Professors says we should all be poorer

We could leave the EU to cut trade to reduce emissions, to bolster local business, reduce trade deficits, close down tax haven activity, cut the tax gap by imposing capital controls, increase wages by favouring UK employment and leading the way in how to make the global economy local.

There’s quite a bit more nationalism to the socialism than usual, isn’t there?

25 comments on “Professors says we should all be poorer

  1. “increase wages by favouring UK employment”

    Oh dear. This is officially a hate crime now. Richie is a hater.

    Anyway, it is Tuesday so it is Hairshirt Day. I have noticed that Richie’s Green Autarky persona posts mainly on Tuesdays.

  2. leading the way in how to make the global economy local.

    Anyone who wants to make the economy local is welcome to move to the north of Scotland and eat only locally sourced food for a year.

  3. How does one man generate so much twaddle ?

    What is scarier is that he was apparently, for a while -considered capable and responsible enough to advise the Labour Party on economics (that’s right innit?) – but he weren’t batty enough!

    I suppose though – that he provides a useful service in that with all the “experts” doing the rounds (Blanchflower etc.) it makes people think a bit about what’s being said / proposed and apply the insights gained from figuring out twattery in one place to more general application.

    But dang… – he’s a prodigious spouter.

  4. There’s quite a bit more nationalism to the socialism than usual, isn’t there?

    Not really – IME all socialism is pretty damn nationalist.

  5. He’s done this often.

    Murphy’s core beliefs and favoured policies are not possible within the EU, indeed they’re anti-EU.

    One day, the penny might drop.

    Corbyn is the same, but Leave is the cause that dare not speak its name.

  6. “One day, the penny might drop.”

    Unlikely. Professor Spud has too many strong mental defences against awareness of his own self-contradictions. If the barriers collapsed or even leaked, he’d probably have a nervous breakdown.

  7. Theo,
    It’s not just Himself though.

    Hardline anti-neoliberals tend also to be hardline Remainers.

    Corbyn is stuck in the middle of this. He’s anti-EU, and always has been, because he’s a proper socialist, or likes to think so. But his army of young idealists see the EU as the fount of peace, beauty and free loveliness.

    It’s hilarious, that’s what it is.

  8. We could leave the EU to cut trade to reduce emissions, to bolster local business, reduce trade deficits, close down tax haven activity, cut the tax gap by imposing capital controls, increase wages by favouring UK employment and leading the way in how to make the global economy local.

    So mainly living in caves and eating dung then?

  9. Many on the Left are pro-EU because most Tories are anti. They simply csnnot bear the thought of sharing a belief with the Right, so end up wrestling with ridiculous contradictions.

  10. Diogenes

    “I see he is back to Venn diagrams.”

    Oh FFS – these ones are tedious, boring and unoriginal, but at least they’re not his mind maps, which are cast iron grounds for any competent mental health professional to pursue his compulsory committal in an institution for ECT treatment, if not reintroduction of full lobotomy surgery.

  11. Jack C
    Yes, it’s hilarious. That said, Corbyn and many other anti-neoliberals seem fairly secure in their socialist faith and its associated delusions. The Murphatollah doesn’t. His politics is one in which he is invariably right and in which he implicitly posits himself as being in control. When he is shown to be wrong about something, all he can do is deny it and/or persuade himself that he held that view all along.

  12. MC – “So mainly living in caves and eating dung then?”

    Has anyone asked these idiots how much cotton grows in the UK? How much coffee? Or tea? How much pepper? Cinnamon? Nutmeg?

    We may be moving to an All Silicon renewable future and we will probably never run out of silicon oxide, but solar power cells need germanium. Where is that going to come from? They usually need gallium? Where can we mine that locally? They also use selenium and tellurium. The UK is not a major producer of either of those.

    But even if we get the trace amounts we need, they will need long wire cables. Aluminium and copper mostly. Aluminium is found all over the place but as far as I know there is no UK deposit that is economic to mine. And copper? Where in the UK can we mine that?

    This is not even mentioning the natural gas that we import and I assume we will not be fracking for.

    So caves, dung and furs is not far off the mark.

  13. Diogenes – “Are you applying for a politics course at City Uni, any time soon?”

    I don’t know, do they have an interview? Mind you if they are charging £8000 a year, it is criminal.

    I was also wrong about the tea. Scotland has the Wee Tea plantation. So the UK produces, in theory, some tea. Although I don’t know if they are an actual tea producer or just a tourism rip off like Nessie.

  14. Artisanal selenium mines are all very well, but I bet you the cretinous Spud would be all in favour of Mao’s idea of every family having its own little smelting operation. Of course this turned out to be a fairly inefficient way of turning iron ore into low-grade slag while denuding the country of trees but hey, at least it was local.

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