Because Mummy really should slave over a hot stove

That she doesn’t shows that she doesn’t love the little ones:

Britain’s booming restaurant culture is fuelling record levels of childhood obesity, with today’s children spending at least twice as much time spent eating out as previous generations did, experts have warned.

Health officials said families no longer behaved as though dining out was a “treat” and have instead allowed restaurant meals and fast food to become a major part of youngsters’ weekly diet.

Jeepers.

Dr Alison Tedstone, PHE chief nutritionist told the Telegraph: “Going out for a meal is part of Britain’s culture but instead of being a weekly ‘treat’ for families, it’s becoming the norm and contributing to the obesity epidemic.”

No one went out for meals up to WWII. It was, believe it or not, the Berni Steak House which was the treat after that. Before it was pretty much hotel dining rooms and that was it. And it didn’t become common enough to be a treat, rather than for high and holy days only, until what, the 70s? 80s?

All of this moaning just confirming something we should al understand. There’s no one quite as conservative as the modern day progressive.

Back into the kitchens you feminist hags! Back to the 1960s!

23 comments on “Because Mummy really should slave over a hot stove

  1. “She said parents needed help – including calorie labelling on menus – to look after their children’s health.”

    We already have this for the chains like McDonalds, don’t we?

  2. Back into the kitchens you feminist hags! Back to the 1960s!

    Apart from the dubious idea that parents are too stupid to work out what their children shouldn’t eat in a restaurant so therefore they should choose all their child’s meals, this seems reasonable to me. The government should have a policy to encourage women to do what most of them would like to do – stay at home and have more children. Cook for them too perhaps.

  3. There’s nothing cogent behind this, just the usual miserable desire to find out whatever it is people are doing and tell them not to. Luckily, hortatory remarks from some non-entity at PHE, whatever the fuck that is, are likely to have little bearing on the eating habits of Britons. Nutritionism is junk science, anyway.

  4. Julia,

    ““She said parents needed help – including calorie labelling on menus – to look after their children’s health.”

    We already have this for the chains like McDonalds, don’t we?”

    When they labelled menus in New York they found that the poor were selecting food to give themselves the highest calories/$ they could afford. Not the outcome the health fascists predicted.

    When our son was young we found that the best quality time was going out for a meal once a week. No distractions meant we would sit and talk to each other. Yes, I know we could do that at home but we weren’t disciplined and with our busy life’s it was a nice treat.

  5. > the best quality time was going out for a meal once a week. No distractions …

    No chance of that these days. The kids would have their smartphones out before you’d even ordered the drinks.

  6. No one went out for meals up to WWII.

    Lyons Tea Shops and Corner Houses were apparently rather popular.

  7. “No one went out for meals up to WWII. It was, believe it or not, the Berni Steak House which was the treat after that.”
    There were cafes and restaurants and, of course, fish and chip shops, but Wimpy would be a better analogy than Berni steak houses. Berni steak houses were high class (to this impoverished young apprentice :-)).

    A Chinese meal in a genuine Chinese restaurant with flock wallpaper; now that was a once a week or once a fortnight luxury. 🙂

  8. Oh, I’d be all in favour of a law passed preventing British parents taking their children to restaurants.
    Any chance of it being made to apply worldwide?

  9. JuliaM,

    “We already have this for the chains like McDonalds, don’t we?”

    Indeed. When I was losing lots of weight, part of the way I did it was selecting the better things on the Subway menu.

    But most of it is irrelevant. A healthy diet is more fruit, grilled food, etc, and less cake, sugar , deep fried food. The exact numbers don’t matter. All you have to know is which is the better option. OK, sometimes that can be hard to determine, but it’s not worth worrying about the difference between the grilled fish and grilled chicken. Both are better than the sweet and sour chicken.

    And if people don’t know this, they’re liars. We’ve had decades of public information saying this. Most chunky people aren’t chunky because of information but because they like the taste of lattes and black forest gateau.

  10. All Public Health England employees with a body mass index ≥25kg/m2 should be summarily dismissed.

    UKAD should be put in charge of ensuring that all PHE employees (from the top down) comply with ‘Healthy’ activities to the same standard as publicly funded athletes, random testing to be performed and all employees to participate in the reporting regime.

  11. “…the Berni Steak House which was the treat after that. ”

    I would’ve thought it was one of the many Italian Trattorias set up by ex-PoW’s after the war?

  12. We should have more food stalls, take outs and restaurants, then we can all convert our kitchens to bedrooms and voila housing crisis solved. If you really must pass laws for our benefit, outlaw deliveries, drive thrus and only allow parking 100 yards away. Make the fatties walk, they won’t mind.

  13. Ahhh . . . I see the problem: it’s Health officials.

    Don’t just dismiss the lot, lock ’em up.

  14. When we are too tired we have a takeaway. When we are out travelling we eat out.
    Its our choice every time, not someone else imposing their choices on us.

    Back when we were kids we were pretty poor so a chip shop meal was a real treat, perhaps once or twice a year. If that.
    As an adult I like fish and chips, or chicken and chips so its more a once or twice a week thing. When getting up at 10pm I don’t always want to have the wife cook a meal.

  15. “We’ve had decades of public information saying this”: indeed, but it seems overwhelmingly likely to be false, and very possibly lies.

  16. “And it didn’t become common enough to be a treat, rather than for high and holy days only, until what, the 70s? 80s?”

    I think you’d have had to be terribly provincial for it to be as late as that. 60s, I’d say, based on my experience.

  17. When I was a kid eating out was a rare treat. We were only allowed to go to The Ritz once a week (although to be fair we were allowed to The Savoy twice a week).

  18. In 1985 my dad got a much better job and we suddenly had money. My mom started taking my brother and I to McDonald’s after school instead of cooking herself. We both then gained a lot of weight. The eating out argument makes kids fat is most definitely valid.

    Since there is no linked article my question is:

    Is this someone trying to offer good advice to the general public or are they trying to say the government should do something?

    If it is the former then why complain? Kids are better off when they have a parent, typically the mother, teaching them how to do things like cook a proper meal.

    If it is the latter then valid thing to complain about.

  19. “Obesity is a disease of the poor”
    “Obesity is caused by families eating out in restaurants so often that restaurant food is a major part of children’s diets”
    Make your mind up!

  20. @Jonathan, January 8, 2017 at 1:01 pm

    “…the Berni Steak House which was the treat after that. ”

    I would’ve thought it was one of the many Italian Trattorias set up by ex-PoW’s after the war?

    Berni Inns were the first low cost available to all restaurants in UK. The relatively few Italian Trattorias, whilst lower cost than Hotels, were still expensive.

    Ref: BBC Timeshift: Spicing Up Britain – How Eating Out Went Exotic

  21. Wasn’t there something called, approximately, Aberdeen Angus Steakhouses?

    Aha, WKPD to the rescue.

    “Aberdeen Steak Houses was started in the early 1960s by Reginald Eastwood …The décor was opulent, with plate glass windows and red velour banquettes. Menus included trendy dishes like prawn cocktail and Black Forest gateau. The Good Food Guide of the 1960s listed the restaurants.”

  22. I have some sympathy with the idea that it’s better to eat in than out. Too many incentives to eat too much.

    That said, you can’t complain about this AND simultaneously proclaim that this generation is poorer than the previous ones.

  23. Pingback: Britain’s “Restaurant” Culture | White Sun of the Desert

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