Lucky, lucky, Zimbabwe, eh?

Robert Mugabe’s much younger wife has stepped into the battle to succeed the Zimbabwean president in an address to a ruling party rally in which she proclaimed she was the “chief advisor” to the nonagenarian leader.

Just gets better and better for the country, doesn’t it?

Describing herself as “chief advisor to the president”, Mrs Mugabe hinted she sees herself in a position to take over presidency. “I have so much ambition,” she warned.

10 comments on “Lucky, lucky, Zimbabwe, eh?

  1. Ordinary people don’t need choice – they are sick of it. I know this because a leading expert told me.

    Her appointment will lead to a stable transition of power. She will be The People’s Choice.

  2. Wives of powerful men rarely succeed them in repressive dictatorships. After all, Mugabe knows the real world. He knows what levers to pull, what buttons to press – what leaders to buy off and cajole. He has history with them since they were in the Bush together.

    Ms Mugabe has none of that. Her experience is ordering servants about. She cannot know much about the world of Zimbabwean men. Where giving orders does not always result in orders being obeyed.

    If she is lucky she will be allowed to go in to exile.

  3. Rob

    Yes indeed. That same expert also tells us that people don’t want to make complicated choices on how society us run; they want to leave it experts.

    Zimbabwe has been so very lucky to have been a Courageous State for the past 33 years. We should be so lucky here in the UK.

  4. john malpas – “In so many places they would be better off if they brought back the British.”

    They would be better off if they brought back the British as they were then. As we would be.

    But actually in many parts of the world they would not be that much better off if they brought back the British as they are now. Zimbabwe is an obvious exception. So is South Yemen. Iraq.

    Can you imagine what the Guardian-reading civil servants would do somewhere like Malaysia?

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