Yes, jolly good

His most memorable dispatch from France came after an unidentified aircraft had aroused a fever of speculation by crashing and scattering grenades across the runway at Orly. For whom was this deadly cargo intended? Ottaway was sent to investigate, and came back with a crisp one-line telegram: “Grenade is French for pomegranate.”

11 comments on “Yes, jolly good

  1. A good investigative journalist would have found out where the pomegranates came from, their destination, the supplier, the pilot, the purchaser and also the answer to the glaring question why on earth were pomegranates were being transported by plane.

  2. Interesting how this:

    OTTAWAY Mark on 22nd December 2016, aged 77, former Sunday Times travel writer, after a short illness, at home, in peace. Brother of Richard and Rosemary and a loving and much loved friend.

    Published in The Times on Dec. 29, 2016 http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/timesonline-uk/obituary.aspx?pid=183237166

    became this at your link:

    The early brain tumour was not the end of his struggles with ill health; a catalogue of unpleasant illnesses culminated in recurring bouts of cancer. There was no drama in his decision to take his own life, just his customary forethought, careful preparation and generosity to his friends, to whom he left a large sum of money for a party at the Chelsea Arts Club.

  3. Years ago we were in Lewes; on the wall of a Building Society there grew a pomegranate tree. In flower it was a thing of rare beauty. Is it still there?

  4. Hallowed Be, you’re missing the absolutely crucial piece of information: the current market value of the pilot’s house.

  5. A natural mistake. Although fruit spoils quickly and needs to be moved quickly to market, it is not usually all that high in value. People don’t fly fruit much.

    Grenades on the other hand are usually of much more interest to their intended consumers and people normally pay to fly them about the place.

  6. So Much For Subtlety — “Although fruit spoils quickly needs to be moved to market” – yeah bananas… picked green, need to get to market before they ripen. Banana boats are known as Ferraris of the sea, travel twice as fast as normal freight carriers. Still not worth air freight – that’s for flowers and i phones.

  7. Banana boats have special enviromental controls as well, to ensure that the bananas ripen at exactly the right time.

  8. Hallowed Be – “Banana boats are known as Ferraris of the sea, travel twice as fast as normal freight carriers.”

    And when the bananas have to be loaded, they have to be loaded. You can’t wait around with them sitting on the dock. Hence:

    Day-o, day-o
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home
    Day, me say day, me say day, me say day
    Me say day, me say day-o
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home

    Work all night on a drink of rum
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home
    Stack banana till de mornin’ come
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home

    Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home
    Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home

    Lift six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home
    Six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
    Daylight come and me wan’ go home

    Presumably it is better to move them in the cool of the night. That’s probably a whole bunch of micro-aggressions now.

  9. You missed the verse about:

    Beautiful bunch of bright banana

    Highly deadly black tarantula

    🙂

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