Oop North

This is not, however, a complete answer. We cannot leave the North of England with a 19th-century economy of whippet flanges and barm cake production purely because it’s more lucrative to upgrade southern commuter lines. And IPPR North are quite correct that at a more basic level, it is supply-side reform that we need.

73 comments on “Oop North

  1. Abolishing national pay scales… While I accept the distortion in local labour markets argument, there are problems in recruiting enough teachers and nurses to parts of the country. Scrapping national pay and increasing remuneration to address this shortage would only accentuate the distortion further?

  2. I appreciate the argument but suspect you still can’t attract sufficient numbers or quality to areas such as Grimsby or parts of Cornwall, for instance. And while they suffer from recruitment because it’s the last place you want to live, cities such as Aberdeen struggle because public sector pay isn’t high enough to compete with local industries.

  3. Good article. I’d like to see northern local authorities have the power to set their own minimum wage levels, opt out of the NPPF, and be able to locally licence premises for the purposes of consensual adults trading in vice.

  4. “Enterprise zones à la 80s Heseltine might be an idea, possibly.”

    If enterprise zones are a good idea why not make the whole country an enterprise zone rather than small areas which displaces activity rather than create an environment for new activity?

  5. The article starts off as if land value uplift is being taxed in London to pay for metropolitan infrastructure. It isn’t, though TW is a good proponent of the ideal of LVT, just too scared of losing journalism gigs to mention it very often. (It would also scare off his supporters who are nervous little souls but touchingly loyal in attacking Richard Murphy ,object of his irrational jealousy).
    The simple solution to problem is to levy LVT in the property- rich south and to spend it in the left- behind north.

  6. The message ‘pay our northern teachers, police and nurses less for our northern prosperity’ generates the unpleasant noise of grinding gears when it enters the brain.

    The noise subsides somewhat when its laid alongside the obvious to all twin points that; 1. Cost of living changes drastically region to region, and 2. Take home pay is not the same as standard of living pay. This means local businesses (aka employers and wealth generators) are stunted at birth. They are simply out competed by london weighted payscales which highly ironically their local business rates must contribute to.

    So do we know any special politician that will brave that initial noise, and make that argument? Or even braver bugger the argument and just do it. Abolish national public sector pay scales and wear a tin hat for a few years before they can show the results. I can’t think of one. Much easier to play pork barrel politics.

  7. I’d say that LVT would really help the north too. Rather than workers in Hull getting taxed the same for their work as people in Swindon, they’d pay far lower taxes.

  8. Aye, us folks from “Ooop north” do say it, even if we are just taking the piss.

    A big problem with fixing The North economically is the attitude: it’s still Labour heartland. I’m not sure infrastructure will sort that out.

    I come from somewhere that is one of the poorest bits of England (insomuch as any of England is truly poor). They’ve been voting Labour in every time since before I was born, somehow expecting the State to make their lives better.

    Einstein’s definition of madness and all that.

  9. Yes, they’ve rather doubled down on stupid politics in Scotland.

    One thing that bothers me is the claim that the SE, or at least London, sucks the life out of the rest of the economy.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9243256/London-sucks-the-life-out-of-Britain-Northern-MP-in-astonishing-rant-against-capital.html

    Never seems to occur to these folks that maybe they push the productive out.

    (on a tangent but worth adding, the Leavers I know up there are right-leaning and have made decent lives for themselves)

  10. > there are no projects adding sufficient value from the addition of a train set that we can capture it in such a fashion

    Perhaps not a train, but there are more than a few road projects which would pay for themselves. The good news is that the last government already twigged this, and upgrades are either underway or scheduled. Even the poor A303 to Devon will get a look in, eventually.

  11. Improving roads and railway services will certainly make it easier for Northeners to commute to London, where the jobs are.

  12. Is it not a self correcting issue over time?
    How long has the lure of London been sucking people in to work there?

  13. “I appreciate the argument but suspect you still can’t attract sufficient numbers or quality to areas such as Grimsby or parts of Cornwall, for instance. And while they suffer from recruitment because it’s the last place you want to live, cities such as Aberdeen struggle because public sector pay isn’t high enough to compete with local industries.”

    But this is the point of scrapping national pay scales and having local pay — you can pay what is needed to attract staff to a particular location. If Aberdeen needs to pay more it pays more. If somewhere else can pay less it pays less.

