Blimey, being an economics prof is more glamorous than I thought!

Mark Perry lists the things he used in one day:

Mexico (NAFTA member): Blackberries, avocado, Lee jeans

2. Guatemala: Bananas

3. Sri Lanka: Cinnamon

4. Colombia: Coffee

5. Canada (NAFTA member): Maple syrup, Carr’s crackers

6. France: Ciroc vodka, Pinot Noir wine

7. Switzerland: Gruyere cheese, Rado watch

8. China: Grey cashmere scarf (pictured above), leather gloves (pictured above), Jos A. Bank leather jacket, HP Elitebook laptop I’m using to write this post.

9. Korea: Stocking cap (pictured above), and Samsung Avant Galaxy Smartphone

10. Vietnam: Shirt

11. Portugal: Ecco Shoes

There are some errors in there of course. No economic journalist, as opposed to a professor, would make the mistake of drinking French vodka for example. And maple syrup on either gruyere or bananas seems to be going a bit far.

23 comments on “Blimey, being an economics prof is more glamorous than I thought!

  1. The Ciroc vodka is actually what’s known as eau-de-vie. It’s made from grapes, so it’s like the liquor that goes into the barrels to make cognac. You can buy eau-de-vie in supermarkets (I use it for pickling fruit).

    That said, it’s backed by P Diddy or whatever he calls himself this week, so yeah, Mark Perry is rather gangsta.

  2. Does the Prof give an analysis of added-value by country, otherwise this list is meaningless. It looks to me as if the major part of the profit is going to France and Switzerland.

  3. He must be quite well off if he’s sluicing down French Pinot Noir. Central Otago Pinot Noir is far better value.

    The Carr’s bikes look rather like a product of the Carlisle company. Are they now Canadian-owned, or do they have a factory in Canada?

    He looks a bit old to be flouncing about in jeans and a leather jacker with a cashmere scarf. Maybe he’s brain-damaged from the lead in the water in Flint? He should sue the City Council.

  4. Any politician or president who would take away those global choices from me and my millions of fellow American consumers, or make those choices of imported goods more expensive for us by imposing tariffs, duties or border taxes should be seen as the cruel, anti-consumer, anti-freedom, wealth-destroying, job-destroying, prosperity-reducing, despotic, tyrannical, autocratic, evil, clueless and dictatorial bullies that they really are.

    Yeah, give me convenience or give me death, says the tax sucking lamprey of a tenured professor who, in all probability, hasn’t wandered off-campus in decades.

    Fuck him and the horse he rode in.

    And, because he’s too lazy to put down his French vodka (French?) and address the issue he raises with either seriousness or intellectual honesty, he conveniently builds a straw man out of Trump’s concern for American workers…

    Fuck him. Fuck him twice.

    The fact that his fat ass is resting in Flint, Michigan makes his little diatribe all the more repulsively out of touch with reality.

  5. Maybe he’s brain-damaged from the lead in the water in Flint?

    The good professor’s sort of arrogant stupidity isn’t the product of contaminants, it’s the product of being educated well beyond his intellectual capacity. I took a degree in Economics myself, and I suffered with his sort of jerk-off for four years…

    The sort of guy who’d happily tell you how to run the national economy but couldn’t manage a hot dog stand for one day without fucking it up to high heaven.

  6. And let’s not overlook just how trite Perry’s article is.

    I distinctly remember getting a handout of very similar content from the stoner Graduate Assistant who taught my Econ 101 class back in 1976.

  7. “It looks to me as if the major part of the profit is going to France and ….”

    Perhaps; but Ciroc is owned by Diageo.

    “Central Otago Pinot Noir is far better value.”

    I am not enthusiastic about French pinot noir, but even the best NZ pinot noir tastes like raspberry juice.

  8. Theo, so what is the point of highlighting the source of these goods? The moral is that the bulk of the value added goes to well-off countries. How much of the HP laptop’s sale price stays in China?

  9. The sort of guy who’d happily tell you how to run the national economy but couldn’t manage a hot dog stand for one day without fucking it up to high heaven.

    That’s the plot of The Apprentice: take a dozen blokes who think they know everything, and watch as they fail at the simplest tasks. What I wouldn’t give to see the likes of Owen Jones in that environment.

  10. “Central Otago Pinot Noir is far better value.”

    I am not enthusiastic about French pinot noir, but even the best NZ pinot noir tastes like raspberry juice.”

    Personally, I love Burgundy and I’ve tried Otago as a cheaper substittute but find it lacks the subtlety or complexity (I prefer more complexity to more fruit). But what’s the alternative for a Pinot Noir fan?

  11. “But what’s the alternative for a Pinot Noir fan?”

    Learn to love claret? (Agreed, NZ pinot lacks any complexity.)

  12. “…the bulk of the value added goes to well-off countries. How much of the HP laptop’s sale price stays in China?”

    Quite so. I was just making the point that identifying where the value-added ends up is more complex than pointing at the country of origin.

  13. Swiss pinot noir. Particularly from the eastern parts.

    My red of choice, although I’m hardly a connoisseur.

  14. What I wouldn’t give to see the likes of Owen Jones in that environment.

    I think before he’d get a slot on The Apprentice he’d have to age sufficiently to look like he’s outgrown training pants. Personally, I’d have trouble taking a thirty-something prat who looks all of twelve terribly seriously. Oh course, the fact that he writes for the Guardian doesn’t help either.

  15. Theo, I guess it is no surprise that neither Perry nor his commentators showed any awareness of that issue

  16. Theophrastus,

    “Learn to love claret?”

    But claret prices are crazy, too! And I’m OK there. I have cabernet and merlot alternatives that I like.

  17. Theo, I guess it is no surprise that neither Perry nor his commentators showed any awareness of that issue.

    Actually, that issue was ignored by Perry and his commentators because it wasn’t germane to the issue at hand… Which happened to be an entirely politically motived attack by a (no doubt) liberal Democrat of an economist on Donald Trump’s trade policies.

    Surprise!

  18. Perry is a libertarian.

    Do you actually know what a libertarian is?

    A guy who is certain he’ll never have to suffer any negative consequences from the policies he advocates.

    That’s what a libertarian is.

  19. If Marie Antoinette had been a libertarian economist, what she would have said was…

    “Well, until the peasantry can obtain training for new careers and then find positions in their chosen fields of employment, they should probably seek out a flour-based comestible that would serve as an appropriate substitute for bread. Something like cake, perhaps.”

    Perry is a tenured professor at a land grant university… He has the luxury of not worrying about whether he’ll have a job to go to six months from now.

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