Fuck Paul Mason, now he’s being dangerous

We all know that the ex-music teacher doesn’t know a rabbit’s fart about economics. But it’s fun enough to see him mobilising the masses, getting the would be Wolfie Smiths all orgasmic at overthrowing The Man. And then he descends into something actually dangerous:

The free-market economic model, combined with a globalised labour market, has produced a kind of reverse industrialisation.

because the entire economic system is geared to distributing the proceeds of globalisation upwards and its costs downwards.

the response of policymakers has been to prescribe simply more of the things that caused it: more free markets and more globalisation.

Carney is the first person with significant power in the western world to say that the medicine cannot work. It delivers slow growth, stagnating wages, falling productivity and rising inequality.

Call it what you will, it would no longer be globalisation as we know it, and it would reverse 30 years of free market labour reforms.
..
So in a situation where global growth is stagnant, providing your own population with decent jobs means attracting them from somewhere else.

That, in turn, will mean enacting a controlled, limited and reluctant step back from freemarket globalisation.

A new kind of capitalism, whose aim is to put the cheap labour exploiter out of business and promote high wages, will provoke howls of indignation from the economics profession and the asset-rich classes of the West. They revelled in the race to the bottom, as long as they got the upside of it. To unleash technology and revive productivity will take a big and careful rethink, above all about what redistribution policies work best in a highly complex and individualised consumer economy.

The flaccid little cunt.

Look, saying you’re going to tax me a little more, or a lot more, in order to raise the booze allowance on the dole is tiresome but not actually dangerous, even if you get to enact it it’s just tiresome, not dangerous. Shouting that there should be more investment, stronger unions, blah, blah, blah.

But you go messing with free market globalisation and you’re being dangerous. And we will look for you, we will find you, and we will kill you.

Because it is that free market globalisation which is bringing industrialisation to those peasant economies out there. Which, in turn, is what is lifting the tail end of humanity out of peasant destitution. As Branko Milanovic has pointed out the people who have really benefited from this process are the global poor. Which is why the past few decades of this free market globalisation have led to the largest fall in poverty in the history of our entire species.

Now the suggestion is that we, here in one of the richest countries in the world, where just the fucking dole (and it is just the fucking dole too, this is without any other benefit like housing, kiddies, whatever) puts you into the top 25% of global incomes, we should prevent, stop, reverse, this process just because there’re people working at hand car washes?

Fuck you Mason and the ideology you rode in on.

And if you really do try to slow down this free market globalisation thing I really will hunt you down. Jeebus man, the best thing that’s ever happened in the global economy and you want to stop it?

49 comments on “Fuck Paul Mason, now he’s being dangerous

  1. Tim and the other myriad great minds on this blog: Question: Who is more stupid, Paul Mason or Richard Murphy?

    Ordinarily this wouldn’t be a serious question. Murphy has certainly been by some margin the most preternaturally stupid and ignorant commentator arguably ever seen in the internet age. The kind of serially clueless individual so totally unaware of his own limitations that in a civilised age he would have been the subject of ribald mockery across every cultural medium in the land.

    However, this post from Mason – just, wow! I mean I know he worked for the Soviets but Holy Crap this is utter steaming bollocks:

    ‘If, instead of privatising public services, you ran them as non-profit corporations, providing rail, broadband and energy at prices below the cost of production, the redistributive effect would be significant. People on rock-bottom wages would suddenly have a lot more to live on.

    ‘On top of that you need to actively raise wages. That needs more than a worker on the board: it needs a recognised union rep in every workplace. If Amazon, Pret a Manger, the courier industry and the construction firms were obliged by law to negotiate with unions, and to cease repressing them, there would be upward pressure on wages across the whole economy. Another way of creating that pressure would be for local and national government to hike public sector pay.’

    It’s like he was in a coma for the 1970s – he has to know this is nonsense on stilts, surely.

    But no, Tim, as ever finds the smoking gun amidst the verbiage and the real goal becomes clear!

    ‘That, in turn, will mean enacting a controlled, limited and reluctant step back from freemarket globalisation.’