  14. “It’s a Southern affectation about the weird way that those from north of the Marylebone Road talk.”

    It’s an accurate representation of how people in the Midlands and the North talk. There are, of course, regional variations on how they say ‘oop’, but they rarely say ‘up’.

  15. I have to correct you there, Tel.

    In the Midlands it is pronounced “up”, “oop” is done as a piss-take.

    That said, at least in the East Midlands, the “u” in “up” is pronounced quite strongly, but not as an “oo”.

  16. But I have been caught referring “t’ t’ internet” before.

    (if you aren’t English, that means “to the internet” in East Midlander)

  17. “I’d like to see northern local authorities have the power … to locally licence premises for the purposes of consensual adults trading in vice.”

    They already do, as do all local authorities. If by “vice” you mean “activities intending to provide sexual stimulation”.

  18. Er… they do pronounce it ‘oop’, Cynic. I spend enough time in the East Midlands to know that very well. For example, in the video you have linked to, at about 48 seconds the speaker, who doesn’t have the strongest local accent, says ‘oonderstand’, rather than ‘understand’.

  19. That said, when it is meant to be an “oo”, that can be somewhat exaggerated, as in:

    “‘let’s ay a loook” (Let’s have a look)

    But “lucky git” would never be “loocky git”.

  20. And our take on “poof” is so much “puff” that I didn’t realise it was spelt with an “oo” until quite recently.

  21. Are you seriously telling me that you think that the pronunciation at the start of the word ‘understood’ at 0:48 in that video is the same as how Southerner’s pronounce it? It just isn’t. It’s not quite the same as how Northerners, or Brummies say it, but it is distinctly ‘oo’, as in ‘look’, rather than a hard ‘u’ as in ‘up’.

    And I’ve heard ‘Eye up my duck’ enough times to know that Nottingham people pronounce it ‘Eye oop my dook.’ (Even the ‘my’ has a regional accent, but that’s hard to get across with standard letters.)

    ‘Lucky git’ is most definitely ‘looky git’. Especially in the suburbs.

  22. No, I never said it is the same as Southerners say it. Straw man.

    No, we actually say “Ey up me duck”, or really ” mi’ ” rather than “me”. It’s not “my”. With that one, you’ve just proven you’ve been making things up to win a trivial argument on the internet.

  23. Back to economics for a second, what Tim says about public sector pay certainly rings true for out in the sticks. It does tend to be welfare or a job at the council for a lot of folks, and private sector employers seem to struggle to compete with either.

    I wonder if having more incentives for work-from-home might be a good way to get around this, rather than expecting employers to physically move up there.

    I can certainly see the appeal of living somewhere like Bolsover if I could telecommute to a London-based job most of the time, and they’d be able to drop the pay accordingly due to not having to pay the public transport costs (out of already-taxed income, too).

  24. Yes, they’ve rather doubled down on stupid politics in Scotland.

    Ah, yes, that fabled Tory austerity raping the life out of all those brave Caledonian entrepreneurs (the 55% employed in the state sector, at least.) The SNP have dumbed the curriculum down to generate more voting fodder (mind you, I still can’t reliably get English counties in the right order.

    Never covered in Geography up here) and are doubling up on that because they’ve caved to the teaching unions even more than down South, so even the ones who aren’t fuckwits come out of the drone-maker suspiciously ignorant.

    Still they should be able to list the signatories of the Declaration of Arbroath*.

    that the SE … sucks the life out of the rest of the economy.

    Nothing to do with me, mate. Puts hands in pockets and exits stage left, whistling tunelessly.

    * This was the one sent to Jacques Delors in April 1986, asking him to send his armies to protect the Scots from the depravations of the Evil Duchess of Thatcher.

  25. @jgh: Yes, premises for paid sex, cannabis consumption, cocaine, dance drugs, paid organ donation, the sort of thing the public regards as vice
    The northern LAs don’t have to allow it, they just have to be permitted to allow it

  26. Cynic,

    “One thing that bothers me is the claim that the SE, or at least London, sucks the life out of the rest of the economy.”

    In many ways, it does. A huge amount of the jobs in London are about the fact that the state puts things in London. Fund an opera house in London, and you’ve now created work for glaziers to manage the glass, bar staff to serve champagne, costume designers, apartments for sopranos.

