Terrors, eh? Terrors

The traffic measures are designed to allow for the construction of a new access road into the field where the exploration will take place. Over the next three months Cuadrilla plans to develop a site roughly the size of a rugby pitch, creating a well pad lined with an impermeable membrane to protect the environment.

In April, it hopes to begin drilling down thousands of feet into the rock to take samples and assess the best trajectory for horizontal wells that will, for the first time in the UK, extend out into the shale rocks beneath nearby homes.

A whole rugby pitch!

33 comments on “Terrors, eh? Terrors

  1. Most of that rugby pitch will be taken up by storage of containers and drill pipe, chemicals in tote tanks, offices (in containers), parking, etc. The actual drilling rig will measure about 10m x 10m. The hole will be about a foot across, maybe two.

    for the first time in the UK, extend out into the shale rocks beneath nearby homes.

    So a bit like coal mines then, only much smaller, much further down, and far less prone to causing subsidence.

  2. “So a bit like coal mines then, only much smaller, much further down, and far less prone to causing subsidence.”
    And without the slag heaps, deaths, injuries, chronic illnesses and economy crippling strikes.

  3. There’s a well site in South Dorset I’ve been to – tucked away in the woods near an RSPB reserve, behind a cottage. It’s about the size of a rugby pitch, is silent and completely invisible unless you know it’s there.

  4. @BiND

    “And without the slag heaps, deaths, injuries, chronic illnesses and economy crippling strikes.”

    No wonder the lefties are so opposed. Less human suffering that good old working-class coal.

  5. However the eco-doomsters dress up their opposition to fracking with talk of contaminated groundwater and earthquakes, they are opposed to it because it involves production of a cheap fossil fuel. Because climate change.

  6. “There’s a well site in South Dorset I’ve been to – tucked away in the woods near an RSPB reserve, behind a cottage. It’s about the size of a rugby pitch, is silent and completely invisible unless you know it’s there.”

    Do you mean Wytch Farm? Scroll down to this photo.

    Its amazing how many people don’t even know it exists yet its a stunning example of how drilling and fracking can take place in a sensitive area to the benefit of all concerned.

  7. I note the threat :

    Like the traffic lights, Thursday’s small-scale protest is also expected to represent only the modest beginning.

    is almost an invitation from the DT ?

    The weather will help the drillers for a while…. – and of course any protesters won’t be using nasty fossil fuels to keep warm and cook… No mention of FoE lies here either – cn’t help thinking that if Cuadrilla had been panned by the ASA – the piece would have mentioned it several times.

  8. And without the slag heaps, deaths, injuries, chronic illnesses and economy crippling strikes.

    To the Left that’s a feature, which overrides all the other bugs.

  9. There’s a well site in South Dorset I’ve been to – tucked away in the woods near an RSPB reserve, behind a cottage. It’s about the size of a rugby pitch, is silent and completely invisible unless you know it’s there.

    Yeah, it’s an old BP one, since been sold. Even I was surprised to learn that the UK had onshore oil production.

  10. Theophrastus – “However the eco-doomsters dress up their opposition to fracking with talk of contaminated groundwater and earthquakes, they are opposed to it because it involves production of a cheap fossil fuel. Because climate change.”

    Not quite. They are opposed to it because it involves production of a cheap fossil fuel. Therefore climate change.

    They don’t really believe in climate change. They just hate cheap energy. Remember Amory Lovins saying that Cold Fusion promised cheap, clean energy which would be like giving a gun to a baby.

  11. The anti-frackers are the worst eco-scum of all and you can be sure that all local rags joining in the anti-fracking chorus are written by Uni-trained Marxist shite.

    End all “qualifications” to be a journalist and purge the Unis NOW.

  12. Everybody knows the well head will be small: its all the horizontal drilling outwards that puts the fear of God into the locals who, living in the countryside , tend to be middle class and to welcome environmental troublemakers who are often not left-wing.
    If a proposal is made to cover a beauty spot in an industrial estate with many jobs, the lefties will attack the conservationists.
    This is so obvious , you wonder how many people on here actually live in the UK, so dense is the understanding of class attitudes.

  13. “They don’t really believe in climate change. They just hate cheap energy. ”

    Control you see. Cheap energy means freedom for the masses. Can’t have that, need to keep them nicely supplicant at the socialist tit…………sorry I mean ‘saving the planet through controlled energy consumption’.

  14. ” its all the horizontal drilling outwards that puts the fear of God into the locals who, living in the countryside , tend to be middle class and to welcome environmental troublemakers who are often not left-wing.”

    Have the middle class locals of rural England been rehabilitated by the Left then for their temerity to vote for Brexit? Or are they simultaneously racist Little Englander bigots AND brave comrades standing shoulder to shoulder with the SJWs in the fight against er cheap energy for the masses?

