

    The firm said strong sales – which increased by 23% to $19.74bn – helped contribute to the profit growth.

    This isn’t anything to do with not seeing the difference between sales and profit, this is just making numbers up.

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