Yes these people are entirely fucking stupid

Californians facing the prospect of endless drought, mandated cuts in water use and the browning of their summer lawns are mounting a revolt against the bottled water industry, following revelations that Nestlé and other big companies are taking advantage of poor government oversight to deplete mountain streams and watersheds at vast profit.

An online petition urging an immediate end to Nestle’s water bottling operations in the state has gathered more than 150,000 signatures, in the wake of an investigation by the San Bernardino Desert Sun that showed the company is taking water from some of California’s driest areas on permits that expired as long as 27 years ago.

OK. So, how much are they taking?

One key question will be how much water Nestlé is taking to create what one industry group delightfully calls “the quintessential hydrating beverage”. The company claims 700m gallons a year, or about what it takes to keep two golf courses green.

Hmm. In 2010 California water usage was 38 billion gallons a day.

2% of one day’s usage. 30 minutes usage in fact.

Err, that’s in one year Nestle takes what the rest of California uses in 30 minutes. 0.005% of total usage.

Yes, I think we can safely conclude that these protestors are entirely fucking stupid.

33 comments on “Yes these people are entirely fucking stupid

  1. I do find this story amusing.
    At the house I use in Spain’s Sierra Nevadas there’s a swimming pool. And in this pool, at bar prices, is about a million Euros of one of Spain’s premier mineral waters.
    Because it’s what comes down the irrigation channels. From the same watershed gets bottled as Lanjaron water.
    It’s also used on the land. By the hundreds of litres a day.
    Occasionally we even drink it.

  2. Some are probably stupid. Others are simply pushing a big Trojan horse filled to bursting with social justice warriors desperate to bring about some sort of socialist-communist nirvana.

    I think they may succeed, too. I am offering evens on millions of people either leaving Cali for Texas fro m abojut 2025 onwards, or dying of thirst/riot related injury.

    It’s all a long way from the Beach Boys.

  3. I am offering evens on millions of people either leaving Cali for Texas fro m abojut 2025 onwards, or dying of thirst/riot related injury.

    Unfortunately, these idiots tend to leave their failed cities for functioning ones and then turn them into failed ones.

  4. Tim Newman,

    Just a correction in your post. These fools move from failed cities, counties, regions, provinces, states, and countries to go and fuck-up the functioning ones.

    A bit like the plague.

  5. What you have done there is maths (oops, sorry “math”!).

    Californians regard this as an un-American activity.

  6. The fact that it is 2% of one day’s usage is IMHO irrelevant. What is more relevant is the fact that the water is bottled for consumption, presumably mostly by Californians who would otherwise drink tap water. I think it is probably a fair bet that a lower percentage of the bottled water goes to waste than the amount of water that leaks from the potable water supply.

  7. @ john miller
    Not quite.
    One of my first-year textbooks was written for Californian post-graduates.

  8. Bottled water, like margarine, is one of those things that appeals to my inner-authoritarian. I would like to ban both.

    Having drinking water on tap is a tremendous achievement and a great luxury, but one generally taken for granted.

    You can even put the stuff in a bottle and take it with you if you wish.

  9. “The company claims 700m gallons a year, or about what it takes to keep two golf courses green.”
    And California has around 1,000 golf courses. So wouldn’t it be 500 times more effective to ban golf?

  10. Typical of such campaigners, they use the large numbers such as 700m gallons knowing that the vast majority of people will have no clue as what it means in context of overall use. Exactly the same methods used by the anti fracking campaigners about the water used in drilling.

  11. I occasionally drink that San Pelligrino mineral water. It does taste like it’s got some minerals in it. And bubbles. At least I feel like I’m paying for some bubbles.

    It’s my “I started out working class but look at me now drinking mineral water in my back garden” thing. Cheaper than a top of the range Merc.

  12. California’s drought is mostly man-made. Vast amounts of water-intensive crops (e.g. Almonds) are grown there because water is massively subsidised for agriculture (plus weird water laws). If water had a market price which reflected its scarcity as a resource sanity might prevail.

    It won’t though because too many vested interests want things to stay as they are.

  13. “Having drinking water on tap is a tremendous achievement and a great luxury, but one generally taken for granted. ”

    The mystery of the Spanish house is the local water company takes exactly the same precious mineral water, chlorinates the hell out of it & sell it back to us fit for industrial bleaching or to appear on a list of chemical weapons. Drinking it would be no luxury & certainly wouldn’t be taken for granted.