    What’s the total number of jobs that depend on the BBC being in London? Not just employees, but nannies and cleaners of employees, cab drivers to drive people around, people to provide drinks for the green rooms, etc etc.

    I’ve yet to be approached about work by any entrepreneurs in London. Plenty of people at the end of a long chain from state funding, though. Software companies making websites for state-funded museums, software companies doing social services software, software companies doing things for the Olympics.

  27. Cynic, ‘Mi’ is close, yes. But why do you think I’m making things up? I spend a lot of time in the East Midlands. I’m just reporting how you all sound to outsiders. And how the guy on that video sounds. You don’t say ‘bus’, you say ‘boos’ (with the ‘oo’ as in ‘book’, not as in ‘poo’).

    It isn’t just that you sound different to Southerners, your accent clearly belong to the ‘oop North’ class of accent, even if your ‘oo’ is slightly different to others in that class. You can’t hear it because you’re from the area. It’s hard to distinguish one’s own accent (as I found years ago, until I gradually learned how to listen to it properly).

    I was recently reading about a guy who’s now a top QC, who came from the Midlands or the North, I forget where exactly, and at Uni he got his housemates to constantly correct him whenever he pronounced something with a Northern accent, in order that he could lose the accent. Because he just couldn’t hear it properly himself. Eventually it worked, but it took a lot of time.

    (The Amazon link you posted is simply a link to some book titles, which proves nothing about accents.)

  28. Given the troubles I’ve heard about from the Nottingham tram system, I’m also rather unconvinced when “more public transport” is touted as a solution.

    This is anecdotal, mind.

    They apparently ran the tram from the welfare zones to the centre, assuming all the freebie-golems would then jump at the chance of working for a living. As if.

    The bits on the outskirts where people actually bother to work, they still have to drive in. But then you get shite like the council taxing work parking (Workplace Parking Levy).

    Of course, the tram system runs along the (former) roads, so has buggered up the drive into work even further.

    To top it all off, the redeveloped train station no longer has the quick pickup/dropoff area, making intercity travel into Nottm less attractive.

  29. BTW these are not just my opinions, this is the opinion of everyone I talk to who is not from the area. It’s something every outsider talks about. I’m only going on about it because it’s something that crops up in my life so much.

    Someone recently told me the story of how she was at a school concert in Nottingham and the kids performed ‘Big Red Combine Harvester’, and all the non-locals were trying not to piss themselves laughing when the kids sang (with the ‘oo’ similar to the ‘oo’ in ‘book’, although it’s slightly different), ‘Choog, choog, choog, choog, chooging away’.

    I know this local guy, great guy, very bright and talented, sounds very educated, almost posh, at times, but it’s still hilarious when he says something like, ‘Don’t let’s make a foos about this’. Cracks everyone up.

  30. “They apparently ran the tram from the welfare zones to the centre, assuming all the freebie-golems would then jump at the chance of working for a living.”

    Not sure that’s true, but it would explain the line to Hucknall. The second stage was clearly designed (in part) to help Uni students get to Uni, and regular QMC patients get to the QMC hospital, because both those groups are strongly statist. There also seemed to be an intent to fit in with HS2, because the line to Chilwell is near the proposed Toton HS2 stop.

    “But then you get shite like the council taxing work parking (Workplace Parking Levy).
    Of course, the tram system runs along the (former) roads, so has buggered up the drive into work even further.
    To top it all off, the redeveloped train station no longer has the quick pickup/dropoff area, making intercity travel into Nottm less attractive.”

    I agree with you on all this.

  31. Move Parliament to the East Midlands, it’s on the M1, it has an airport with space for new runways and a train line.

    There is loads of currently cheap land that would increase in value.

    Sell the current Parliament building to a hotel chain/theme park.

    All the ministries and businesses will gravitate in that direction

  32. Move Parliament to the East Midlands, it’s on the M1, it has an airport with space for new runways and a train line.

    Milton Keynes would be lovely. There is some infrastructure already there, for which I’m sure our MPs and Lords would be very appreciative?

  33. BiW,

    they moved (forced) a chunk of the BBC to Manchester, that is why the only news you get is about Trump, they are starving Westminster of the oxygen of publicity as punishment.

  34. @Tel

    “I was recently reading about a guy who’s now a top QC, who came from the Midlands or the North, I forget where exactly, and at Uni he got his housemates to constantly correct him whenever he pronounced something with a Northern accent, in order that he could lose the accent. Because he just couldn’t hear it properly himself. Eventually it worked, but it took a lot of time.”

