The delights of The Guardian’s readers

Reducing absolute poverty is exactly what is so detrimental for us as a species. It is our consumption that is destroying this planet for us. It’s what’s behind climate change and it’s why we have started the sixth mass extinction. It’s our success that is the problem.
Reducing poverty is just another way of saying ‘increase consumption’.
Obviously this is a nasty reality -or inconvenient truth if you will-but this doesn’t stop it from being the truth.

Sigh.

19 comments on “The delights of The Guardian’s readers

  1. It has come to something when the rancid Malthusians are seen as the caring and progressive ones, even if only by themselves.

  2. She’s got hers and the rest of the world can piss up its leg and play with the steam for all she cares.

    Eco-freak CM bullshit.

  3. Well yeah. The question is whether you prefer poverty, hunger and suffering or you would rather see the poor clothed and fed.

    I don’t think consumption is a bad thing. It is poverty that is destructive of the environment. The sooner we end it, the sooner the planet will start to improve.

  4. I would love to think that the ‘human being’ that wrote that meant relative poverty rather than absolute poverty, but….

    Anyway, let’s keep the darkies hungry, eh, what! I’m alright Jack!

    What’s good for me is bad for you and the planet. So sod off and keep being a good very poor person.

  5. It is nice, however, to see someone who actually understands the real-world results of their philosophy – no matter that those results are horrible.

    *That* sort of person might even be amenable to reason, unlike the normal sort who thinks ‘relative poverty’ is important and that we can actually live comfortable lives after massive reductions in consumption.

  6. LinkedIn knows her:

    Listed by ELLE Magazine as one of “12 women changing the world“, Minna Salami is a Nigerian-Finnish writer, blogger, speaker, feminist thinker, global change advocate and consultant, as well as the founder of MsAfropolitan, a multiple award-winning feminist blog which has been visited several millions of times since launching in 2010.

    Minna writes comment for the UK Guardian, as well as a monthly column for The Guardian Nigeria and a Huffington Post blog. She is a member of Duke University’s Global Educator Network as well as the Guardian Africa Network and Guardian Books Network. Minna sits on the board of UK Charity For Books’ Sake and UK think tank, Signifier UK. In 2016, Minna joined the leading climate change organisation, Friends of the Earth, to work as a consultant on the groundbreaking BIG IDEAS project.

    Minna was awarded an Honorary Fellowship in Writing at the Hong Kong Baptist University, and she is a frequent guest speaker at universities around the world including Duke University, Georgetown University and University of the West Indies. She is a commentator on the BBC, Deutsche Welle, TV Ontario and SVT, Sweden. She has curated events at the Victoria & Albert museum and hosted workshops in the UK and internationally. Minna presents her talks about global change, feminism, Africa, racial politics, media, popular culture and thought leadership around the world – in South Africa, Norway, Nigeria, Gabon, Morocco, France, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, China, the Gambia, Austria, Belgium, the Netherlands and the USA. Her 2014 TEDx Talk has received over 100, 000 views.

    School of Oriental and African Studies, U. of London
    MA Gender Studies Grade First Class Honours, Distinction
    African & black feminism
    Gender in African history and Yoruba philosophy

    University of Lund, Sweden
    BA Political Science

    Cambridge Professional Academy, London
    CIM Professional Diploma Marketing

  7. Listed by ELLE Magazine as one of “12 women changing the world“

    God help the World, especially the poorer parts of it.

    Looking at that entry on Wikipedia, I wonder if she ever wails that black people are marginalised and their voices not heard?

  8. “Most of that reduction has been in China, which has pulled half a billion people out of poverty in 40 years…using policies that are nothing whatsoever like free-market neoliberalism.”

    Yes. If they’d fully burnt down communism and state control, they’d probably have pulled the rest of them out by now.

    I’ve been reading up on North Korea, and the Hyundai institute reckons that wages have gone from $850 to around $1000 in 3 years. That’s what, 5% a year? And that’s just from some tiny reforms to agriculture and micro businesses. That’s all. Still shit, but that’s how little you have to do from communism to get good growth.

  9. “We can learn a lot from the commons movement. For example, as the campaigner Phil Byrne argues, Wikipedia provides a model of how we can manage our oceans, forests and climate.”

    No, you can’t. Wikipedia isn’t really “commons” like oceans. It’s people voluntarily giving up their time and money to do something. Wikipedia and open source stuff is hardcore libertarian.

  10. Andrew K

    I assumed here bio was a joke – how do we know that she isn’t actually an ‘Alt right’ plant who has a false image and underneath it is some caucasian 50 year old male writing this shit to discredit the progressive cause – the very name ‘mine’s a salami’ implies it’s a wind -up….

  11. Dear Mr Worstall

    Judging by her LinkedIn profile above she seems to have a nice fat ‘carbon’ footprint.

    Is keeping the poor poor just her way of generating a ‘carbon’ offset? Assuming she “cares” about global warming in the approved manner.*

    DP
    * Bring it on. Much better than global cooling, and all that extra CO2 is plant food, helping to make the poor less poor.

  12. …Minna Salami is a Nigerian-Finnish writer, blogger, speaker, feminist thinker, global change advocate and consultant, as well as the founder of MsAfropolitan, a multiple award-winning feminist blog which has been visited several millions of times since launching in 2010.

    Isn’t that a rather pretentious and long-winded way of stating Minna Salami is freelance writer and blogger?

    Serious question: Can anyone here say “Minna Salami” out loud without laughing? I can’t.

  13. Dennis

    That’s why I assume it has to be a clever spoof. I appreciate I am a heterosexist, misogynist, whit dinosaur who is soon to be extinct but if I were sharing a platform with this cretin I’d be in stitches every time her name was said…..

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