Blimey, this is a bit dangerous

The Supreme Court has sought responses from the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and Enforcement Directorate (ED) on a PIL alleging that journalists were paid Rs 50 crore for writing in favour of the AgustaWestland deal.

Journos can be prosecuted for taking kickbacks?

Quick, alert the media!

That their bosses could get a bit pissed off and fire them seems fair enough. But the government?

8 comments on “Blimey, this is a bit dangerous

  1. In India? Come on. The Saudis pay a lot of people really quite small amounts of money to make sure they write nice things about them. It is hardly unknown in India either.

    Presumably they wrote nice things about the side of the deal that the relevant Minister did not want to win.

    Incidentally, people are reporting that large parts of India’s economy has shut down because of the withdrawal of all those nice large denomination notes. The BJP has been given a gift in terms of its opponents, but it seems so very determined to lose.

  2. The UK’s more advanced democratic system sends Plod in at dawn to arrest journos and eventually bring them to trial where they are found (with one exception) not guilty.

  3. The Saudis pay a lot of people really quite small amounts of money to make sure they write nice things about them.

    One of the FT journalists on Twitter was moaning about how Uzbekistan took out a full-page advert in their paper and made it look like an editorial saying how great the country was. I asked him why the FT accepted the money if they didn’t like it. I never got a response.

  4. “Journos can be prosecuted for taking kickbacks?”

    Can be in England and Wales, too. (I don’t generally keep up with the vagaries of Scottish law.) Bribery Act 2010. It’s now illegal to accept payment to ‘improperly’ do your job.

  5. Gamecock – “Journos will have to be satisfied with just going to the best parties.”

    What I used to like about the Spectator book reviews is that there was clearly a tight little circle of people who all reviewed each others books. It was an odd circle with some very unusual people being involved. I think that has largely ended – presumably because Auberon Waugh held it all together. Their book reviews are not good these days. The major publishers seem to be freezing them out.

    Dave – “It’s now illegal to accept payment to ‘improperly’ do your job.”

    So it should be. Not sure if it should be a law, but if you are stealing from your employer it ought to be a crime. If you are using their prestige or capital or whatever to give your brother-in-law a sweet contract, or extort blowjobs from the intern or whatever, it ought to be unacceptable.

    It is one thing for the owner to prostitute his company. But he ought to have a reasonable expectation of loyalty from the staff.

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