  14. Possibly 14 golf courses – Several web pages quote Californian golf courses as using between 50 and 100 million gallons per year each. Point still valid though.

  15. They don’t care about the water. They care about the vast profit. Should Nestle break even on the water, the Libtards wouldn’t be complaining.

  16. But..on water use.
    There always seems to be a presumption, once water’s used – it’s used. if you look at that map of California golf courses & look at prevailing winds, the water evapourated off the watered courses blows back towards the mountain ranges where California water is sourced & likely falls there as rain.
    Mostly, it just goes round.

  17. @gamecock,

    In the left’s lexicon profit is always preceded by vast to matter what scale of profit is being made.

    Apropos the post below this we know the reason for the problem, the market clearing price is too low and therefore know the solution. As Rob says, too many vested interests.

  18. Gamecock: They only care about a vast profit but wouldn’t mind breaking even.?

    Find someone to set that to music and you could be the new Gilbert and Sullivan.

  19. Bottled water, like margarine, is one of those things that appeals to my inner-authoritarian. I would like to ban both.

    I tend to agree with Bloke (not) in Spain. I’ve got well water, and it’s full of iron. You should see the toilet cistern and other stuff that doesn’t get cleaned regularly. It’s a lovely shade of orange.

    There’s a reason we buy gallon bottles of water for drinking and using in the coffee maker. (I will add that as a cheapskate, I find the individual-sized bottles of water a waste of money.)

  20. Regarding ‘vast’ profits – energy companies apparently earn ‘vast’ profits (about 4% gross profit). No-one mentions the Government’s even vaster profit of, er, 5% (VAT – and 20% for non-domestic use, I believe).

    At least the energy companies deliver the fucking stuff to your home.

  21. This is one of my hobby-horses: the way orders of magnitude get ignored (either through stupidity or malice) in these headline-grabbing stories. It’s unlikely the originators are ignorant, so they go in the malicious camp rather than the stupid one. The journos who promulgate the stories probably have one foot in each, and the suckers who fall for it are just plain thick.

    Do a Google Earth flyover of LA or San Francisco and count the backyard swimming pools. When you hit 35,000 or so, stop. That’s yer 700m gallons right there. And a pool is filled more often than once a year.

  22. Ted S and BNIS:
    I was thinking of tap water in the UK.

    A number of years ago, perhaps 25, Egon Ronay carried out a blind taste test on water available in the UK, and the winner was tap water from Maidstone in Kent.

    At the time, Maidstone also had dubious distinction of being the most, or one of the most, polluted towns in England though the two things may or may not have been connected.

    If it was proved that Maidstone’s delicious tap water was indeed the product of belching buses and rotting trainers, the affect on bottled water marketing campaigns would be far-reaching and probably hilarious.

  23. If the Californian protesters bought & drank Nestle’s bottled water, they can simply recycle it themselves, via their sewage system.

    Unlike with golf courses, very little would then be lost via transpiration or evaporation.

  24. We’re all supposed to cut our water use by 25% this year. Except for the farmers who use most of the water, and employ most of the illegal immigrants. The farmers have also been digging wells because they’re not allowed to take from the Sacramento river for irrigation. That would disturb the spawning grounds of some minute fish that only lives in SF Bay.

    Yes, people around here are stupid.

  25. Jack C – “If it was proved that Maidstone’s delicious tap water was indeed the product of belching buses and rotting trainers, the affect on bottled water marketing campaigns would be far-reaching and probably hilarious.”

    I wonder. Coca Cola was caught using normal British tap water to put in their bottles. People will drink any old crap and won’t know any different.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2637227/Coca-Cola-launches-new-bottled-water-time-doesnt-come-Sidcup-spring-3m-launch-glac-au-smartwater-decade-failure-Dasani.html

    It came from Sidcup for crying out loud.

    The Left is just using the old Leftist adage not to let a good crisis go to waste. So they are using the drought as an excuse for a bit of environmentally-sensitive class war.

  26. These fools move from failed cities, counties, regions, provinces, states, and countries to go and fuck-up the functioning ones.

    Indeed. Sane Americans should support building a wall around California now, before it’s too late.

  27. Sane Americans should support building a wall around California now, before it’s too late.

    Give it a few years and tectonics will produce much the same outcome.

  28. The protesters might be stupid, but the story’s got legs …

    Let’s see, part of California’s water goes into the water systems where it’s priced low, and part of it goes into bottles with Nestle written on them that are priced high.

    And we have a shortage of the stuff priced low.

    Who’d a thunk it?

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