Ummm

A senior NHS boss has been forced out of his job after exposing a hospital sex ring where senior consultants used code words to arrange sex with colleagues, it is alleged.
The health workers exchanged hundreds of emails in which they used code words such as ‘Marmite’ and ‘cappuccino’ to arrange sexual liaisons at one of the country’s top hospitals, it was revealed last month.
The discovery of the sordid activity – which often took place yards from patients – has led to claims of a cover-up after the hospital refused to sack the two highly-paid consultants after a disciplinary hearing lasting just 20 minutes.

Consenting adults have sex with people they are not married to.

And?

23 comments on “Ummm

  1. Don’t care about their sex antics but if they are doing it on the taxpayer’s bought and paid for time–ie charging us a high rate for their pleasure then it should certainly be stopped.

  2. Surely such activities would infringe the code of conduct of any large organisation. I am aware of people being dismissed for having sex in a computer room… They forgot about the cctv.

  3. What Ecksy said.

    Only 48 hours to save the NHS from Them Evil Tories, but plenty of time to fuck in the laundry room while some poor sod waits for her pain meds.

  4. If they had code words to arrange meetings to discuss train spotting or to play monopoly, I think we can be sure they would not have been fired.

    This is the unfortunate British prudery raising its head – and searching for an excuse to fire them. I commend the hospital for refusing to do so. A reprimand at best.

    Who is harmed if the doctors are banging some nurses?

  5. What Mr Ecks said.

    They are paid – by us – to take out tonsils, not play hide the salami with the radiographer from B Ward.

    If they are getting it on outside work hours, fine.

  6. JuliaM – “They are paid – by us – to take out tonsils, not play hide the salami with the radiographer from B Ward.”

    Consultants. What are they supposed to do between consults? They are not junior doctors. Their main job is supervising all the junior staff. Not tonsils.

    If doctors are between patients, they might watch TV. Read a book. Chat. Have a cup of tea.

    Which of these precisely is unacceptable in the NHS?

  7. I appreciate that Smfs is trying to act as devil’s advocate but it does seem to be a fact that there are lengthy queues of patients waiting for attention in every NHS facility. Perhaps consultants should be doing something more useful in the world of smfs than watching TV or bonking

  8. The key to this story is the yards from patients phrase. I work in the NHS and people here were caught shagging onsite. Nothing happened because they weren’t in a clinical area. If they had been, they’d have got their jotters.

  9. My neighbour went in for a knee replacement last Wednesday. All prepped, surgeon, anaesthetist and rest of team standing by when he was informed there was no knee available, not even in the private hospital across town. Plenty of time for shagging there.

  10. Diogenes – “Perhaps consultants should be doing something more useful in the world of smfs than watching TV or bonking”

    Doctors have working lives a lot like soldiers. Work arrives in bursts when everyone is really busy. But they are short bursts. Then there are long hours with nothing much to do. The delays in the NHS are due to many things and doctors are just one of them – all the doctors may be ready but there may be no operating rooms, or the nurses may be strike or whatever.

    I don’t know the specifics of this. It is possible that there were people dying in Emergency because the doctors were knocking uglies, but I doubt it. The dead people would have been named and counted if any. There may be delays due to doctors doing other things. In the end the problems with the NHS are due to poor management, imo.

    What this sounds like is bitterness driven by the fact that most of us don’t get to bang Filipina nurses at work. BiS excepted perhaps. Yes, they should not be doing it. But let’s keep some sense of perspective.

  11. @Hugh

    I get that the patients bit is an aggravating factor, but i don’t get why sex at work is OK?

    I’ve worked in places where two staff having it off was an issue- it was a distraction for all and sundry. Partly because of the gossip, partly because much of the relationship was conducted on work time. It wasn’t one of those ‘you’d never know they were a couple’ instances, it was a continuing drama played out in front of us all.

    There was no banging in the supply closet, but it was still a drain on the place- if they had been shagging on site during working hours, they would have been sacked.

    Why is this OK at a hospital?

  12. Surely such activities would infringe the code of conduct of any large organisation.

    Yeah. You don’t mind the graduates hooking up or the occasional senior hires, but having your staff shagging each other en masse is bound to impact on the business, even if we pretend there are no senior-junior relationship issues.

    I might be a prude here, but I’m not convinced I could work effectively among a bunch of women I’ve shagged recently, and have been knowingly passed around my male colleagues.

  13. Presumably if it was gays, they’d get a free pass?

    SMFS,

    > Doctors have working lives a lot like soldiers. Work arrives in bursts when everyone is really busy. But they are short bursts. Then there are long hours with nothing much to do.

    In the emergency room, no doubt; but for routine operations? If so, that’s shockingly poor resource planning.

  14. There seems to be a divergence of views here.

    Maybe the midle course would be to permit acts of congress in NHS facilities provided that they take place on a trolley in a corridor which would allow the ‘health professionals’ better to understand the ‘patient experience’.

  15. In my experience only 20% of the criticism is about professional conduct and tax payer funded time reasons.

    The other 80% is about the fact that other people are having great sex that does not include the complainer, who is typically going through a sexual drought.

  16. “code words such as ‘Marmite’ and ‘cappuccino’” but not ‘pizza’ thank goodness.

  17. SMFS

    .Their main job is supervising all the junior staff. Not tonsils.

    Seems like it was the nurses’ tonsils that were being tickled. Ahem!

    I’ll get my coat.

  18. In my experience only 20% of the criticism is about professional conduct and tax payer funded time reasons.

    I am more than happy for public servants at all levels to lead lives of fulfilling sexual excess that make my plain vanilla love life look like something Mary Whitehouse would pity.

    But I don’t want them doing it on my dime, while at the same time moaning that their lives are intolerable because Austerity. I’m sure in our ‘failing NHS’ there is plenty that needs doing.

    I feel exactly the same about them playing Monopoly.

  19. Salamander, perhaps you could say more about your experiences. Have you worked in a large number of organisations where sex in office hours was rampant?

    And as for smfs’s point about workloads, consultants spend their time running clinics, teaching, performing or supervising pre – booked operations such as hip replacements, fitting pacemakers etc, writing proposals for research grants, attending committee meetings, conducting research, keeping up-to-date etc. They do not often get called in for emergencies. Senior managers in any other large organisation would get sacked for this sort of conduct. As well as the computer room escapade I referred to earlier, I can think of 2 very senior execs who got sacked for sexual shenanigans that risked bringing the company into disrepute. I suppose the holy NHS is above such morality

  20. @Diogenes

    A couple of places where some people were sneaking away to a convenient cupboard or server room.

    And the most vocal criticism where the near retirement age ladies whose husbands were obsessed with fishing and golf and the born again Christians going through their third divorce.

  21. Doctors have working lives a lot like soldiers. Work arrives in bursts when everyone is really busy. But they are short bursts. Then there are long hours with nothing much to do.

    Completely wrong.

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