Ho Yus! Ban the bad thing! Ban it, ban it!

Plastic bag tax is fuelling spread of food poisoning as people do not wrap raw meat separately

Because there never is a good reason that behaviours evolve, is there?

23 comments on “Ho Yus! Ban the bad thing! Ban it, ban it!

  1. Have they even put a tax on the small transparent plastic bags one puts meats, veg and fruit in? I assumed it was only the bigger bags at checkout.

  2. And all this is after any comestibles have been coughed over, poked with grimy fingers, dropped and returned to the shelf and even worse…

    It’s a wonder we all don’t get salmonella by just walking past a shelf in some supermarkets!

  3. Dongguan John:
    They don’t tax those small transparent ones you use for the carrots and such.
    If you have any packaged raw meat or fish the cashier usually offers to put this in a carrier bag, and for these they won’t charge the 5p.

  4. > Who carries raw meat without it being wrapped up? It comes in a packet.

    Per the article, “bacteria can lurk on the outside of packaging as well as on the inside”. Even though you’ll cook your chicken, the bacteria could have been transferred onto e.g. your apples, which may be eaten raw.

    Lord knows how we survived before the invention of plastic bags.

  5. I suspect that “food poisoning” is a lot less common than reports of it would suggest. I’ve lost count of the visitors down here who reckons they’ve suffered “food poisoning” eating much stuff as the rest of us.
    I think there’s entirely something else going on.
    I think people are far too fastidious about food. The insistence that it’s handled, stored & prepared in almost surgical conditions. A reliance on a lot of pre-prepared & partially pre-prepared ingredients. Their resistance to quite normal levels of contamination have been eroded due to lack of challenge. Expose them to the real world & it’s whoops with the heaves & shits.
    Myself, I clued this years ago. I hardly wash anything before eating & am intentionally sloppy. Last time I had a bad gut was years ago. And that includes a sojourn out in the boonies of Algeria where I don’t think they’ve heard of refrigerators & attempting to get stuff from your plate to your mouth, before the flies intercepted it, was a challenge

  6. BiS – obviously you don’t have curry houses in Spain, then. RoP food hygiene is wiping the crap off the left hand onto a nearby surface before serving your food with it.No wonder your last bout was in Algeria. Just to think – there probably isn’t an Arab word for ‘turd’.

  7. I suspect that “food poisoning” is a lot less common than reports of it would suggest. I’ve lost count of the visitors down here who reckons they’ve suffered “food poisoning” eating much stuff as the rest of us.

    Absolutely. There is such a thing as a stomach upset which is very, very, very different from food poisoning in that it won’t kill you. But any time somebody has a dicky tummy these days they scream “food poisoning”. I remember being sick on a plane from a bog-standard stomach upset, and the crew insisted they write it up as food poisoning and then lectured me on not boarding a plane with food poisoning. I was fine by the time we landed, some 7 hours later. You’d not recover like that from food poisoning.

  8. Those of us who have had food poisoning tend to view someone with a dodgy tummy as not having food poisoning.

  9. I’m the only person on earth to spend 3 months travelling in India and end up with constipation. It was a drag, I’m usually resistant to stomach problems.

  10. I’ve had real food poisoning three times in my life. The last bout had me in stage four hypovolemic shock with a bag of lactated Ringer’s solution in my arm, a pulse of 170 and a blood pressure of 180/60. My peripheral vision was shutting down and my extremities were blue. I went down to 61 kg which made me look like I’d had a relaxing holiday in Treblinka.

    I’m not particularly concerned about contamination from beef or pork (although not totally blasé either) but I do make sure the boy bagging my groceries in the supermarket puts chicken in a separate bag, and while I’m prepping it I am militant about washing hands and surfaces with which it comes in contact.

    The bag thing is bollocks anyway. Carrier bags here are made from OXO-biodegradable plastics which only persist for a few months in the environment before breaking down but won’t degrade anaerobically. You never see them stuck in trees or anything like that. The only problem is they’re bloody useless for long-term storage.

  11. “Is that a carrot in your pocket or…”

    Unintended opportunities for innuendo created by the bag tax.

