Hmmm

A long-quiet yet huge supervolcano that lies under 500,000 people in Italy may be waking up and approaching a “critical state,” scientists report this week in the journal Nature Communications.

Based on physical measurements and computer modeling, “we propose that magma could be approaching the CDP [critical degassing pressure] at Campi Flegrei, a volcano in the metropolitan area of Naples, one of the most densely inhabited areas in the world, and where accelerating deformation and heating are currently being observed,” wrote the scientists—who are led by Giovanni Chiodini of the Italian National Institute of Geophysics in Rome.

All long known about of course. Just one thing:

A smaller but still sizable eruption was observed at the supervolcano in 1538. That event lasted eight days and created the mountain Monte Nuovo. But since then, the volcano has been quiet, slumbering for more than 500 years.

I spent a couple of years of my childhood living on Monte Nuovo.

25 comments on “Hmmm

  1. A smaller but still sizable eruption was observed at the supervolcano in 1538. That event lasted eight days and created the mountain Monte Nuovo.

    500 years ago a volcano created a mountain and they still call it Monte Nuovo? If it erupts, what will they call any new one it creates? Nuovo Nuovo?

    The more interesting question is that scientists these days are media whores and can’t wait to say something to get them coverage. But even if they weren’t, does the threat of jail mean they have to squeal like a pig?

  2. I wonder if the jailing of those people over that earthquake means that even the slightest risk will now result in an OMG This Is It warning, making it impossible for the authorities to plan or react to a real emergency?

  3. “500 years ago a volcano created a mountain and they still call it Monte Nuovo? ”

    After 1000+ years, New College, Oxford is still called New College…

  4. abacab – “After 1000+ years, New College, Oxford is still called New College…”

    Seems reasonable. Actually as soon as I posted that I realised that Naples, aka Nea polis, is still called Naples.

  5. I used to be Operations manager at a factory in N. Ireland where the “New Mill” dated back to 1760 and was about the oldest factory in the UK.

    It was a magnificent brick and stone item with superb canadian parquet flooring, by the way as they tended to be in those days.

  6. abacab: “After 1000+ years, New College, Oxford is still called New College…”

    A friend of mine was an undergraduate at New College when a visiting Yank asked him “Say, how old is this Noo College, anyway?” “Oh, about 1379”, said my friend. “NOO College!?”

  7. Took an American friend to the New Inn somewhere near Oxford a few years ago. It was only a converted barn, but for some reason she kept repeating “this pub is older than my country!”

    Only got worse when I spotted a little plaque saying that my old college owned it… 🙂

  8. “Rob, cannot have it both ways. Either they warn for every last little possibility or they get done.”

    Yes, that’s the problem. That conviction was bonkers

  9. The Americans think 100 years is a long time and the British think 100 miles is a long way.

    Whoever first said that should pat himself on the back.

  10. Well without wishing to lower the tone, (well it IS Christmas) the New Testament is pretty sodding old as well…

  11. “I spent a couple of years of my childhood living on Monte Nuovo.”

    Do a Murphy. Claim that, in many ways, you’re like the people caught up in the Vesuvius eruption in 79 AD.

  12. @dearieme, December 23, 2016 at 3:49 pm
    “The Americans think 100 years is a long time and the British think 100 miles is a long way.”

    ….and in Ulster 10 miles is a long way.

  13. The Newport next to Cardiff has a town charter dating back to the 1300’s and the church dates back to 5th century.
    Was shown the oldest colonial building in Vancouver and was quite amused that a grew up in a house that was older than the building. Part of the issue is so much was built from wood that it didn’t survive.

  14. Bill Bryson wrote something to the effect that there were more 17th century buildings in his little Yorkshire hamlet than in the whole of North America.

  15. Naples dates back to the Bronze Age but gets its name from a re-founding of the city in the sixth century B.C.

    By way of contrast Nablus – also “New City” – is positively modern. Vespasian founded in it 72 AD.

    Britain is to Italy as the US is to Britain when it comes to old stuff.

  16. When you’ve been living in a house, part of the structure is Roman, 1379 can be regarded as very Johnny come lately.

  17. @dearieme, December 23, 2016 at 9:59 pm
    <i“.and in Ulster 10 miles is a long way”: and four hundred years is the blink of an eye."

    Ah yes, the UK’s 1688 Glorious Revolution which led to the creation of the Bank of England, the foundations for the Industrial Revolution and most of the progress Adam Smith wrote about

    Another 72 years until 400th anniversary.

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