Doesn’t sound quite right, does it?

The Met Office is warning of significant disruption from gale-force winds and heavy rain in much of Britain as the balmy start to the week is due to be blown away by Storm Doris.

Doris? A storm called Doris?

Names are very strongly associated with fashion and thus the age and class of the person with that name. Commonly, a name will start out as a Royal one – or more recently very well known in some other manner – and then move down the classes over the years.

Yes, OK, Doris Day, Doris Lessing, but the current position of the name in the British iconography is about right for a great grandmother of no great status or position in life (other, of course, then being the matriarch). It’s just difficult to think of a Storm Doris, what, a storm of teacosies and chilblain plasters?

21 comments on “Doesn’t sound quite right, does it?

  1. The list of names is drawn up by the UK and Irish Met Offices so maybe Doris is big in Ireland.

    The other reason could be they can’t think of many Anglo-Irish girls names that begin with D.

  2. You have to query why on earth would the Met Office want to name storms in the first place, do they feel left out of the loop, not edgy enough, because they name hurricanes in the states.

    As there are few hurricanes relative to storms it makes some sense but storms, who is going next year to relate to a storm one of dozens by saying, “do you remember Tristram in 09” don’t think so.

  3. Chinese teachers take an “English” name to make things easier for the round eyes. We have a Chinese teacher Doris.

    Also soldier boys call girls Doris the same way Aussies say Sheila.

  4. Was discussing this yesterday – how many we know/knew. A Doris in my form at school: very much the contemporary It Girl (Cathy McGowan wannabe, often seen on the back of a Lambretta). Two others in subsequent years, albeit of similar vintage. The style reappears from time to time but the name appears to have fallen from fashion.

  5. The Met Office have only recently started naming storms, in line with their view that they’re all caused by globule warming. We’ve always had storms and we’ll always have storms because Britain lies at that latitude where cold polar air and warm maritime tropical air meet. Being at the end of a continent and also at the edge of an ocean merely compounds the issue. A storm, according to the Beaufort scale is any wind above 55mph, and you know what, it’s not exactly unusual in winter. Who knew?

  6. I once knew a complete airhead of a girl; a full-on touchy-feely hippy, away with the fairies with only a tenuous grip on reality. She was also a rather large girl – we called her “Planet Doris.”

    In other news, my old martial arts teacher used to tell a story about a Chinese student who pestered and pestered him for advice about a suitable English name that she could use. In the end he advised “Urethra”.

  7. Doris was the name of King Herrods wife I think. The one who killed all first born boys. Wonder if there is anything in that.

  8. It’s just difficult to think of a Storm Doris, what, a storm of teacosies and chilblain plasters?

    Perhaps it’s to do with the large amount of wind that is predicted.

  9. It’s the “how do you feel about….?” generation.

    Science, technology, actualite can’t simply exist. There has to be some human emotion.

  10. On the old Motley Fool financial forums “Doris” was yer elderly investor who wanted income at lowish risk from her share portfolio, and didn’t want to trade much.

  11. “The Met Office is warning of Stiff Breeze Agatha which has the potential to wrap washing round the clothes line. Heavy Shower Gertrude may cause some largish puddles in the district so motorists are warned to be careful not to splash any little old ladies on the pavement.”

    “The huge rise in extreme weather is blamed on people trying to keep warm and driving their kids to school. A spokesman from the Met Office said: “There has been a massive increase in the number of named storms since we started calling any little bit of weather after your great aunt. Anyone who doesn’t agree with me is a denying denier who denies science.””

  12. @rapscallion, February 22, 2017 at 10:05 am

    The Met Office have only recently started naming storms, in line with their view that they’re all caused by globule warming. We’ve always had storms and we’ll always have storms because Britain lies at that latitude where cold polar air and warm maritime tropical air meet. Being at the end of a continent and also at the edge of an ocean merely compounds the issue. A storm, according to the Beaufort scale is any wind above 55mph, and you know what, it’s not exactly unusual in winter.

    +1

    And in summer too

    Back to names:

    Storm Dorothy – :wink

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