  15. @BIND and @Tim – yes, Wytch Farm (in a previous life I worked on it and have been to out to Furzey Island and so on). The specific wellsite I was thinking of is in Arne and almost no-one knows it’s there as a satellite development. I think Perenco, the privately-held French company who bought it from BP, have since brought a number of satellite pads onto production. They’ve spent a lot of money bringing production up on the field. I was looking for that specific panorama shot earlier and couldn’t find it.

    Anyone who’s in the area and fancies a stroll – you can leave your car just off the Corfe Castle roundabout and walk up into the woods (public footpaths everywhere). You can get right up to the fence line on the main processing site, and then be surprised at how concealed it all is, Everything was designed to be lower than usual, with downcast lighting and lots of brown paint to blend in from a distance. From the Corfe Castle viewpoint most people need to have it pointed out to them – and one of the local councillors said “I’d almost forgotten you’re there”.

  16. I guess reference to a rugby pitch rather than a football pitch was because the story was in the Telegraph.

    Meanwhile an iceberg a quarter of the size of Wales is about to break off and float around in the Antarctic.

    And I recall a story about artillery able to hit a tennis court from 5 miles (or something).

    There really ought to be an official list of what different area sizes should be described as.

  17. Further on the iceberg.

    The presenter asked the expert what impact this might have on wildlife and he replied to the effect that if it floated up to a coastline which penguins fed from then it could interrupt this.

    And I now have a picture of two penguins on the beach staring up at this iceberg a few yards from them, with one saying “F*** me! I’m sure that wasn’t there last night”

  18. There really ought to be an official list of what different area sizes should be described as.

    “A planet the size of Ritchie’s ego has proven immune to the gravitational effects of a nearby black hole…”

  19. @BiND: coal mines don’t give you slag heaps. It’s doing metallurgy (e.g. iron smelting) that gives you slag heaps.

  20. @DBC Reed: Everybody knows the well head will be small: its all the horizontal drilling outwards that puts the fear of God into the locals who, living in the countryside , tend to be middle class and to welcome environmental troublemakers who are often not left-wing.

    I don’t know how this goes in the UK, but in the US where I live in upstate NY you can tell the difference between the locals and the New Yorkers with vacation homes just by looking at the sign on their front lawns. For locals, it’s “Repeal the FIRE act” (FIRE being a particularly egregious gun control law enacted by the state) and, during the recent election, “TRUMP PENCE” and “Make America Great Again”. The vacation homes are identified by the combination of “Ban Fracking” and “Hillary”.

    The locals in upstate New York would love to have fracking in the state (it’s currently prohibited) because it would provide jobs and the possibility of wealth for those with enough farmland. The New Yorkers want to keep it banned for the same reason. They don’t have a lot of land (a half acre or so for their house and the garage with the Subaru), and the existence of local jobs would make it more expensive for them to have their lawns mowed and their pools cleaned by the rubes. Plus it would change the distribution of status in an undesirable direction, toward people with pick-up trucks as opposed to Subarus. So definitely not a good thing from their perspective.

    I’ll leave it to you to work out who are the leftists and who are the conservatives in this.

  21. @Hedgehog
    The class system and attitudes to fracking are identical in the UK: the working-class locals welcome anything that might provide jobs; the middle class don’t like anything that indicates the existence of the 21st (and 20th) century or might threaten the inflated land values of their bijoux properties.
    Anybody who lives in this country is aware that the working-class values the chance to make a decent living over keeping the countryside unchanged.

  22. The thing is, the likes of DBC Reed would cream themselves if Jeremy Corbyn announced tomorrow that his policy was to reopen all the coal mines and build new steel blast furnaces across the land. Then it would be ‘Fuck the environment Comrade, lets get the new 5 Year Plan in motion immediately!’.

  23. dearieme

    “@BiND: coal mines don’t give you slag heaps. It’s doing metallurgy (e.g. iron smelting) that gives you slag heaps.”

    That may be so, but when I were a lad growing up in Yorkshire in the early ’60s they were slag ‘eaps, and to me they’re still slag ‘eaps.

  24. Yes, I live not far from Wytch Farm. The largest onshore oil field in Europe and you would hardly know it was there.

    We’ve also had a nuclear power station since the 50s (being decommissioned now). That’s rather bigger, but still most people tend to forget it’s there.

  25. Here’s an old article about it. Been there for years, hasn’t caused any problems, but the eco-loons still think it’s dangerous.

  26. Richard,

    You’ll be looking forward to the eco friendly Navitus off shore wind farm then 🙂

  27. Flatcap Army – “The specific wellsite I was thinking of is in Arne and almost no-one knows it’s there as a satellite development.”

    Arne? You mean in Poole – that Arne? Well knock me down with a banana. I did not know that was there.

    There is a very significant bird sanctuary there. Run by the w@nkers in the RSPB. It must be literally next door.

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