  12. @Andrew M
    “Even though you’ll cook your chicken, the bacteria could have been transferred onto e.g. your apples, which may be eaten raw.”
    Then surely that could have been a problem before the tax?

  13. We do have curry houses down here, Witchie. For the tourists. Can’t say I know a single Spaniard’d go near the shite. My Colombiana residente once tried a forkful of Iceland chicken Madras & came close to chucking it up. Where I live up north, Lille, I think there may be a few Indians. F**k knows who eats in them. Certainly none of the French, I know. The made-up-cuisine the Brits call Indian must be the vilest on the planet. And I’ve eaten Sierra Leone.
    And you misconstrue. Didn’t have the slightest problem with gut-rot in Algeria. It’s only England, I ever get it.

    But Asian restaurants:
    Lawyer I know has an office in E. London. Owns the building. Next door’s an Indian, he’s been known to eat in. Or did. He had a flooding problem with the sewers, into his basement. Wanted some advice. We went next door to find out if they’d the same. They did. But for them it’s not the filing archive, it’s the kitchen. Not saying they’d closed, of course. Oh no! Kitchen staff are paddling about with rolled-up trousers through 6 inches of floating shit. Stink was appalling.

  14. @anon: Then surely that could have been a problem before the tax?

    Yes. The savvy shopper segregates various food items in his cart to ensure there is no cross-contamination. The problem then arises at the check-out, where a dyspeptic teenager with a bad case of acne throws everything pell-mell into a heap, thus disturbing the boundaries that you had carefully erected between the various food groups in the cart. The free plastic bag is provided to prevent this outcome.

    Before the bag tax, the only people who were subject to cross-contamination thus were the ones who didn’t understand enough about the food they were buying to keep incompatible items away from each other in the first place. These we would like to eliminate from the gene pool, most of them being leftists and SJWs of various stripes anyway, so there was no real harm done. Darwin at work.

  15. Pingback: When Food Poisoning Isn’t | White Sun of the Desert

  16. @bis: a sojourn out in the boonies of Algeria where … attempting to get stuff from your plate to your mouth, before the flies intercepted it, was a challenge

    I recall such an outing. In Tunisia, at the Hotel Marhala next to the Shott el Jerid. My brother quipped that you had to wave your knife at the heap of flies on the table to get them to fly up for an instant, thus uncovering the butter they were sitting on. Good times, good times.

  17. Um…

    Aren’t a lot of commentards forgetting that different toxins will have different effects on different people? The same level of contamination that sends one person to the hospital can leave another with a mild stomach ache.

    Returning to plastic bags, I never put meat into the cotton totes I somehow ended up with. My concern is less about food poisoning and more about the damn bags stinking in the cupboard. As it take dozens, if not hundreds of thousands, of uses of a reusable tote to have less environmental impact* than disposable plastic the last thing I want to do is wash the damn things more frequently.

    * Assuming the plastic is disposed of responsibly. If it is just chucked out the car window a duck might choke on it before it degrades. On the other hand a plastic grocery bag used as a can liner is infinitely better for the environment than carrying boxed can liners home in a cotton tote.

  18. @bloke in spain, January 4, 2017 at 11:30 am
    “I suspect that “food poisoning” is a lot less common than reports of it would suggest. I’ve lost count of the visitors down here who reckons they’ve suffered “food poisoning” eating much stuff as the rest of us.

    I think there’s entirely something else going on.
    I think people are far too fastidious about food. The insistence that it’s handled, stored & prepared in almost surgical conditions. A reliance on a lot of pre-prepared & partially pre-prepared ingredients.

    Their resistance to quite normal levels of contamination have been eroded due to lack of challenge. Expose them to the real world & it’s whoops with the heaves & shits.

    Myself, I clued this years ago. I hardly wash anything before eating & am intentionally sloppy. Last time I had a bad gut was years ago”

    +1

    I would have written the same about myself.

  19. I’ve had food poisoning a number of times from stuff bought from the local supermarket, none of which were comparable to the one dose of “gastric flu” I suffered 30-odd years ago.
    But, going back to the original post, the plastic bag tax has no effect on separate wrapping of raw meat so the UKIPgraph article is utter bullshit.

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