Hmmm

‘Get your t*** out, show us your m****’: Drunken yob hit with £8,400 bill for abusing stewardess

Most impolite to be sure but if those stories about those who work for the airlines are true that seems very expensive for a peek at something widely shared, no?

26 comments on “Hmmm

  1. Dunno. From recent air travel experience, the cabin crew seemed divided between pursed lipped munters & shall we say; young men of a joyous disposition. For the former it seems unlikely & for the latter – better not to go there, eh?

  2. A little bit more than pissed up banter:

    “Miss Emmerson said: “He proceeded to shout a verbal tirade of abuse, such as: ‘F*** off, square go, I’ll do you in’ and ‘I’m gonna bounce all over your head; get your t*** out, show us your m****.'””

    You’ve got to wonder why he was allowed on in the first place:

    “Hazel Emmerson, prosecuting, said the yob was drunk on the busy 7am flight from Glasgow Airport on July 7 last year and eventually had to be restrained by an off-duty woman cop who was on the plane.

    McKeown was disruptive before the aircraft even took off 
and interfered with the safety 
demonstration

    I see he had to take a 4-day coach ride home as well.

    I think he got away lightly given the disruption he caused to all the other passengers as well.

  3. It was serious enough to divert the plane to Toulouse, thereby disrupting the entire day’s flying schedule and seriously pissing off over a thousand other passengers. Perhaps the on-board crew could be equipped with sedatives to better handle such behaviour. Didn’t the Soviets supposedly issue their spies with a drug which could sober them up in an instant?

  4. Mr. McKeown – drunk on the 7 am flight from Glasgow? Doesn’t surprise me. Last time I flew from Scotland at dawn the bars were crammed.
    Could be true elsewhere, but stereotypes exist for a reason. It was long ago noted that a drunk on the streets in England in daytime was usually a Scotsman. I met one once who was blearily telling everyone he wasn’t from this country, you know. That was before all-day opening hours, so maybe it’s different now.

  5. “I think he got away lightly given the disruption he caused to all the other passengers as well”: Glasgow must be becoming a bit mimsy nowadays. Time was when the other passengers would have dealt with him.

  6. I must admit to having had a couple of pints of Guinness at 7 in the morning at an airport before flying out on a holiday on a few occasions.

    I don’t normally drink Guinness (or anything else at 7 in the morning) but for some reason it feels right in an airport when you are off on holiday.

  7. Andrew, the idea of a drug that can sober you up in an instant intrigues me but I think it must be an urban myth. I have a limited understanding of how the body processes ethanol (plus later the other nasties) and from that I can’t see what a drug could do. But more importantly if there was a drug that could do that someone would have made an absolute fortune out of it.

  8. I’m with Andrew C – not normally a Guinness drinker, but drop me at Stansted at breakfast time and I’ll be straight on it.

  9. “Andrew M
    February 14, 2017 at 11:50 am

    It was serious enough to divert the plane . . .”

    Unfortunately, simply looking at someone cross-eyed is enough to get a plane diverted nowadays. So I’m more likely to be angry at the airline in such situations.

    The guy’s abusive – feed him a couple bottles of whisky (forcibly if necessary) and let him pass out in the lavatory. Quiet plane ride the rest of the way. And hey, if you get lucky he’ll choke on his own vomit.

  10. Agammamon,

    I find it hard to rationalise that. Why would an airline deliberately inconvenience not only the 200-odd passengers on that plane, but also the 1000+ passengers that the same plane is scheduled to carry for the rest across the rest of the day. There will also be overtime payments for pilots and cabin crew, and compensation payouts to affected passengers. In short it’s a huge expense for one unruly passenger.

    Are there better ways to deal with it? I don’t know. Lollipops are one option.

    Then again, I’ve never been on a particularly rowdy holiday flight. YouTube has some examples; and these are presumably the flights that didn’t get diverted. I can understand why cabin crew would be concerned.

  11. Because those costs are less than getting sued for not doing so ‘and something happens’.

    Plus – it may be less overseas – but over here flying is pretty much min-gestapoland. You so much as make a rude comment and they will turn that plane around and frog-march you off to jail.

  12. A couple of pints (at least) of plain is your only way to survive the experience of ‘processing’ at Satansted. And most other airports, these days.

    [I didn’t plan to change the name, but I rather like it that way.]

  13. Yeah, you forfeit your right to be an obnoxious cunt when you board the aircraft. Don’t like it? Don’t fly commercial.

  14. I object to the idea that because someone chooses to share their assets and experiences widely, they are obliged to do so to any drunken lout.

    No matter how low a lass may fall, I believe she has the right to refuse service for any reason at all. Being a drunken yob seems an excellent reason to me.

  15. Andrew, the idea of a drug that can sober you up in an instant intrigues me but I think it must be an urban myth.

    I am sceptical too, but I once accompanied a friend (in an ambulance through central London, great fun) to A&E on account that he was so drunk he could barely stand up. They wheeled him into a room in a wheelchair, barely conscious, and he walked out 45 minutes later with a mild headache and wondering where his wallet was (I had taken it for safekeeping, and expenses).

    They gave him something. I don’t think it was a miracle anti-pissed drug but it did have a startling effect.

  16. Unfortunately, simply looking at someone cross-eyed is enough to get a plane diverted nowadays.

    And with an RAF escort.

  17. “[…] the idea of a drug that can sober you up in an instant intrigues me but I think it must be an urban myth […] if there was a drug that could do that someone would have made an absolute fortune out of it.”

    It’s called cocaine. One of the main reasons why it’s so dangerous in combination with booze: it prevents the normal self-limiting factors of excess alcohol consumption from kicking in.

    My father pointed out to me the tendency of obnoxious winos in England to be Scottish. I remember one time we were at Salisbury Cathedral and spotted a derelict veering towards us. Dad said ten to one on he was a Jock. Lo and behold, the first words out of his mouth: “hey, Colonel*, gie us a quid frae a drink”.

    * when accosted by Caledonian piss artists, the resolutely Private soldier that was my father frequently seemed to attain a Colonelcy in their eyes.

Leave a Reply

Name and email are required. Your email address will not be published.