    There will not just be one North Korea – we’ll make 200 of them. It is a vision as Orwellian as I have ever seen committed to paper in a ‘quality’ publication. As you say, beyond dangerous – and for that reason he may have taken Murphy’s crown as ‘the most dangerous man In Britain, if not the world’

  2. From the article: “Five guys with rags can undercut a machine that cost tens of thousands of pounds to build, because the entire economic system is geared to distributing the proceeds of globalisation upwards and its costs downwards. ”

    As a commenter on the article mentioned, that is partly because mechanical car washes are rubbish and can wreck the paintwork.

    I rather see hand carwashes as being a terrible indictment on the countries that the guys (from what I’ve seen they are generally youngish men) come from – that it is better for them to work for low wages washing cars in the cold in this country than stay in their own.

  3. Mason is another middle-class Marxist prick.

    Somehow I can’t see the cunt as having sufficient clout to throw the worldwide spread of markets and prosperity into reverse. Regardless of how much of his bad breath gets crystallised on the pages of the Gladrag.

    Many of their so-called “contributors” will be looking for jobs in the hand car-wash business soon enough.

  4. Superb, Van Patten. I really enjoyed that.

    Belongs, quoted full length, on the back cover of that special comedy edition of “Joy of Tax”.

  5. If the only service needed was a quick wash down of the exterior of a car then a mechanical car wash will beat a bunch of guys with rags hands down on price and speed, and if Mason cared to actually do some research he’d know that the base price at a hand wash is about the same as a mechanical car wash, they are in direct competition, and if that was the only service provided the hand washes wouldn’t be in business. What hand washers can do in addition (and do well) is valet the inside of your car. Which can’t be done by machine. So if you want more than the standard exterior wash you go to a hand wash place. And maybe go there for your standard exterior washes too, because customer loyalty.

    Thus the growth in hand car washes is not really a substitution of people who used to go to mechanical washers now going to hand washers, with no increase in overall value or economic activity, what you now have is a massive increase in the amount of car valeting going on, above and beyond the existing market for exterior washing, as people are now wealthy enough to pay for their car to be cleaned inside as well as outside.

  6. So in a situation where global growth is stagnant, providing your own population with decent jobs means attracting them from somewhere else.

    OK, those foreigners abroad have been taking our jobs so we’ll do something to bring those jobs to the UK.

    However, I’m fairly sure he is an advocate of mass immigration, so he’s happy for all those foreigners abroad to come here and do those same jobs. So much for “providing for your population”.

  7. Jim is right. Hand car washes add value. For the price of an automated wash, the hand wash will usually include blacking of your tyres and washing of the door shuts.

    That said, my suspicion is that a lot of these car washes are fronts for money laundering. There are several nearby me, and I doubt every one generates enough profit to pay eight Romanians.

  8. As well as Mason having dangerous ideas, Jim points out there that the man is also ignorant.

    Just like Will Self, who apparently thinks the jobs in the new McDonald’s UK holding company will be to serve Big Macs.

    “Great jobs! Great jobs for everybody! Mine’s a Big Mac.”

    Because that’s what holding companies do.

    The Creed of Ignorance indeed.

  9. There are 4 reasons for the growth of hand washes

    a) garages closing. A machine needs a person around to watch/maintain it. Without the garage, you don’t get the car wash. If you have just a machine and a person looking after that machine, it’s not much more efficient than them doing the wash. It used to work because they were also manning the tills in the petrol station.
    b) they’re better than a machine
    c) you get your car washed while you do something else (like shopping)
    d) lots of immigrants prepared to do it.

    Anyway, can someone forward me the “creating jobs is now bad” memo? I clearly missed mine from the Guardian.

  10. “If Amazon, Pret a Manger, the courier industry and the construction firms were obliged by law to negotiate with unions, and to cease repressing them, there would be upward pressure on wages across the whole economy.”

    I’d love to know the last time Mason did a real job. Like, not in the public sector/lefty media. I’ve spent years in all sorts of companies, including manufacturing firms and not once heard people grumbling about lack of unionisation.

    Most of them fucking hate the unions, actually.

  11. I love the idea of Pret A Manger repressing the TGWU. Giggle.

    “Brothers! Let us free ourselves from these perveyors of quinoa sandwiches and rather delicious, if filling, Bakewell tart slices!”

