I’m sorry but I really do not believe these people

Smith said: “Teenagers and young girls are being forced to wrap or stuff toilet paper down their knickers, to prevent them from bleeding all over themselves while at schools. The cost of sanitary products are just too much for some girls and their families, and it’s leading to missing school and it’s putting their health at risk.”

“It’s absolutely despicable in the 21st century that girls are being forced to comprise their education simply because an absolute necessity is unavailable and not affordable.”

I am absolutely certain that there are parts of the world where £1 or £2 a month is a large amount, one that might well be spent elsewhere.

I do not believe this of modern Britain. Sorry, I simply do not.

20 comments on “I’m sorry but I really do not believe these people

  1. Graun’s subbing still as awful as ever: part of that article deals with the taboos around the parts of geometry that deal with lengths and volumes.

  2. Yes very doubtful logic.

    Menstruation is a box in a survey of school non showers up. X people tick it. Some of those people are low income. Therefore giving free tampons will mean x people will turn up to school in the future.

  3. So there are probably two real problems.

    Some ladies have significant problems around their periods. To the extent that they aren’t able to work effectively, drive safely etc. This is probably a smaller number than claim it (see “Man Flu”.) But girls will still be adjusting (and possibly aren’t allowed the magic meds that some of my university friends took.)

    Some girls will find it all very embarrassing (as is much of puberty) and it is yet another weight on the wrong side of the teenager “don’t want to go in to school” balance. But then, so would be visiting the school nurse for your grat issue of tampons / towels, I suspect.

    So the actual effect of the Guardian solution on the real (rather than the Guardian) problem is likely to be minimal.

  4. I do wonder if the Guardian has been trolled.

    Hayley Smith is Stans’s
    right-on hippy daughter in American Dad!, and this is the sort of nonsense she’d come out with.

    The charity being called “Flow Aid” and the slogan “Girls Have Periods. Get over it” sounds exactly like one of her campaigns.

    If it’s not trolling, it’s so sublimely good that it should be.

  5. UK smartphone penetration amongst working age population is 91%.
    A nation that furnishes its people with iPhones aint a poor one.

  6. Women have been using pads since –civilisation probably.

    If they can’t afford disposables–which is highly unlikely–then old-fashioned cloth pads which can be washed and re-used.

    Do these girls have mothers? The weekly wash should surely tell them what is going on–even if they are too dumb to realise that they daughters puberty is at hand. Is it beyond the wit of these women to contrive a washable cloth pad? Or buy one if they are still being made in a disposable age. Or do girls these days all have mothers who don’t give a shit?

  7. Yes, rags is the traditional method.
    Can someone too poor to afford a pound find a rag? Yes. Can they find multiple rags? Yes.
    Can they wash them? Yes.
    Problem solved.

    Oh wait you mean the issue wasn’t actually that issue at all?

  8. I have sympathy with a kid unprepared who stupidly spent her money on chewing gum, thinking that she still had a day’s grace, because kids are stupid and inexperienced, One or two experiences ought to make her learn a lesson. Her mother ought to have learnt the lesson a generation before.

  9. Now that we’ve established how cheap sanitary production is, why shouldn’t schools provide it free for any girl who needs it?

  10. Cheap is not free. You want to help with a non-problem Pro-go down to the school gate and offer the girls money to help with their sanitary arrangements. .

    No….perhaps not such a good idea.

    Nothing to stop you setting up your own charity tho’.

  11. “Now that we’ve established how cheap sanitary production is, why shouldn’t schools provide it free for any girl who needs it?”

    Socks and underwear are cheap too. As are crisps, pencils, iTunes downloads, mobile phones and chewing gum. Do we supply all of these to teenagers as well?

    This idea that ‘teenagers’ can’t afford sanitary towels is a nonsense. Teenagers don’t have money, or incomes. They have parents who either have income from employment and/or are provided with money by the State (if they are poor) out of which they are meant to provide for their children. If the parents of said children are wasting their incomes on beer, fags and Sky TV then take up the lack of sanitary towels with the parents, they are the ones responsible for the problem. Not the rest of us taxpayers who have already done more than our bit via the tax and welfare system.

  12. Jim is correct. Western Civilization is a moneyed economy. The notion that they “can’t afford” doesn’t wash, as, if true, they would starve to death. EVERYTHING takes money. No one has no money.

    Deciding to give away ‘critical’ items results in more and more things being declared critical.

    ‘ “Teenagers and young girls are being forced to wrap or stuff toilet paper down their knickers’

    Forced?

    ‘The charity, which provides products to women in Kenya, agreed to do the same for local girls.’

    No problem. As long as government stays out of it.

  13. “Cheap is not free”, agreed. Say 20,000 girls affected, £15 a year each, £300k. divided among 30 million income tax payers that’s a penny a year each.

    “If the parents of said children are wasting their incomes … they are the ones responsible for the problem”, agreed. And not their daughters.

  14. ““Cheap is not free”, agreed. Say 20,000 girls affected, £15 a year each, £300k. divided among 30 million income tax payers that’s a penny a year each.”

    And the same can be said for everything else. Perhaps schools should feed children for free too, morning noon and night. Pay for their shoes, clothes, provide showers and personal hygiene products, cut their hair too perhaps. All of which might cost pence per taxpayer as well. Where does it end? Do the parents still get the child support and child tax credit payments as well?

    Tell you what, spend what you like, just take the money off child welfare payments. If its not being spent by the parents on the kids, then take it off the parents and spend it direct. Knock yourselves out. Just don’t ask me for another penny, I pay enough already.

  15. If parents are spending their money on themselves rather than their children then give the child allowance to the child and they can spend it on themselves.

  16. Re: Jim “…Pay for their shoes, clothes, provide showers and personal hygiene products, cut their hair too perhaps…”

    Don’t forget about the refugee/immigrant ‘boys,’ in addition to the above, they will also need free shavers.

  17. Gamecock,

    “No problem. As long as government stays out of it.”

    The whole point of this situation in Leeds is precisely that.

    There isn’t actually a problem in Leeds or anywhere else with girls being unable to afford tampons. It’s just about the industrialisation of charity, Third Sector cunts trying to create a living. These people are some of the most dishonest folks around. The private sector wouldn’t get away with the sort of lies that charities put in their adverts.

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