Ritchie’s career advice

As I said to a young graduate who sought careers advice from me this summer on how she might get into economic justice campaigning, become a chartered accountant first. PhDs and other qualifications might be all very useful, but grounded experience and having some real world exposure to what you want to talk about doesn’t half help.

Hasn’t he missed a bit there? If you want to campaign about economic justice might it not be worth staying awake in your economics lectures? So that, you know, you know something about economics?

20 comments on “Ritchie’s career advice

  1. “Hasn’t he missed a bit there? If you want to campaign about economic justice might it not be worth staying awake in your economics lectures?”

    Well no, because there is precedent for (even) an irascible, hypocritical, arrogant fat toad to bunk off economics lectures at Uni, study chartered accountancy and later become “the number 1 economics blogger in the UK”, despite knowing SFA about economics.

    Must be scope for a female to top that, especially if she is nice looking and occasionally flashes her norks on her blog (economic competence would be a bonus, not a requirement here)

  2. Entirely wrong, Worstall: somebody who wants a career in ”economic justice campaigning” must be especially careful to learn no economics.

  3. What does economics have to do with economic justice?

    Little Missy would do better going to the nearest street corner and watching the panhandlers ply their trade.

  4. GeoffH – What on earth is ” economic justice campaigning”?

    Telling higher-rate taxpayers and entrepreneurs that they’re exploitative bastards who aren’t doing enough to support benefits claimants and public sector employees.

    Agitating for expropriation of people’s property, be it land, savings, pensions, etc.

    Campaigning for the state to seize all inheritances.

    Advocating the elimination of independent schools and private healthcare, because it’s unfair that people should be able to buy a good education for their children, or competent medical treatment for themselves.

    Writing policy documents urging the government to force a four day maximum working week on us all, so we have more free time to spend planting turnips in our allotments.

  5. I’m not Tim is right about the usefulness of studying Economics in this regard.

    Probably better to study a science subject?

  6. Follow my advice and you too could spend all your days sitting in your garden shed reinforcing every mad idea you get.

  7. But tim, if the fresh young graduate studied economics, her head would be clouded by received prejudice 😉

  8. Hello – Chartered Management Accountant here. Accountancy is nothing, repeat nothing, to do with economics. Yes, we know about taxation and its potential effects on business, but we don’t know about the implications for the wider population or whether tax is a better tool than other social policies. Hell, we don’t even do that much tax anymore.

    Economics is just not part of our syllabus. Double-entry, management information systems, costing techniques, analysis of product revenue streams, fancy mucking about with balance sheets, consolidations (UK and international), cashflow… all good. Economic theory and justice… not so much.

    I’ve got 25 years in the game so I know.

    Having said that, Richie is right to say that having some real experience is a good grounding before waving the placards.

  9. I didn’t know that Murphy had a tax-based dog called Hector – interesting when you think of it as a verb.

  10. “Mr. Murphy, how can I become a leech?”

    Actually, this story has the ring of falsehood. I just don’t buy the idea that wide-eyed acolytes buttonhole Murphy to find out how to write panhandling guff for the TUC. He gives off too much of a trainspottery vibe for that to be plausible.

  11. @Interested: Hector was the name of the tax inspector character in the (as it was then) Inland Revenue adverts. Which, yes, given the verb, I can only assume someone at the agency was having a laugh.

  12. Hmm career advice…ĺet’s see:

    Have lots of principles. Wear them on tour sleeves. Castigate anyone type suspect of not sharing them. And then, when an operator of privatised rail services offers you dosh, take it and run!

  13. Having said that, Richie is right to say that having some real experience is a good grounding before waving the placards.

    Except the real world experience would probably make you realise the stupidity of the messages on the placards.

    I just don’t buy the idea that wide-eyed acolytes buttonhole Murphy to find out how to write panhandling guff for the TUC.

    Exactly, it’s not like the barriers to entry on social justice campaigning are high.

  14. Well, Ritchie’s accountancy training hasn’t helped him understand banking.

    Did anyone else see his new demand that the bank clearing system is taken into public hands and nationalised? Apparently it was failure of the clearing system which caused the financial crisis. He seems to misunderstand the difference between banks having cash and the system for transferring that cash between banks.

    Tony Robertson is still valiantly trying to point out the error. Unless Ritchie is correct after all?

  15. “Tony Robertson is still valiantly trying to point out the error. Unless Ritchie is correct after all?”

    It’s utterly pointless to argue with Murphy, and I have discovered it is equally pointless to argue with anyone arguing for a Yes vote in the referendum, right up the First and Deputy First Ministers.

    A waste of time.

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