  12. Bloke in Wiltshire

    You’re absolutely right – most people find them intensely irritating, and the Union representatives I have worked with who I thought were very good would have been very good in their role as an employee representative with or without the Union.

    Particularly entertaining was a Shop steward in Gloucester who was a staunch evangelical Christian, who when viewing CCTV footage of some of his workforce stealing product insisted that they face criminal charges on top of being dismissed. For him, his standards of conduct and behaviour were extremely high and he expected that his fellow employees would meet (or ar least try and meet) them. As a result of his conduct and refusal to defend the indefensible his workers invariably were given more favourable treatment by management than his counterpart’s workers in the other part of the business, where the shop steward was of a more conventional ‘worker good, management bad’ bent.

  13. Trade not aid. Trading with developing countries through global transport networks will bring those countries up to the same standard as the West. Just look at China.

  14. Mason objects to little brown chaps becoming kulaks. Which is odd as he presumably knows exactly how to deal with kulaks.

    P.S. What is this car-washing thing? Even in the driest parts of Britain it does rain from time to time.

  15. dearieme

    I, too am a wait for it to rain man. However, the annual service now frequently includes a run through the machine. Not particularly good, but it doesn’t show up separately on the bill.

    In any case, if there are hand washes, they obviously give more value as pointed out above. And good grief, with the number of unemployed, undereducated laddies and laddesses we have in the south of Spain, great. Keep some of them busy.

  16. As Jim says.

    My mechanical car wash charges £4.70 for its ‘basic’ wash, which is fine to get the outside looking OK. Once a week on average.

    Every now and then I take it to the hand place where for £25 a Polish swarm of locusts crawl all over the inside and outside of the car leaving it looking good as new.

    And I get a free air-freshener. Which comes in two scents from their homeland; “stench of decay of rotten concrete factories from failed socialism” or “sweat of enthusiastic and willing but high-maintenance pole dancer”

  17. While I don’t in any way disagree with your economic analysis Tim, nor your sentiments regarding this loathsome person’s idea, I do advise toning down the specific language (unless you specifically intended to carry out any actions.)
    Others in authority who don’t recognise your dry wit might otherwise feel the Section 4a of the Public Order Act 1986 might apply – and I’d miss your venting.

  18. “P.S. What is this car-washing thing? Even in the driest parts of Britain it does rain from time to time.”

    That used to be my approach, but not since moving here. The roads often resemble ploughed fields and it would take an Asian typhoon of epic proportions that mud off.

  19. I’ve been out most of the day and am *very* disappointed that no-one has pointed out that public transport *especially*, but not only, rail is provided at below cost. So Paul Mason is as (either deliberately or mind-bogglingly incompetently) as Murphy.
    A recognised union rep in my workplace? I work from home. No, I shall not have some oik employed by a union opposed to my principles sitting in my office watching me. “An Englidhman’s home is his castle” and the portcullis is downwhen a union rep knocks on *my* door.
    Car-wash – not just immigrants – my wife used to have our car washed in her office carpark by a group of people with learning disabilities who did an excellent job (until some jobsworth stopped it). I don’t think it was cheaper than a machine wash (probably a little more expensive) – just better and she chose to support the group – getting a better service was just a bonus.
    Paul Mason wants to make these people permanently unemployable by pushing up wages to the point where automation is cheaper. Much on the lines of Arthur Scargill’s attempts to create an underclass of permanently unemployed who would be his foot-soldiers cannonfodder for his revolution. I doubt that he is among the most dangerous indivisuals, just the most repulsive ones.

  20. Bloke in North Dorset said:
    “The roads often resemble ploughed fields and it would take an Asian typhoon of epic proportions that mud off.”

    Why do you need to wash it off? Just give the door a good slam if the mud is getting in the way.

    Anyway, I find the mud helps hold the remaining bits of trim in place.

  21. Dennis the Peasant – “Murphy is more dangerous, in the sense that you know Paul Mason, being a journalist and all, will never do anything other than talk and write.”

    Karl Marx never held down a real job in his life. Preferring to sponge off his mate Engels – to the point he could afford to keep a domestic servant that he knocked up. But he did a little work. He was a journalist.

    How did that work out for everyone?

    So was Mussolini come to think of it.

  22. dearieme – “What is this car-washing thing? Even in the driest parts of Britain it does rain from time to time.”

