On the rugby

So, yes, we won, for the third time this championship. And yet any of the four Southern Hemisphere teams would beat any of the Northern ones in any of the games I’ve seen so far.

Yes, Argentina too.

Six Nations is definitely second class rugby at present.

17 comments on “On the rugby

  1. Has anyone else been following the new Americas Championship?

    It comes to something when Wales v France looks like England v Italy on paper, and the game actually lives down to that.

    One suggestion, and this seems to work in all other forms of rugby: when there’s a scrum, don’t hang around until the scrum collapses, instead, put the ball in straight away.

  2. What Jack said; Barnes took a bloody age to allow the put in. Also, mandate proper shirts for props, not skin-tight teflon ones, both to facilitate binding and because the modern ones just don’t flatter us.

    Having sorted that out, we can get back to the important business of forcing a straight put in at the scrum. I thought the magic spray used by referees to mark the wall position for free kicks in the last assoc. world cup could be adopted.

  3. One trouble in 6N rugby is that too many of the players are unskillful – they are just poor footballers. Why, for instance, is it standard to pass to a stationary player? Why is it standard for the wide players to overrun the ball-carrier?

    Moreover, it’s all very well on TV to say that their execution lacks accuracy, but that misses the point that what they are trying to execute is anyway often miserably limited.

  4. But it is our second class rugby competition. Gave up watching years ago when they fiddled the rules to suit the TV. I once actually played rugby at Rugby School, not as far back as Webb Ellis but near enough.

  5. Is it just me that finds Union dull these days, rather like League used to be ( and presumably still is)?

    Ever since they allowed these sort of uncontested breakdowns where the ball is ‘recycled’ constantly time and time again, all the players have become identical types, because there is little difference between the the roles any more. They are all just like League players – big men mountains capable of battering away into the opposition time and time again until a mistake is made (hopefully by the oppo) from which a score can result. The speedy winger or three quarter beating his man with pace and movement (a la David Campese, or Serge Blanco) has been consigned to the history book, along with entertainment.

  6. Need to look at the refs and TMOs, Barnes didn’t let the game flow and the scrums were a mess partly because of him, at least he stood up to the TMO when he tried to bring something up, but again it was a dragged out issue.

  7. Whenever the folks that are in charge decide that they are going to make events under their purview better/safer/more reliable/more accurate/etc you just know that it’s going to make things worse. So it is with Scrums.

    When I see a professional ref that is short, powerfully built and smart I will allow the possibility that he/she might actually know something about the scrum. The skinny, lanky tossers should just realise what clueless twats they are and get the chuff out of the way of the game.

    Barnes, for one, hasnae the proverbial scoobie and I find it hard to believe that even he thinks that the front rows in the internationals that he refs will benefit from his ‘coaching’.

  8. Maybe doing something about defences that give up multiple penalties within 5 metre line would be a start

  9. The speedy winger or three quarter beating his man with pace and movement (a la David Campese, or Serge Blanco) has been consigned to the history book,

    Not in New Zealand: Cory Jane, Nehe Milner-Skudder, Ben Smith are all quite small men that win by guile and pace. And the current outside backs in Super Rugby are full of small quick men.

    I would suggest the problem is not the rules, if the best team in the world finds places for small men (Cruden is tiny).

    The problem is Northern Hemisphere coaches with limited ideas — and most importantly unprepared to play high risk rugby. Both Campese and Blanco were prone to failure too.

  10. big men mountains capable of battering away into the opposition time and time again until a mistake is made (hopefully by the oppo) from which a score can result. The speedy winger or three quarter beating his man with pace and movement (a la David Campese, or Serge Blanco) has been consigned to the history book, along with entertainment.

    Danny Care isn’t built like a brick shithouse, yet for some reason this 6 nations the England tries all seem to happen when he’s on the pitch.

  11. Is it just me that finds Union dull these days, rather like League used to be ( and presumably still is)?

    Fascinating you should say this, because that is exactly what’s happened (although I liked league and prefer how Union is now than how it was). As the game became professional, it needed to become more of a spectacle and so it sped up, meaning the ball was recycled after the tackle almost immediately. This meant the players needed to be huge, fast, fit battering rams rather than specialists.

    Note I’m describing both RL and RU there: for all the talk of RU replacing RL, RU has simply become very much like RL as it became professional.

  12. Maybe doing something about defences that give up multiple penalties within 5 metre line would be a start

    Jeez, Wales rode their luck on that one against France…

  13. Not in New Zealand: Cory Jane, Nehe Milner-Skudder, Ben Smith are all quite small men that win by guile and pace.

    Yup, and they’d slot seamlessly into an RL team as well.

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