    Gary Bell QC I believe (I’ve just read his book ‘Animal QC’, ‘Animal’ having been his nickname during his days as a Forest hooligan. Very funny and interesting read, and he is also very sound politically.).

  35. BobRocket

    no point in moving to MK, it’s too close to London so none of the hangers on would follow.

    Ah, I can see your thinking. So maybe a little further afield.

    May I recommend Skegness? Or, if an international airport is important, then perhaps Grimsby (or even Hull)? It could give those communities on the east coast a real boost? And they would love that clean North Sea air in the mid winter.

  36. PF,

    Skeggy would be a hard sell even in a heatwave, I was thinking Donnington because it is just far enough, after 40 years when the new shiny £10bn Parliament building is falling down they could move to Warrington and start again.

  37. Move Parliament to the East Midlands … all the businesses will gravitate in that direction

    Yes, just as in the U.S. all the media and banks and corporate headquarters are in Washington D.C., having left New York shortly after 1790.

  38. @Tel

    You gave a very common phrase as evidence you know the area well, but got it wrong. You then casually dismissed inconvenient published works on the accent. That does give one reason to think the other person is just making things up for t’ internet debate, which is a common practice. Please don’t blame me for not believing you when you get “Ey up mi duck” wrong and double down on it.

    “choog” for “chug”? To me, what you are describing is a strong “u”, to differentiate from something leaning slightly toward “chag” from a Southerner.

    As an example, what I hear, very exaggerated, is:

    North: oop
    Middle: up
    South: ap

    We may have hit on something there. I would write it as “oop” coming from a broad Northerner specifically to differentiate from “up” as a Midlander. You appear to have something like “oop”, “oop” and “up” to my “oop”, “up” and “ap”.

  39. “ap” is estuary or cockney; nobody west of Edgware Road speaks like that. In posh areas, some older people still say “ep north” (imagine a Pathé News reader’s voice).

  40. I’d really not recommend moving more government to the Midlands. The government and the Midlands are lefty enough as it is, never mind combining the two!

    OTOH, the point has been made before (by Timmy?) that a lot of companies have offices around London because that’s where the government is, for meetings and lobbying and whatnot. That’s a separate point to what BiND has said about a lot of the work being part of a chain back to the State.

    In my own case, there’s also a bit of inertia. When you are just starting out, you take a job anywhere. At the time I was doing so, most of the entry-level grad jobs were in the SE and particularly within the M25. So you move down, make friends, maybe get a wife/girlfriend. Before you know it, your life is anchored to the SE. You move down when you aren’t experienced and have little choice; then when you are and could move away, you don’t because your life is there.

    But we shouldn’t overlook the “push” that comes from the places that lose talent, as those areas do need to take some/most responsibility for the brain drain rather than just blaming London.

    (Take Iran as an extreme example. It turns out some really educated people. But the folks in charge and their supporters are utter twats. So many of those educated young people leave for Europe and N America.)

  41. BobRocket

    I know – just wishful thinking..:)

    And I liked the geographical symmetry of the 4 parliaments – Stormont, Edinburgh, Cardiff… and Skeggy. Lincolnshire being a solid option for “England”.

  42. @Andrew M

    “ap” is estuary or cockney; nobody west of Edgware Road speaks like that. In posh areas, some older people still say “ep north” (imagine a Pathé News reader’s voice).

    Agreed. To be clear, that’s why I said “very exaggerated”.

    To me everyone says “up”, it’s just whether it leans away from the EMid “up” toward “ap” or “ep” or “oop”.

  43. “what Tim says about public sector pay certainly rings true for out in the sticks. It does tend to be welfare or a job at the council for a lot of folks, and private sector employers seem to struggle to compete with either.”

    Easy: treat “welfare” in the same way as public sector pay i.e. no national scales.

  44. Yep, given we should be measuring from the point of consumption rather than income, it would make a lot of sense to apply PPP to benefits and PS pay across the country.

    Something that nags away in my head is that welfare is a good way of keeping the recipients in their little enclaves. You know, that it’s worth paying the extra tax to keep my strange-looking ex-compatriots in their northern Labour strongholds and away from the rest of you.