    Around where I used to live, there was a persistent rumour that the local car wash would do a special job on your car. They would muddy it.

    Apparently they had a couple of Bangladeshis who would get buckets of dirty water and mud, and they would spray your car down with it. To give your urban 4×4 that had never seen a dirt road in its life that authentic rural hunting-and-shooting look.

    I have no idea if this is true but looking around there were a reasonable number of suspicious looking cars.

  23. @john77, December 13, 2016 at 10:29 pm

    “I’ve been out most of the day and am *very* disappointed that no-one has pointed out that public transport *especially*, but not only, rail is provided at below cost.”

    Me: facepalm myself for overlooking that.

    Good point. iirc rail fares are ~50% of actual cost which is a massive subsidy.

    However, unsubsidised, but taxed (APD etc) city to city air travel is often faster, cheaper and more pleasant.

  24. Van_Patten – “Not sure if you have seen this particular gem – I think it would be entertaining for you to post on it, not least because I look forward to the inevitable fisking of the author by ‘the inimitable Steve’”

    I am reminded of something a wise old man said on the internet once: if you meet an ar$ehole, you’re out of luck. If you keep meeting ar$eholes every day, you’re the ar$ehole.

    I remember writing, “Go fuck yourself, 2011.” I called 2014 a “garbage year” and “the most dismal misery parade on record”. A year ago this week I wrote, “Perhaps the close of every year feels this borderline apocalyptic, and we simply lose perspective each time, but 2015 seems like it has to be the darkest year in my living memory.”

    Perhaps, sweet cheeks, the fault does not lie in our stars ….

  25. Pcar,

    “Good point. iirc rail fares are ~50% of actual cost which is a massive subsidy.

    However, unsubsidised, but taxed (APD etc) city to city air travel is often faster, cheaper and more pleasant.”

    There isn’t just one airline.

    It’s why buses are cheaper. And make a profit. Trains should be cheaper than buses. They have a huge train, so more scale, don’t pay fuel duty, don’t pay tax. But they cost more. And the reason is simply that they have a monopoly on a route that’s clear for them. A bus is fighting through congestion, a train isn’t. If you had dedicated bus roads where any vehicle requiring a PSV could go on for a toll, you’d destroy most of the railways.

  26. However, unsubsidised, but taxed (APD etc) city to city air travel is often faster, cheaper and more pleasant.

    It’s an astonishing indictment of the “service” we get on the trains, that a fucking airport is more pleasant.

  27. “If you had dedicated bus roads where any vehicle requiring a PSV could go on for a toll, you’d destroy most of the railways.”

    Wasn’t there a proposal years ago (and didn’t a country, Sweden springs to mind) to convert rail lines to dedicated bus routes? I have often thought the solution to rail transport problems would be to get rid of the rails and just have dedicated public transport roads that go right into the centre of the cities with no disruption at all. You could even allow lorries on them perhaps as well.

  28. @TW
    Wise words from Martin Audley.
    Your piece finding good things to say about National Action
    suggests you are in the process of losing it..

  29. DBCReed

    No more than any post, especially the ones about Carol Wilcox ‘displaying her customary good humour’ from you suggests,far from losing it, you never had it in the first place… I’d suggest any column by Mason would breach Section 4a straight off the bat as well, before we even start on Richard Murphy

  30. Jim,

    “Wasn’t there a proposal years ago (and didn’t a country, Sweden springs to mind) to convert rail lines to dedicated bus routes? I have often thought the solution to rail transport problems would be to get rid of the rails and just have dedicated public transport roads that go right into the centre of the cities with no disruption at all. You could even allow lorries on them perhaps as well.”

    Come to think of it, the simple answer would be variable pricing. There would be plenty of capacity at say, 3am, so let the trucks and cars use them. Around 6am, start ramping the price up and people will get on buses (or maybe just have restrictive hours for non-bus transport)

  31. @VP
    So you are comparing Carol Wilcox with National Action? You don’t know Carol Wilcox so what has she said or written that possibly compares to National Action’s extrusions
    (which may sound alright to you but you obviously lack sound judgement) ?

  32. DBCReed

    So Tim pointed out the importance of Freedom of Speech, and that banning people because you disagree with their views, however odious they may be is the thin end of the wedge, and you have taken such a piece as ‘finding good things’ to say about them?

