33 comments on “Some people, eh?

  1. Seems relevant: the thoughts of Chairman Church

    Many people I know (myself included) received the news that the Tories had won a majority (and that Ukip got so many votes) with bewilderment. It wasn’t at all what was expected, especially considering that the political conversation that we’d seen on social media for the past six months, had been overwhelmingly in support of the left-wing parties.

    Twatters more likely to be lefty wankers with too much time on their hands shocker.

    It’s all very well for me to sit in my cosy leftie bubble with my baja-sporting friends, spending our free time attending vegan popup barbecues and meeting in art centres to have a bit of a moan about Ukip; we missed the changing climate of British politics. We dismissed the growing support for the right wing as just a few comedy racists, underestimated the momentum they were gaining, and thought that by retweeting the latest Owen Jones article, we were doing our bit. Wrong.

    So what is the answer, Charlotte? Some timely introspection on your part? Maybe re-examine some of your kneejerk leftwing political stances?

    Nah…

    We need to take the action we should’ve taken before, now. Just because the piratical Conservative party now have a majority doesn’t mean that we’ve lost.

    Two things:

    1) I fucking love the idea of CCHQ as a pirate ship, peg-leg captain Cameron at the helm, and all the salty sea dogs of the Tory party boarding HMS Labour with daggers between their teeth.

    Home Counties ladies in pearls and twinsets ruthlessly cutting down shrieking bearded hipsters with cutlass and flintlock. The deck awash with spilt lattes and blood.

    2) Just because your preferred party lost an election does indeed mean you’ve lost, Charlotte dear. It’s called democracy. Better luck next time.

    On the contrary, it means we’ve got to fight harder. Personally, I feel I haven’t done enough, and I’m going to change that.

    A bigger homemade sign?

    For Andrew RT Davies, the leader of the Welsh Conservatives, to describe my exercising of democratic freedom as “unbecoming” really says more than I ever could. Perhaps he thinks I should get back to the ironing and stop babbling

    Andrew Davies is a gentleman. I, however, am not.

    It wasn’t just “unbecoming” of the demented Welsh slapper to scream at people in the streets. It was also hilarious.

    Perhaps he wants to quiet me because I threaten his status as a wealthy, privately educated, white male.

    The only way Charlotte Church could threaten his status is by giving him genital warts.

    I have earned a lot of money from creating music, but I’ve stayed in Cardiff, where my family are, where the people I grew up with are, where my roots are. I could have sacked them all off and moved to LA.

    Could you fuck. At 29, she’s already washed up. She also looks like she’s pushing 40. Sorry, love. LA doesn’t have a lot of use for bloated, used party girls who’ve gone past their sell-by date. Try Butlins.

  2. If the “it” she wasn’t going to take any more was tax money that wouldn’t be so bad.

    WTF is Baja? (Baja California? Misspelling of Badger?)

  3. With a retired accountant from Norfolk in dubious health and no understanding of any topic of substance at the vanguard of that fifth estate – I have to see the election result seems even more comical in the wake of the reaction to it by Murphy and his pinhead retinue – Ivan Horrocks in particular seems more of a parody than ‘Seamus O’Leary’ or Deirdre Dutt-Pauker…

  4. Steve,

    I actually quite liked her letter. The stuff about “popup vegan barbeques” made me hopeful. But the end was like “so we’ve got to take action, so… we’re having a protest march”.

    The left absolutely love protest marches. I think because it combines a day out with showing off that you care. But in a country with a free press and free elections, they are pretty pointless. Count all the protests in this country and try and work out any that made any difference, from CND marches, legalise cannabis marches, Countryside Alliance, Stop the War, anti-capitalism, anti-cuts, anti-austerity.

