Bollocks matey, bollocks

Problem gambling costs the UK up to £1.2bn a year, according to a report that its authors say should serve as a “wakeup call” to the government.

Gambling, whether problematic or not, costs the UK entirely and absolutely nothing at all. It’s just money circulating around between different people.

The IPPR said the largest costs were racked up in the health service and the welfare and criminal justice systems, which even the report’s most conservative estimates pitched at £260m.

Those are costs to the government of the UK. And amazingly enough, the government is not the country nor the economy.

Twats.

12 comments on “Bollocks matey, bollocks

  1. “Those are costs to the government of the UK. And amazingly enough, the government is not the country nor the economy.”

    I know I’m being especially dense this afternoon, but isn’t the government’s money money lifted from the pockets of the populace by taxation etc??

  2. While the government is not the economy it is part of the economy. The money spent of the problems follows to, the Gaurdian’s beloved, social workers. Obviously this is just a piece pointing out there is a problem that needs fixing because, think of the ???s. Later it will be used as evidence in a lobbying effort for more jobs.

  3. Hold up, Timmy.

    If it costs the government, it needs tax to fund it. Tax has deadweight costs.

    So I think it does cost the country: it costs us collectively the deadweight.

    Still makes their figures bollocks though.

  4. “Gambling, whether problematic or not, costs the UK entirely and absolutely nothing at all. It’s just money circulating around between different people.”

    I’m not so sure about that.
    The sort of people who gamble are the sort of people who’ll wait around doing fuck-all instead of working, hoping Dame Fortune’s going to dump a load of dosh in their laps. And I’d include the lottery in that. There’d be a lot more people digging themselves out of the shit they live if they hadn’t the illusory prospect of being sudden millionaires dangled in front of them. I’ve seen women shorting their kids on food so they can buy lottery tickets. The whole thing’s purest evil.

  5. What BIS said.

    I’ve had to evict a tenant because, as far as I could tell, she was spending her rent money on lottery tickets. And when I looked into her history, I wasn’t the first landlord to evict her.

    Camelot’s website has a limit on how many scratch cards one can buy- maximum £175 per day.

    However, the responsibility and the evil is down to those who do this, not those who organise the Lottery.

  6. “Problem gambling is an issue which affects millions of people across Britain each day.”

    Hyperbole much?

    ‘The IPPR said the largest costs were racked up in the health service and the welfare and criminal justice systems, which even the report’s most conservative estimates pitched at £260m.’

    If the cost is a problem, don’t spend it. The UK could simply choose not to spend that money. This is a prima fascia case that they SHOULDN’T spend the money. Welfare for gamblers is an indictment.

  7. Given which blog this is I shouldn’t have said “eschew”. “Forswear” would have been more suitable.

  8. I used to be a problem gambler losing 5k a year. I could only afford to lose 3k. Does the extent of my problem include all the losses or just the difference,? Just wondering .

  9. Chris Snowden nailed this one in his usual style.

    In 2004, it was predicted that the number of problem gamblers in the UK would double to 750,000 if the Gambling Bill became law.

    In 2013, it was reported that the number of problem gamblers had doubled in the previous six years and had reached 450,000.

    Last month, it was reported that the number of problem gamblers had doubled in the last three years and had reached 336,000.

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