    Wilcox I agree does not advocate discrimination on racial grounds but is certainly opposed to the idea of private wealth, advocating confiscatory taxation at all levels of society, combined with significant state control of vast swathes of the economy – effectively turning the UK into a state along the lines of the USSR and North Korea. For someone like you such policies might seem evidence of ‘good humour’ but for many on this blog they are not far from being as threatening as National action and should be treated as very much in the same ballpark in terms of odiousness. 150 million people would agree with me, as Mr Ecks often says, had they not been killed off by the kind of ideology she espouses…..

  33. @VP
    Some indication of how good humoured Carol Wilcox is that she does not sue you for libel, (assuming you have some real existence and are not some randomly generated entity.)
    Carol Wilcox good naturedly organises a motley collection of eccentrics who are foolish enough to hope (as also do Tim Worstall of this parish and Martin Wolf of FT ,the World’s pre-eminent Economics journalist ),that this country would be better off for having a Land Value Tax, as originally proposed by the likes of Adam Smith.If you think that this measure has wiped out 150 million million million people, or such figures as Mr X produces, then you are the world’s biggest loony and should enter some American contest to prove it. In the meantime do not insult people who are better than you.

  34. @Bloke in Wiltshire, December 14, 2016 at 10:29 am

    “Pcar wrote:
    “Good point. iirc rail fares are ~50% of actual cost which is a massive subsidy.

    However, unsubsidised, but taxed (APD etc) city to city air travel is often faster, cheaper and more pleasant.”

    .
    “There isn’t just one airline.

    It’s why buses are cheaper. And make a profit. Trains should be cheaper than buses. They have a huge train, so more scale, don’t pay fuel duty, don’t pay tax. But they cost more. And the reason is simply that they have a monopoly on a route that’s clear for them.”

    Major really botched BR privatisation and nobody since has attempted to fix it.

    Auctioning slots (like airports) is my preference.

    0800 Edinbugh London – Virgin
    0815 Edinbugh London – Arriva
    0830 Edinbugh London – First Group
    0845 Edinbugh London – Was GNER

  35. DBCReed

    If you seriously think Carol Wilcox is better than anyone I would suggest you seek serious psychiatric help – And am happy to go with a libel case if that helps expose her- some of the links posted from YouTube by the many non-trolls here are frankly grotesque and certainly not for the faint-hearted.

    Your blithe dismissal of counter-arguments and casual disregard for the dead make you at best a ‘useful idiot’ and at worst the Socialist cliche spouting bot that many have long suspected you to be. It is indeed fortunate for you that Tim takes a far more liberal approach to freedom of expression than either Murphy or Wilcox lest you be sued for libel…

  36. @VP
    As usual no extensive quotation of Carol Wilcox’s offending words, just your “summary” plus uncontrolled indignation.
    I would be interested to read your version of how Land Value Tax, first set out in English by Adam Smith, (her principal political interest to which she has devoted a lot of her life) has been responsible for all those dead you and Mr X
    see before you when at the keyboard.

  37. @DBCReed

    You evidently do not read the frequent contributions on TRUK from Wilcox(Although she has not been as vocal there because Murphy backed Owen Smith), nor have access to her Facebook feed (she was sufficiently po-faced and humourlessly doling out Marxist drivel during honest discussions between a mutual acquaintance and I that I actually blocked her on Facebook) which suggests a degree of obsession which I am guessing you share.

    If she limited her comments to the LVT then I might have a more benign view but sadly the references to other Marxist aspects (abolition of private schools and extreme dislike for free enterprise perhaps colour my view of her. As you know her personally then obviously this colours your view of her as well – apologies if you want chapter and verse but I don;t have time to continually bring over comments from TRUK….

  38. VP Puzzled by your remarks I looked up Carol Wilcox on Google; then more narrowly at Carol Wilcox Labour and found all of her quotes were on Land Value Tax ( including an impromptu speech at a Labour Party Conference )plus one piece on defence.
    I am sure you will conclude that your reliance on TRUK has given you a mistaken impression of her.If you think criticism of public schools and the free enterprise system is a sure, legally watertight indication of mass murdering tendencies then you should stay in more.

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