    I don’t think I’ve ever encountered any real regional snobbery from southerners, it’s only ever been on the grounds of class (the usual middle-class failing lefties getting the ‘ump). But I’m not sure they really want loads of people from Bolsover and Merseyside turning up because the benefits are higher in the SE.

  45. Cynic,

    It’s tricky to apply PPP to benefits. Most of the basic goods we buy have similar prices nationally. An £8 t-shirt from Primark costs £5 everywhere, as far as I’m aware. Water/gas/electric bills aren’t noticeably higher in the southeast. Supermarkets vary their prices a little bit according to how much their local customers can afford to spend, but not by much. Outside of zone 1, the only big difference in prices between London and the rest of the country is property. Housing benefit claimants already get a location adjustment (since around 2008).

    The thing is, most of our benefits bill actually goes on (a) pensions, (b) disability benefits, (c) in-work benefits. Very little goes on simple job seekers’ allowance.

  46. The Nottm trams pass through the town centre, which is often full of folks that are wellied. A poly and and a uni being nearby, for a start. The trams are pretty quiet… I think they’ve been lucky so far.

    Regardless of that, it’s got a strong whiff of boondoggle about it.

    Especially as they are talking of linking it to HS2, The Great British Boondoggle, which is creeping closer and closer to squashing the former mining village I grew up in. It’s a good job the government’s paid off all its debts and has spare money left over each year, isn’t it?

  47. @AndrewM

    Good point. Housing’s probably the easiest one, so it makes sense they’ve already gone for that.

    I tend to separate out welfare and state pensions, probably wrongly.

    There is an argument I’ve heard, I can’t remember from whom it was though, which I have some sympathy with. It’s that we shouldn’t pay more welfare to live in London or the SE, because if you can’t afford to live there, live somewhere else (e.g. Bolsover or Merseyside). So set the level of welfare at one that would buy a basic standard of living somewhere hospitable in the UK. but don’t let the freebie-grabbers be choosy.

    The risk, I think, is that you’d end up with ghettos from which it would be difficult to escape. The jobless would head north, the productive would flee south, and you’d end up with two totally different countries. And the odd bright spark that would emerge in the north might never have the opportunity to get out. It’s an extreme scenario, though.

    But it does bug me a bit seeing no-efforters lounge around in commuter towns and the like.

    I once worked for a company in central London, prime location. Across the street, they built flats. A portion of the flats were then given to welfare johnnies. So folks like me, renting a room or living in a pokey flat a train journey away, got to look out of the window at lazy sods living in prime location comfort at our expense, watching Trisha all day, right under our taxed noses.

  48. I think I’ve just argued in favour of a Universal Ciizens’ Income, local market salary rates and no minimum wage.

  49. “Something that nags away in my head is that welfare is a good way of keeping the recipients in their little enclaves”

    As is council housing. You can’t leave to take up that job offer 100 miles away because you’d lose the flat/house and would be at the bottom of the list in the next town. Also, if they left the bubble they might get funny ideas about tax, working for a living etc.

    Nail that voting fodder down nice and tight.

  50. How tight do you have to nail them? In Stoke, Labour are fielding a candidate who hates Corbyn, old-fashioned socialism, Brexiteers, Stoke, women on TV and yet he will win because Ukip are a shambles rather than an organisation. If there is no sentient anti-Labour organisation north of Watford Gap, Labour will win with the proverbial pig on a stick every time

  51. Yep, it does seem a little like all you have to do is give them the Labour-voting habit and they’ll stick.

    My childhood home of Bolsover on Wikipedia:

    “The MP for the constituency is the Labour Party’s Dennis Skinner, a former miner who has represented the seat since 1970.”

    “In an interview in late November, director Kenneth Glenaan and Robert Carlyle both agreed that Bolsover was the perfect setting for the film as it ‘has been left in the past’. It also said that going from Matlock to Bolsover is like going to a different country and claimed the Castle Estate is ‘the land time forgot’.[10]”

    Not just the same party, but the same MP since 1970.

    Yet it comes in around the 10th percentile for shitness:

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2012/mar/06/poverty-england-experian-rankings

    You’d think folks’d start to wonder if maybe they were approaching things the wrong way. Maybe a little less faith in big government?

    But as Rob points out, there’s not much incentive to do anything about it unless you’ve got an unusual amount of drive. Get a council house, get some welfare, sit on your ass watching Sky till you die.