    I’d just like these people to make an argument. They talk about austerity, but we haven’t actually cut spending. We’ve cut spending in a few places. We’re closing libraries because they’re the horse and cart of information. We cut a lot of incapacity benefit, because a large percentage of those people just threw in the towel. We’ve raised tuition fees because you should pay for optional education that you think benefits you. I don’t agree with the “bedroom tax”, but it was created to deal with a real problem of people who get a large council house and don’t downsize when the kids leave home. And still, no-one has explained to me why the number of foodbanks is increasing, while unemployment is falling.

  5. dearieme – She’s a sort of Gracie Fields for chavs.

    Mr Ecks – Good old Adele had a (completely justifiable) moan about how much tax she pays. But the left told her to shut up. This is part of the reason why folks like Charlotte Church end up confusing the right-on Twitter echo chamber with reality.

    Gunker – I am at your service, sir.

    The Stigler – Yarp. She started off well. I was thinking “fuck me… self-awareness? In the Guardian?”.

    I don’t think the Left as a whole is truly happy unless the Conservatives are in power.

    That way, they get to stamp their little feet, cry, and take selfies on protest marches. It’s nowhere near as much fun under a Labour government.

    Many lefties love holding up placards, wearing political T-shirts, and throwing shadows at “the Man”. They don’t actually want to be the Man. Just like when a stroppy teenager informs you it’s “not fair” that they have to do as you say – their tantrums don’t mean they’d be happier with the responsibility of paying the mortgage.

    A lot of British lefties just want safe spaces where they can complain about the adults and jazz-hands each other’s righteous poses on transgender pronouns and the plight of vegan feminists in Gaza.

  6. Just had my first serious look at R. Murphy’s website in particular the comments section on one of the articles on the GE results. RM’s theory or more properly an unsupported assertion presented as fact is that the 35%ish who didn’t vote are the supporters who would bring about the sort of policies he likes i.e. tax, tax and more tax. Someone points out that pollsters (and ignore the main error they made on the GE) have done this very analysis and the make up of non-voters is more likely to reflect the overall population in terms of political leanings. Another commentator goes further and says RM’s (unsupported)assertion is nonsense. RM’s reply is that unless they disprove his unsupported assertion he is continuing to treat it as fact and will be proceeding on the basis there is a great untapped pool of voters who will support even more left wing policies than already espoused by Ed Miliband. I despair.

  7. JuliaM,

    “That most working families are only 14 days away from the breadline should they lose their main breadwinner.” Utter cobblers, and nice to see RLC linking to insurance company sales aids to scare people into buying PPI policies, the sort of thing that even I consider as “bad capitalism” (take the money you’d put into a PPI and stick it in a bank account or pay a little off your mortgage).

  8. That 14 days from the breadline issue seems to crop up all the time. Last night I tried watching the new series of Benefits Street – the same story came up, about how one bloke who had been working for eight years suddenly found himself without a penny to his name. Does nobody think to set aside a few pounds for a rainy day?

  9. Craig

    RM’s reply is that unless they disprove his unsupported assertion he is continuing to treat it as fact and will be proceeding on the basis there is a great untapped pool of voters who will support even more left wing policies than already espoused by Ed Miliband. I despair.

    Don’t despair, that’s good!

    On the basis that he has an extreme authoritarian agenda: if he gets his core assumptions wrong, that’s great, as it means he will continue to make wrong turns, poor judgements and generally screw up.

    I will start to worry when he looks like he might be getting his facts right. I would suggest that’s when he may be more likely to become dangerous.

  10. JuliaM – This weekend has, for me, been like the most savage of hangovers. Waves of despair, punctuated by panic, anxiety, paranoia, and fear.

    Stevecam footage

    A profound weltschmerz and a curious lack of appetite, not to mention a high-pitched monotone in my left ear that sadly, this time, cannot be put down to our decrepit fridge.

    The high-pitched monotone kept repeating “these strikes are wrong…”

    a welcome pleasant thought will be interrupted by the terrifying reminder of what they are going to do to the Human Rights Act.

    The horror! The horror! How did we live before the year 2000, when the Human Rights Act came into force?

    As my father said, “It’s all too awful.”

