Err, whut?

What really gets her, Jane admits, is that in her affluent area, so many who need a food parcel are severely ill or disabled. “We have a blind man who comes in, and someone who’s deaf,” she says. They’ve now started to deliver to housebound people with disabilities who can’t get out to get a food parcel. Jane sees it is like this: the food bank is a microcosm of what’s wrong with the country, but just as much, what is good about people.

Evidence that free people, acting spontaneously and voluntarily, are solving the problems of government incompetence is evidence that we’ve a problem? Not evidence that free people acting spontaneously and voluntarily is the solution?

23 comments on “Err, whut?

  1. Beyond the failure/delay of the state’s “welfare” system is the fact that the cases of genuine need will reveal that the antics of the state have helped to cause, if not directly caused, the reduced economic circs of the poor.

    Much food bankery is leftist fraud. The impoverished that they may actually be helped will often have been knocked into their poverty by the same so-helpful state.

  2. “North Paddington food bank is in one of the wealthiest parts of London”

    Yes, so, why the fuck are poor people living there with all the increased costs?

    I’ll bet we could move these people to Hull, pay them the difference in their housing benefit in cash and they’d be fine.

  3. I remember in the mid-1990s getting some free tins of beef to reduce the European food mountain. I can’t remember how I found out about it, I just went somewhere with my UB40. I certainly don’t remember cries of pain that giving away free food to the unemployed was indicative of societal breakdown.

  4. More free grub from the food bank equals dole money saved to spend on whatever your vice is.

    I have no problem with food banks. I do have a problem with people using them as an indicator of poverty.

    There is always going to be demand for free stuff. Economics, innit.

  5. ‘She’s familiar with illness – she was a health journalist’

    And journalism is a serious disease.

  6. Ecksy

    “…the antics of the state have helped to cause, if not directly caused, the reduced economic circs of the poor.”

    What are you thinking of there?

    Putting aside the disabled and the sick, I’d say that most poverty is either a lifestyle choice to live on benefits or a result of ill-advised life choices ( aka stupidity).

  7. Oblong, quite. Food banks seem to be a supply led phenomenon, so that CM Scum© can then complain about how many people “have” to use food banks.

    If you offer people free stuff, they’ll take it.

  8. Theo–Inflation, regulation, taxation, general down-by-law bullshit. They don’t massively ruin massive numbers but marginal people are hurt the worst. And of course migration driving down already low paid jobs. Nobody sees the jobs that no longer exist or misses the jobs that might have existed under a lighter hand.

  9. “I’d say that most poverty is either a lifestyle choice to live on benefits or a result of ill-advised life choices ( aka stupidity).”

    I read somewhere (and I’m racking my brain to try and remember where) that studies had shown that one can assess 3 year old children in certain psychological traits (and very early learned behaviours) and predict to some stunning degree (70-80% accuracy) who will end up in crime, poverty, benefits etc.

    I’ve always said that if you don’t drum into your children the concept of deferred gratification you are condemning them to shitty lives, because thats the one thing that will allow them to improve their lot more than anything else will.

  10. @Jim

    I only skim read, but I think you’ve misinterpreted that. It’s saying that 20% of the population account for those things.. and people who score lower in the tests are more likely to be in that 20%. Not that the 20% at the bottom in the tests is the 20% of population doing all the crime etc.

    It seems to suggest that the 20% is the same group people for all the things, but as it’s the Mail I wouldn’t necessarily count on that being the case.

  11. “I’ve always said that if you don’t drum into your children the concept of deferred gratification you are condemning them to shitty lives, because thats the one thing that will allow them to improve their lot more than anything else will.”

    This. If it’s the one lesson I manage to teach my kids, I’ll have succeded as a parent.

  12. @TTG: I did wonder – they weren’t exactly very clear on that point. But this article does seem to imply that the study is saying that the 20% who use the most state services were also the bottom 20% of the childhood tests:

    http://metro.co.uk/2016/12/13/simple-brain-test-at-age-three-can-tell-if-someone-will-be-a-criminal-or-dole-claimant-6320022/

    They did follow the same 1000 people from age 3 to 38 so the study has been going on for a long time, so one would assume the comparison between initial test score and subsequent behaviour could be made.

  13. “I have no problem with food banks. I do have a problem with people using them as an indicator of poverty.”

    The media and the Trussell Trust have lied about food bank use to this end. They first referred to how many people used food banks. When people started asking questions, it turned out that number was actually donations. Then they said how hard it was to get referred, only for people to find out that it was a doddle. Then they said there was a limit on donations, only for people to find out there basically isn’t, that it’s really a guideline.

    Not saying there aren’t people who have problems because of the system, and that they need help, but the fact is that food bank use increased as unemployment fell.

  14. “…if you don’t drum into your children the concept of deferred gratification you are condemning them to shitty lives, because thats the one thing that will allow them to improve their lot more than anything else will.”

    Indeed. Which is why thrift is – or used to be – the quintessential middle class (and aspiring to be middle class) virtue.

  15. “The media and the Trussell Trust have lied about food bank use to this end.”

    The greatest reasons for the increase in the use of food banks are likely to be knowledge of their existence, ease of access, new ones opening, and what is on offer. The last one is very important; they aren’t just handing out food. Top-ups for pre-pay meters, nappies, children’s clothes and shoes are all routinely given out now. This stuff is expensive, and also easy to sell on…

  16. There’s a young man in my area, he goes to the food bank and gets a bunch of stuff. He takes it to his granddad who lives alone – the food for a family of 4 lasts the old guy a couple of weeks.
    The young man doesn’t need the food bank, he gets by. He does like doing nice things for his granddad. Who is neither rich nor poor.

    Everyone benefits.

  17. If we’re talking about short-term support then for practical purposes food bank use is way down on ’09/10. Back then the voucher was in the way of cash from the DWP – a budgeting loan or crisis loan – and the food bank was the supermarket where the money was spent. If we tot up the reduction in DWP loans since then, and add in the food bank vouchers, there’s been a net reduction in crisis hand-outs.
    ( although the DWP loans are repayable ).
    The Trussell Trust and the public who contribute are the best of guys and gals. And far more effective than their continental cousins sucking at the EU’s tit.

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