    Not sure how you’re supposed to create an economic powerhouse out of that.

  52. And Stoke from Wikipedia:

    The city is covered by three House of Commons constituencies: Stoke-on-Trent North, Stoke-on-Trent Central and Stoke-on-Trent South.[58] All three have returned Labour MPs without interruption since their creation in 1950. The city is within the West Midlands European Parliament constituency.

    Free from right-wing tyranny, the joys of uninterrupted socialism have brought them to:

    http://www.stokesentinel.co.uk/stoke-trent-eighth-poorest-area-country/story-15421602-detail/story.html

    D’oh.

  53. I’m told people vote Labour because they are poor.

    My hypothesis is that being poor and voting Labour are just symptoms.

  54. Cynic,


    I once worked for a company in central London, prime location. Across the street, they built flats. A portion of the flats were then given to welfare johnnies. So folks like me, renting a room or living in a pokey flat a train journey away, got to look out of the window at lazy sods living in prime location comfort at our expense, watching Trisha all day, right under our taxed noses.”

    And that’s why it’s wrong at the moment. Why should an unemployment person get to live in London and a working bloke who is working there doesn’t?

    It also creates bad disincentives. If a cleaner can get a flat on the cheap, a business gets a cheap cleaner. When really, the business should have to pay what a cleaner costs. Because then, the business might decide that it makes more sense to move out of London and move to somewhere cheaper.

    £10bn is spent on housing benefit for London. All that ends up as is a subsidy to landlords.

  55. It also leads to wasted money on providing public transport, which doesn’t really look being very profitable when you take the infra costs into account as well as running the rolling stock

    (the TOCs and ROSCOs might turn a profit, but I’m not sure the industry does when you include track and things like Thameslink 2000 and HS2)

    Even back when I was a student in Nottm, it struck me as nuts that the welfare gang there got to live within walking distance of work they had no interest in doing, while many folks with jobs couldn’t afford to live any closer than the suburbs.

  56. Going back to Tim’s article, one thing I really struggle with when presented economic ideas from the government (in particular) and their hangers-on (like these “policy institute” outfits) is a lack of credibility.

    The government hasn’t balanced its books since I don’t know when. It borrows to cover running costs and debt interest. I mean, it’s one thing to borrow money for an actual investment, something with a return. But just to cover day-to-day expenditure? Get real. I might as well get financial advice from a drunk guy smelling of piss outside a Ladbrokes.

    Whether it’s MMGW, WMDs, “no return to boom and bust”, flogging gold or Brexit, the predictions are bollocks.

    So yeah, when the public sector or their entourage start telling me that “more money will fix this”, I’m inclined to think the opposite.

  57. “The government hasn’t balanced its books since I don’t know when. It borrows to cover running costs and debt interest. I mean, it’s one thing to borrow money for an actual investment, something with a return. But just to cover day-to-day expenditure?”

    New Labour, especially Brown, got round that by designating just about everything they spent as “investment”. Investing in education, the NHS, training for NEETs, you name it it was an “investment” but not once did they talk about rates of return or point to any specific benefit some years later.

  58. “You gave a very common phrase as evidence you know the area well, but got it wrong. You then casually dismissed inconvenient published works on the accent. That does give one reason to think the other person is just making things up for t’ internet debate, which is a common practice. Please don’t blame me for not believing you when you get “Ey up mi duck” wrong and double down on it.”

    ??? I’m telling you the accent I hear all the time around Nottingham. If you can’t hear it like outsiders do *it’s because you’re a local*. It’s not a difficult concept.

    As it happens, I just spent half an hour late this afternoon in a room with a man from Nottingham marvelling at the auditory hallucination I was having. Although it sounded to me like he was speaking in a strong ‘oop North’ accent, so much so that I was having trouble understanding him, I know from being instructed by an angry man on the internet who’s from Nottingham that I was imagining it all. Or perhaps I’m just making it all oop. So this angry man tells me.

    And that’s not to mention the auditory hallucination I have every time I listen to the video you linked to.

    As for your ‘published works’, as I said you simply posted a link to a page of Amazon book titles, most of them the same book, which does absolutely nothing to prove anything about the way the word ‘duck is pronounced locally. (Aso, those books seem to be concerned with regional words rather than accents.)

    And your Wikipedia page is mainly concerned with local words, it says very little about accents.

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