    And he would know.

    I wonder how many of you, up and down the country, have been trying to hold it together too.

    I have been poring over pictures of Ed Miliband, crying and listening to Air Supply.

    I retained my composure for most of Friday, despite no sleep, despite returning home with the birdsong to tell my boyfriend, a public sector worker, the bad news, which he met by rolling over, saying sleepily but with cold certainty, “Well that’s my job gone, then.”

    Are there no food banks?

    I jokingly discussed with friends which sunny, socialist paradise we would decamp to before they shut the borders.

    North Korea or DR Congo.

    I finally broke down properly at around 6pm on Friday, when I allowed myself, finally, to think about my little brother, who is severely disabled, and what might happen to him.

    He’ll probably be eaten by badgers, or forced to work as a human canary in the fracking mines.

    Whether I should grab him and run for the hills so that we could camp down together under warm, soft blankets and not come down again until the bad people have gone.

    She is a strong, independent feminist woman.

    I’m not exactly thrilled that my best childbearing years will take place under a government that considered getting rid of statutory maternity pay

    FFS. She’s nearly 30. Her best childbearing years are already fading fast. Painful, expensive IVF awaits if she puts motherhood off for much longer.

    Just get a box of cats and be done with it, Lucy.

  11. Oi Stevo get a blog.

    Nicely remembered “these strikes are wrong”, I’d forgotten about that – though thought that was unfair, all politicians do similar when getting their line recorded for a short clip on the news – it wasn’t a full interview and Miliband wouldn’t have expected the whole thing to be released.

    Re HRA, much as I find many aspects of it distasteful (the way it requires authorities to “reread” legislation in ever more artificial ways that were clearly never intended just seems bizarre to me – surely more honest just for the judge to declare it incompatible and get parliament to relegislate than have judges radically reinterpret the intentions of legislators) but 2000 feels a lifetime away for the young uns. It’s really had time to bed into the culture and expectations.

  12. Chuch made a shitload of money, which I would have thought put a big target on her back for Lefties, but apparently not. The rich aren’t evil if they talk shit on Twatter.

  13. Last night I tried watching the new series of Benefits Street – the same story came up, about how one bloke who had been working for eight years suddenly found himself without a penny to his name. Does nobody think to set aside a few pounds for a rainy day?

    To be fair, a lot of people who are earning what would ordinarily be classed as decent salaries struggle to save anything. Whatever savings you can accrue tend to be wiped out by unexpected costs (excess for a car insurance claim when somebody puts your window through, for example). This might be £150, which is quite a bit when you can only save £30 per month. I remember doing quite well to save £200 or £250 per month when I had my first job which paid £19,000 per year back in 2000, and I had no kids. Even in Dubai – £28k per year tax free – I struggled to put aside enough each month to raise £20k for a deposit on a flat I never bought. By the time people have been fleeced into paying through the nose for an overpriced shack, they are pretty much wiped out. They might be able to save in a “normal” month, but it only takes one unforeseen event to clear out that stash.

  14. That Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett piece in the Graun was scrumptious. I tried to read it in little increments, like spinning out a really good box of chocolates, but in the end I gave up and scoffed the lot. This bit was a triumph of unintended irony: “There’s something vaguely embarrassing about crying about the government. It buys into a stereotype of left-leaning people as overly emotional and childlike[…]”. This, after half a dozen paragraphs of childish emoting. Here’s another corker: “Despite the Tories’ efficient media facade, it’s obvious that much of their campaigning was predicated on emotion. It relied on fear, jealousy and suspicion of other members of our communities[…]”. Emotion, fear and jealousy? You’ve just been wetting your knickers about how Iain Duncan-Smith is going to turn welfare recipients into pies and how people who have a nice house should pay a swingeing surcharge on top of their council tax. You dozy cow.

    I really didn’t expect the smorgasbord of Lefty grief to be quite so laden with delicacies. The only thing that could top it would be if the Islington contingent of lachrymose Trots pronounced a jihad against WJK and the DPWs. That, to paraphrase Henry Kissinger, is a fight we could hope both sides lose.

