Yes, there really are idiots out there

Appearing on the Kremlin-funded channel last month, Mr Hedley said: “It’s very clear in our rule book, we’re in an antagonistic relationship with the managers and with the bosses. We want to overthrow capitalism and create a socialist form of society.”

The lack of historical awareness is just astonishing.

And consider the different reaction to someone saying that that Benito had the right idea….hmm, actually, that’s Spud isn’t it?

25 comments on “Yes, there really are idiots out there

  1. I can see an excellent case being made for any praise of socialism being punished with exile. Let these people have all the socialism they want… somewhere else. And stop them having any kind of public presence or attention.

  2. Steve Hedley, who is paid £71,000 a year as senior assistant general secretary of the RMT

    Assistant to the general secretary.

  3. “It’s very clear in our rule book, we’re in an antagonistic relationship with the managers and with the bosses. We want to overthrow capitalism and create a socialist form of society.”

    Which is why the Union types typically turn into the nastiest, most antagonistic managers when promoted. Cos they really, really believe in the antagonism aspect.

  4. It is blowhard fantasy island bullshit anyway.

    And I say that as someone who would happily see the back of the Leopard-Print Bag and her gang if someone better could replace her.

    Ideally me.

  5. “Assistant to the general secretary.”

    senior assistant.

    How many assistants does a trade union General Secretary need?

    “It’s very clear in our rule book, we’re in an antagonistic relationship with the managers and with the bosses. We want to overthrow capitalism and create a socialist form of society.”

    And there was me naively thinking there job was to look after the interests of their members. Of course in the private sector that’s what they do because they know being antagonistic for political ends will likely lead to the business going bust and their members losing their jobs.

    I’m not a fan of too many laws limiting workers rights, being in the minority here I believe on the right to strike, but in sectors like the railway where there’s no real competition that right needs to be severely limited.

  6. No no, it’s all about safety. All of their strikes are about safely. And once the huge pay rise is safely in the bag, the strike ends.

  7. @BiND

    I agree with you. I think a few changes in the law are needed though. My suggestions below.

    One: no payer reciprocity, no right to strike. So no, if you make a living from money taken at gunpoint (tax), you don’t get a right to not turn up. That would include working on public sector contracts, so no you can’t refuse to build that carrier or drive that train.

    Two: industrial action by your staff cannot count as Force Majeure in a contract. It’s in your control: hire militant leftists, that’s your fault; treat non-leftists bad enough they start behaving like leftists, that’s your fault too.

  8. Two: industrial action by your staff cannot count as Force Majeure in a contract. It’s in your control: hire militant leftists, that’s your fault; treat non-leftists bad enough they start behaving like leftists, that’s your fault too.

    You’d have to abolish TUPE first. The rail companies HAVE to employ the fuckwit lefties who fucked up the last time around, it’s the law.

    It’s one of the main reasons why our railways are shit – head office cones and goes, but the people on the ground who don’t give a shit remain. Public or private, doesn’t matter. If your country doesn’t have a service culture, one where it is considered an obligation to fucking do things properly (Japan, Switzerland, Germany spring to mind), areas such as the railways will always be a joke. It’s the people on the front line who make the difference, always.

  9. Hi Rob

    I agreed that something needs to be done about TUPE. Maybe not abolished, but something as it has screwed up the railways.

    That said, Point One takes away the right to strike if you suckle at the taxpayer’s teat, which the railways (and particularly Southern right now) do.

  10. I’ve used a soft workaround for Force Majeure in general, which is to have a term in there about if it persists for a certain time, the contract is terminated. Not great, but it gives some protection.

    I’d rather have the “industrial action” bit removed altogether, then negotiated back in – if at all – under strict limitations.

  11. The UK would be significantly better if we treated membership of CND or any trotskyite organisation as we treat members of the BNP. No job in the state sector, no invitations to the BBC etc. I find the whole “they are well meaning” absolutely vile – the BNP want what is best as well. Relativism. When people talk about the banality of evil – the true examples of this are people like Corbyn or Seumas.

  12. The strikes I disagree with are in monopoly industries. If Morrison’s staff go on strike you can go to Sainsbury’s. If Stagecoach go on strike you can use FirstBus. If TransPennine go on strike you can use Northern Rail. If Southern Rail go on strike you’re stuck. Strikes should be used to punish the employer by depriving them of their customers and force them to change the employment relationship, not to punish the customers who have no power to change the employment relationship.

  13. Bloke in North Dorset – “How many assistants does a trade union General Secretary need?”

    That coffee doesn’t make itself!

    We should ask MI6 or whoever, now they have nothing better to do, to go through the work forces of important industries and recommend people to be fired.

    There is no reason why we should tolerate people who fought for a Soviet victory.

  14. Anecdotal:

    On my trips there, I was surprised at how shit the vaunted German rail service was. Might just have been a run of bad luck, of course.

    But according to a friend we visited, the trains were okay until the unions tried playing up and got away with it; they’ve not been so good since.

  15. DBB infrastructure was very good when I used it, I think they had a shorter refurbishment and replacement cycle than UK.

    I have been delayed in CH by leaves on the track.

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