17 comments on “Have you ever met middle class Englishmen?

  1. And is ‘alcohol abuse’ used to mean falling down drunk in the gutter, or having more than the recommended* amount?

    *said recommended amount based on nothing more than what a NuPuritan spokesman pulled from his lower colon

  2. Is there a report somewhere highlighting all the dangers to individuals, ranked in order of cost? Something like Bjørn Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus did for the environment, in which he showed that treating malaria was a far better way to spend money than building wind farms. Which is worse, middle-aged alcohol consumption or eating too much salt? Is ligament damage from exercise more dangerous than bone density loss from lack of sport?

    With a full list, correctly ranked, we can know what is and isn’t really important.

  3. Julia,

    We already know what “soaring alcohol abuse” is, because they helpfully started the fight against it a few years ago: it’s women having a glass or two of wine in the evening.

  4. Andrew M
    May 14, 2015 at 9:21 am

    Is there a report somewhere highlighting all the dangers to individuals, ranked in order of cost? Something like Bjørn Lomborg’s Copenhagen Consensus did for the environment, in which he showed that treating malaria was a far better way to spend money than building wind farms. Which is worse, middle-aged alcohol consumption or eating too much salt? Is ligament damage from exercise more dangerous than bone density loss from lack of sport?

    With a full list, correctly ranked, we can know what is and isn’t really important.

    What fun, watching all those control freaks tearing in to each other to get their grant gravy train moved up the league table. Look at what happened to Bjorn, it will be a bloodbath when they don’t have a common enemy. 🙂

  5. Good odds that it is a pack of lies from start to finish. Why even bother wasting time reading it?

  6. @SE

    The problem with that is that it doesn’t let you work out relative risks in a way that lets you “budget” your exposures.

  7. For comparison there is fairly good data on risks of different modes of transport, for instance. I imagine diet and exercise, in their various forms, are rather more complex to model or gather data on.

  8. @ Jack C
    No, an obesity epidemic has replaced fags.
    Smoking is an appetite suppressant when you don’t actually need to eat, so abolishing smoking has boosted consumption of unnecessary food, with an automatic rise on obesity.
    Yes, before anyone else canmmention it, I know that most of the “obesity epidemic” is a media invention because average height has risen by 2″ a generation in my lifetime so average BMI must have risen by 6%, but there really *are* more obese people now than when I was young.

  9. How does that work? BMI is based on height so it can only increase if weight has increased at a faster rate than height.

  10. BMI’s a fucking useless measure. The doctor in that piece admits that it’s no good when it comes to assessing rugby players, because of course muscle is heavier than fat, but insists it’s still great for everyone else. There are plenty of doctors disagree with him. Since pretty much everyone these days is obsessed with going to the gym, I bet there are plenty of people whose muscles-to-fat ratio is making BMI stupid. According to the BMI measure, both Sylvester Stallone and Bruce Willis are obese. The big body-builders like Schwarzenegger, fair enough, ignore them as weird outliers. But Willis? I don’t think his kind of build is unusual these days. If a measure doesn’t work for the likes of him, it’s useless.

    One of my wife’s consultants — an excellent haematologist with a lot of cancer patients — refused to have anything to do with BMI and instead measured how fat patients were using the revolutionary method of looking at them.

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