  15. “He’ll probably be eaten by badgers, or forced to work as a human canary in the fracking mines.”

    Steve – lovely stuff. Really lost it at this….!

  16. “Does nobody think to set aside a few pounds for a rainy day?”

    They should–but zero % interest (so the scum of the bankrupt state can keep borrowing to keep their Dummy’s Disneyworld above water) is not an extra incentive.

    Steve–You need Arnald to help manage your blog. With the solid record of worldwide success that socialism enjoys his sage advice would be invaluable.

    You: What about advertisers on my blog?
    Big A –Shoot them in the back of the head.

    You: How can I appeal to the 18-30 demographic?
    Big A : Shoot them in the back of the head.

    The possibilities are as endless as a spell in the Gulag.

  17. Serious point: No, Charlotte Church, exercising your democratic freedoms to protest that others exercised theirs in a manner of which you do not approve is simply pampered bourgeois decadence, and indicates absolute contempt for the whole concept of democracy.

    Less serious point: am currently loving the schadenfreude that the lefty grief porn brings. The Tories literally want to cause deaths. They literally want to hurt people. Woe is me, let’s all decamp to Sweden (until we discover there’s a small co-pay for medical treatment which is just INCONCEIVABLE in the NHS)

  18. Tim N,
    It’s fair enough for bad times to hit the odd person from time to time; but for the population as a whole to have just 14 days’ spare cash?

    In fact I’ve uncovered the source report from Legal & General. That 14 day average masks the fact that 35% of households have no savings at all.

    There are immigrants from the third world who work illegally for less than minimum wage yet manage to wire money home every so often. Is it really too much to expect from native Brits?

  19. Steve –

    I fucking love the idea of CCHQ as a pirate ship, peg-leg captain Cameron at the helm, and all the salty sea dogs of the Tory party boarding HMS Labour with daggers between their teeth.

    Home Counties ladies in pearls and twinsets ruthlessly cutting down shrieking bearded hipsters with cutlass and flintlock. The deck awash with spilt lattes and blood.

    Brilliant. Shades of the Crimson Permanent Assurance.

  20. I like the sound of this party that wants to shut down the welfare state, bring back the birch and give communist traitors a smoke and a blindfold. What was its name again?

  21. abacab – “Serious point: No, Charlotte Church, exercising your democratic freedoms to protest that others exercised theirs in a manner of which you do not approve is simply pampered bourgeois decadence, and indicates absolute contempt for the whole concept of democracy.”

    Well Ms Church really seems to be trying to corner the market in bourgeois decadence. This is the girl whose lifeboat for her £800,000 luxury Gin Palace came loose so she called the Coastguard to help find it.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/6917554/Charlotte-Church-calls-lifeboat-and-coastguard-to-rescue-her-inflatable-boat.html

    A friend of the couple, who live in a £1.5m country mansion in the Vale of Glamorgan, said: “Charlotte and Gav love their boat – and he always jokes that Charlotte has a tender behind.

    Well maybe they decided that two children was enough?

  22. @ Andrew M
    “Is it really too much to expect from native Brits?” Yes, if you vote Labour.
    When I was 17 I was working for £6 per *week* as a trainee computer programmer; the amount I saved helped me to live decently when I went up to university. I was better off than average because my father imsisted on topping up my LEA grant to the maximum and I was taken aback when told that an Exhibitioner (who got an extra £40 per year from the college on top of the £300 pa LEA grant) was sending money home to his widowed mother. I wore a tweed jacket* and trousers and had a haircut every other week, he wore a sweatshirt and jeans and had it cut only when necessary. How much it costs to live is one of my/your choices.
    *It cost a ridiculous £8 because the size label was wrong and I was the first guy to try it that it fitted (I had thought that, at that price,it would be worth it if I wore a sweater underneath).

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